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By Lou Cedrone | April 25, 1991
WIL Wheaton is very close to his manager. She happens to be his mother.''A manager should always have his client's best interest at heart, and who is more likely to do that than your mother?,'' Wheaton said. ''I'm extremely proud of her. She could have had a very successful career in real estate, but she gave it all up to spend time with her family and manage me full time.'' Wheaton and his mother, a former actress, were in Washington recently talking about his new movie "Toy Soldiers."The 18-year-old has a leading role in the terrorist melodrama that opens at area theaters on Friday.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
Forget the stars. The people I always wanted to talk to were the writers and producers who created the fictional worlds that became long-running TV series. One of the great pleasures of this job in my earlier days on the beat was going out to California, breaking away from my colleagues on the press tour and spending a long afternoon in a producer's bungalow on a studio backlot as he or she told me and my tape recorder how their visions became prime-time series. Whether it was Steven Bochco talking about “Hill Street Blues” or Larry Gelbart explaining the history of “M*A*S*H,” I always felt as if I was being let in on a great secret as to how entertainment, culture and sometimes even art was improbably created in the hyper-commercial world of Hollywood.
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By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
It's Stevie Wonder week at William McKinley High School. Or, "Wonder-ful," as Mr. Schu called it. We're celebrating big news, too! Rachel's excited about her callback for Fannie Brice in "Funny Girl. " Brittany got into college...whaaat?! And Mr. Schu re-proposed to Emma and they're getting married after regionals. Hopefully, for real this time. Plus, Artie was accepted to film school in New York. It's his dream come true, but he's not going. Huh? Meanwhile, it appears as though Kurt has developed a slight case of OCD since he's been in NYC. He taps his nose at 4:14 and 4:28 for good luck, which he needs because he's not-so-patiently awaiting his dad's cancer test results.
ENTERTAINMENT
By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
It's Stevie Wonder week at William McKinley High School. Or, "Wonder-ful," as Mr. Schu called it. We're celebrating big news, too! Rachel's excited about her callback for Fannie Brice in "Funny Girl. " Brittany got into college...whaaat?! And Mr. Schu re-proposed to Emma and they're getting married after regionals. Hopefully, for real this time. Plus, Artie was accepted to film school in New York. It's his dream come true, but he's not going. Huh? Meanwhile, it appears as though Kurt has developed a slight case of OCD since he's been in NYC. He taps his nose at 4:14 and 4:28 for good luck, which he needs because he's not-so-patiently awaiting his dad's cancer test results.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 2, 1998
A group of women sits in the searing African sun, their silence a potent, unmoving rebuke to the French soldiers who are holding them hostage for rice. An African princess, bathing in the ocean, is wordlessly captured by two of her Wolof brethren, who wish to protest their tribe's conversion to Islam by kidnapping their leader's daughter.These are just two of the striking images from "Emitai" and "Ceddo," two rarely seen films by the Senegalese director Ousmane Sembene, which open for a week's run tonight at the Orpheum Cinema in Fells Point.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | July 11, 1991
Add the name of John Singleton to the growing list of young black men who are distinguishing themselves as film directors.The list includes Spike Lee (''Jungle Fever''), Mario Van Peebles (''New Jack City'') and Matty Rich (''Straight Out of Brooklyn'').Singleton, all of 23, wrote and directed ''Boyz N the Hood,'' a gritty, unrelenting melodrama that focuses on a group of young black men who live in South Central Los Angeles, where Singleton was raised.Singleton's mother and father never married, nor did they ever live together.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
Forget the stars. The people I always wanted to talk to were the writers and producers who created the fictional worlds that became long-running TV series. One of the great pleasures of this job in my earlier days on the beat was going out to California, breaking away from my colleagues on the press tour and spending a long afternoon in a producer's bungalow on a studio backlot as he or she told me and my tape recorder how their visions became prime-time series. Whether it was Steven Bochco talking about “Hill Street Blues” or Larry Gelbart explaining the history of “M*A*S*H,” I always felt as if I was being let in on a great secret as to how entertainment, culture and sometimes even art was improbably created in the hyper-commercial world of Hollywood.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | January 18, 2007
Rocket Science, an unconventional coming-of-age yarn that the Johns Hopkins University grad Jeffrey Blitz filmed in Baltimore two summers ago, will premiere at this year's Sundance Film Festival, which kicks off today in Park City, Utah. "I'd be lying if I said I wasn't nervous," Blitz said of having his movie open at what has become the dominant festival for American independent films. "Part of that nervousness comes from presenting a film that, until now, has been seen only by a handful of other people, and part of the nervousness comes from the fact that it's Sundance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
"Lovely Molly," the horrific tale of a woman either demonically possessed or tragically insane, may be the film that makes Eduardo Sanchez someone other than one of the guys responsible for 1999's "The Blair Witch Project. " Which would be fine with the Maryland-raised filmmaker, whose movie gets its local premiere tonight to cap the first day of the 14th Maryland Film Festival. "I love being one of the guys that did 'Blair Witch,' but I'm really proud of 'Lovely Molly,'" Sanchez, 44, said about the film he shot last fall in and around Hagerstown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
For some eight years, Sheldon Candis nurtured a dream - to set and make a movie in his native Baltimore, one that reflected the sometimes mean, sometimes wondrous streets where he grew up. It sounds like a long time to dedicate to a single project, but Candis stuck with it. But Friday is the day he always knew would come. Throughout the country, audiences will be watching a film marked with the words, "Directed by Sheldon Candis. " Thanks in large part to a successful screening at last winter's Sundance Film Festival, "LUV" is opening on about 50 theater screens in 15 American cities (including Baltimore)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
For some eight years, Sheldon Candis nurtured a dream - to set and make a movie in his native Baltimore, one that reflected the sometimes mean, sometimes wondrous streets where he grew up. It sounds like a long time to dedicate to a single project, but Candis stuck with it. But Friday is the day he always knew would come. Throughout the country, audiences will be watching a film marked with the words, "Directed by Sheldon Candis. " Thanks in large part to a successful screening at last winter's Sundance Film Festival, "LUV" is opening on about 50 theater screens in 15 American cities (including Baltimore)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
"Lovely Molly," the horrific tale of a woman either demonically possessed or tragically insane, may be the film that makes Eduardo Sanchez someone other than one of the guys responsible for 1999's "The Blair Witch Project. " Which would be fine with the Maryland-raised filmmaker, whose movie gets its local premiere tonight to cap the first day of the 14th Maryland Film Festival. "I love being one of the guys that did 'Blair Witch,' but I'm really proud of 'Lovely Molly,'" Sanchez, 44, said about the film he shot last fall in and around Hagerstown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
In one video , a chubby guy in a Tony the Tiger costume holds a couple of puppets hostage. In another , sock puppets drive a human to madness. And in yet another video, a puppet's snoring is so powerful that people, puppets, anything in its vicinity, are sucked into his nose and transported to an alternative universe set in a dystopian, frigid landscape. That is the demented world of "Showbeast," a Baltimore Web series that marries puppetry, absurdist theater, stand-up, children's humor and experimental music, and has slowly acquired a cult following - fans include Dan Deacon and the band Beach House - one short YouTube video at a time.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | February 23, 2009
The Oscars went Tony with a vengeance this year: It was like a concept musical with a flaccid concept, saved only by a few game performers and emotion-packed awards badly in need of a Parisian riot or an exploding chandelier. The idea was that the evening would tell the story of the making of a movie from the blank page to post-production. Some of the effects that idea yielded were elegant, especially when Tina Fey and Steve Martin read pages of the nominated screenplays as the words appeared over scenes from the film.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | January 18, 2007
Rocket Science, an unconventional coming-of-age yarn that the Johns Hopkins University grad Jeffrey Blitz filmed in Baltimore two summers ago, will premiere at this year's Sundance Film Festival, which kicks off today in Park City, Utah. "I'd be lying if I said I wasn't nervous," Blitz said of having his movie open at what has become the dominant festival for American independent films. "Part of that nervousness comes from presenting a film that, until now, has been seen only by a handful of other people, and part of the nervousness comes from the fact that it's Sundance.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2002
In a Hamilton kitchen, a movie scene is rehearsed: Actress Gina Christine speaks with her wayward son Joe on the phone while she makes peanut butter sandwiches. "We haven't seen you in a while," she says. The conversation is terse, and significant for what's left unsaid. Christine hangs up and finishes making lunch for her two daughters. "The towel on your shoulder is an interesting touch," director Matt Porterfield says, pleased with the rehearsal. "I do that at home," Christine says.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2002
In a Hamilton kitchen, a movie scene is rehearsed: Actress Gina Christine speaks with her wayward son Joe on the phone while she makes peanut butter sandwiches. "We haven't seen you in a while," she says. The conversation is terse, and significant for what's left unsaid. Christine hangs up and finishes making lunch for her two daughters. "The towel on your shoulder is an interesting touch," director Matt Porterfield says, pleased with the rehearsal. "I do that at home," Christine says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
In one video , a chubby guy in a Tony the Tiger costume holds a couple of puppets hostage. In another , sock puppets drive a human to madness. And in yet another video, a puppet's snoring is so powerful that people, puppets, anything in its vicinity, are sucked into his nose and transported to an alternative universe set in a dystopian, frigid landscape. That is the demented world of "Showbeast," a Baltimore Web series that marries puppetry, absurdist theater, stand-up, children's humor and experimental music, and has slowly acquired a cult following - fans include Dan Deacon and the band Beach House - one short YouTube video at a time.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 3, 2001
School: The Story of American Public Education is PBS doing exactly what public television should be doing above all else: bringing context, clarity and perspective to an emotionally charged and often-misunderstood part of our shared national experience. The experience examined in this ambitious and richly researched four-part documentary premiering tonight is public education -- from the first classrooms in Colonial America with their emphasis on religion, to school vouchers and private contractors changing the face of public education today.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 2, 1998
A group of women sits in the searing African sun, their silence a potent, unmoving rebuke to the French soldiers who are holding them hostage for rice. An African princess, bathing in the ocean, is wordlessly captured by two of her Wolof brethren, who wish to protest their tribe's conversion to Islam by kidnapping their leader's daughter.These are just two of the striking images from "Emitai" and "Ceddo," two rarely seen films by the Senegalese director Ousmane Sembene, which open for a week's run tonight at the Orpheum Cinema in Fells Point.
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