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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | January 19, 2003
It's been suggested that the best film scores are the ones you hardly notice, those so perfectly in pitch with what's on screen that the effect is almost subliminal, serving the films without ever calling attention to themselves. But that's an oversimplification at best, at worst a cop-out that tries to establish the ordinary as the gold standard. For while it's true that many a perfectly serviceable film score goes largely unnoticed, the best take their movies and their audiences to new heights, underscoring -- but never overemphasizing, and certainly not obfuscating -- the emotion of the film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
An extra spark in the playing at the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's first program of the 2014-2015 subscription series a week ago made me think this would turn out to be an exceptional season. Something about the second program this weekend made me even more convinced. I know you are tired of hearing me say this, but I just want to make sure it's sinking in - the BSO is operating at a technical peak these days and demonstrating a tighter rapport than ever with music director Marin Alsop.
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NEWS
By Jon Pareles and Jon Pareles,New York Times News Service | February 4, 2007
ROME -- For many filmmakers through the years, a certain kind of pilgrimage to Rome leads to the opulent parlor of the composer Ennio Morricone. It's the place where he has discussed grand concepts and crucial details, and often unveiled new themes on the piano, for the distinctive film scores he has written over the past four decades, from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly to The Mission. There are more than 400 of them, though he hasn't kept count. Yesterday, Morricone, 78, was to make his long-overdue American concert debut with 200 musicians and singers at Radio City Music Hall in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
HBO's Liberace film "Behind the Candelabra" was the highest rated premiere of a movie in the last nine years on the premium cable channel. And that's covering some very impressive ground, like "Game Change" and "You Don't Know Jack," to name a couple of made-for-TV movies on HBO in recent years. The first showing of the film at 9 p.m. Sunday drew 2.4 million viewers, according to Deadline. The last time any film did better was in May of 2004, when "Something the Lord Made," which was filmed in Baltimore, premiered to 2.6 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | January 19, 2003
In the beginning, there was film. And sound. The two have been inseparable for roughly a century. But wait -- the first movies were silent, and "talkies" only arrived in the late 1920s, so what's this about a century of sound and film? It's simple. "Silent films were never silent," says composer and conductor John Williams, whose memorable film scores have earned him five Oscars. "There was always music to go with them." Once sound-on-film became possible, the marriage of the visual and aural arts blossomed even more, producing an extraordinary musical legacy.
NEWS
February 5, 2011
Sunday, Feb. 6 Recital Saxophonist David Rybczynski and pianist William Scanian Murphy perform the works of Maurice Ravel, Vittorio Monti, Eugene Bozza and others at 4 p.m. in Monteabaro Recital Hall at Howard Community College, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway. Tickets are $15, $10 for seniors, $5 for HCC faculty, students and staff. Information: 443-518-1000. Art exhibit The paintings of Marc Boone and Michael Sastre will be on display through March 13 in the Rouse Co. Foundation Gallery at Howard Community College, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
An extra spark in the playing at the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's first program of the 2014-2015 subscription series a week ago made me think this would turn out to be an exceptional season. Something about the second program this weekend made me even more convinced. I know you are tired of hearing me say this, but I just want to make sure it's sinking in - the BSO is operating at a technical peak these days and demonstrating a tighter rapport than ever with music director Marin Alsop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC | August 29, 1999
STOCKBRIDGE, Mass. -- You could say that John Williams is as big as Beethoven. Even if you're a highbrow who confuses the 67-year-old American film composer with the classical guitarist of the same name, it's a cinch that the composer's music is as familiar as the first movements of the "Moonlight" Sonata or the Fifth Symphony. He's the guy responsible for the menacing da-DUM, da-DUM bass ostinato that automatically rings in your head every time you think about sharks ("Jaws")
FEATURES
November 10, 2005
Tonight at 7:30, the Maryland Film Festival offers a rare movie going experience at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St. San Francisco's Beth Custer Ensemble performs its new score for My Grandmother, a rarely seen, an archic 65-minute Russian movie that makes fun of the Soviet bureaucracy. Tickets are $8 to $10. Call the Maryland Film Festival office at 410-752-8083 for more details.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
HBO's Liberace film "Behind the Candelabra" was the highest rated premiere of a movie in the last nine years on the premium cable channel. And that's covering some very impressive ground, like "Game Change" and "You Don't Know Jack," to name a couple of made-for-TV movies on HBO in recent years. The first showing of the film at 9 p.m. Sunday drew 2.4 million viewers, according to Deadline. The last time any film did better was in May of 2004, when "Something the Lord Made," which was filmed in Baltimore, premiered to 2.6 million.
NEWS
February 5, 2011
Sunday, Feb. 6 Recital Saxophonist David Rybczynski and pianist William Scanian Murphy perform the works of Maurice Ravel, Vittorio Monti, Eugene Bozza and others at 4 p.m. in Monteabaro Recital Hall at Howard Community College, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway. Tickets are $15, $10 for seniors, $5 for HCC faculty, students and staff. Information: 443-518-1000. Art exhibit The paintings of Marc Boone and Michael Sastre will be on display through March 13 in the Rouse Co. Foundation Gallery at Howard Community College, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Whether you're coming to "Metropolis" fresh or for the third or fourth time, seeing the "complete" 147-minute version of Fritz Lang's 1927 silent masterpiece is like watching a fever dream reach delirious perfection. This glorious dystopia gains in both logic and gusto. Building on the 2001 124-minute restoration, it fills out Lang's vision of a futuristic city as a glittering, buzzing organism that thrusts high up into the atmosphere and digs way down into the earth. Now you can really connect to the romantic fervor behind the cool genius of Joh Fredersen, the architect of Metropolis — and the animus that simmers, then explodes between him and his mad-magician inventor, Rotwang.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | January 25, 2008
There's embarrassment and shame in this admission, but you need to know: We forgot about Woody Sauldsberry. He was the NBA's Rookie of the Year in 1958, just the second black man to win the award. He played for four NBA teams and later the Harlem Globetrotters. Retirement wasn't always easy. Diabetes claimed one of his legs and had its sights set on the other. When Sauldsberry died last year in Baltimore, there was no obituary in the next day's newspaper and no old highlights aired on that night's SportsCenter.
NEWS
By Jon Pareles and Jon Pareles,New York Times News Service | February 4, 2007
ROME -- For many filmmakers through the years, a certain kind of pilgrimage to Rome leads to the opulent parlor of the composer Ennio Morricone. It's the place where he has discussed grand concepts and crucial details, and often unveiled new themes on the piano, for the distinctive film scores he has written over the past four decades, from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly to The Mission. There are more than 400 of them, though he hasn't kept count. Yesterday, Morricone, 78, was to make his long-overdue American concert debut with 200 musicians and singers at Radio City Music Hall in New York.
FEATURES
November 10, 2005
Tonight at 7:30, the Maryland Film Festival offers a rare movie going experience at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St. San Francisco's Beth Custer Ensemble performs its new score for My Grandmother, a rarely seen, an archic 65-minute Russian movie that makes fun of the Soviet bureaucracy. Tickets are $8 to $10. Call the Maryland Film Festival office at 410-752-8083 for more details.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | September 14, 2003
My shoulder hurts, my back hurts, the whole right side of me hurts -- just from sitting and writing millions of notes," composer John Corigliano says early one morning from a Beverly Hills hotel. "This has been the year of writing billion-note orchestral pieces." One of those big pieces is the Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, subtitled The Red Violin, after the Francois Girard film of that name, which owed much of its artistic richness to Corigliano's score. Themes from that score provided the foundation for the concerto, which receives its world premiere this week in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's season-opening program with violinist Joshua Bell and conductor Marin Alsop.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | May 13, 1991
ONE LOOK AT FOX'S "Robin Hood" and you know this is an extraordinary TV movie. There's a simple reason for that -- it cost $15 million, about five times the amount usually spent on films for the small screen.And a lot of that money is visible, not in salaries paid to big stars, but in sumptuous location filming and impeccable attention to period detail. This "Robin Hood' has a look that makes you wish you were watching it on a big screen.Which is exactly the way the rest of the world will see it. And that's why Fox could spend so much money on it. It can get a big splash for its network in the United States and make the bucks back in theater ticket sales around the world.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | January 25, 2008
There's embarrassment and shame in this admission, but you need to know: We forgot about Woody Sauldsberry. He was the NBA's Rookie of the Year in 1958, just the second black man to win the award. He played for four NBA teams and later the Harlem Globetrotters. Retirement wasn't always easy. Diabetes claimed one of his legs and had its sights set on the other. When Sauldsberry died last year in Baltimore, there was no obituary in the next day's newspaper and no old highlights aired on that night's SportsCenter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | January 19, 2003
It's been suggested that the best film scores are the ones you hardly notice, those so perfectly in pitch with what's on screen that the effect is almost subliminal, serving the films without ever calling attention to themselves. But that's an oversimplification at best, at worst a cop-out that tries to establish the ordinary as the gold standard. For while it's true that many a perfectly serviceable film score goes largely unnoticed, the best take their movies and their audiences to new heights, underscoring -- but never overemphasizing, and certainly not obfuscating -- the emotion of the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | January 19, 2003
In the beginning, there was film. And sound. The two have been inseparable for roughly a century. But wait -- the first movies were silent, and "talkies" only arrived in the late 1920s, so what's this about a century of sound and film? It's simple. "Silent films were never silent," says composer and conductor John Williams, whose memorable film scores have earned him five Oscars. "There was always music to go with them." Once sound-on-film became possible, the marriage of the visual and aural arts blossomed even more, producing an extraordinary musical legacy.
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