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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
Take the classic film "Sunset Boulevard," slip in the witty "Guy Noir" feature from "Prairie Home Companion," and toss the whole mix into a swimming pool, and you might end up with something like "Mobtown Murder Mystery" — the latest production by Fluid Movement, one of Baltimore's zaniest organizers of performance art. "I'm a film noir nerd," said Valarie Perez-Schere, a founding member of Fluid Movement who helped organize the new show. "Last year, I saw a guy doing a dead-man float in the pool and thought, 'Oh, it's just like the opening scene of "Sunset Boulevard.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
Take the classic film "Sunset Boulevard," slip in the witty "Guy Noir" feature from "Prairie Home Companion," and toss the whole mix into a swimming pool, and you might end up with something like "Mobtown Murder Mystery" — the latest production by Fluid Movement, one of Baltimore's zaniest organizers of performance art. "I'm a film noir nerd," said Valarie Perez-Schere, a founding member of Fluid Movement who helped organize the new show. "Last year, I saw a guy doing a dead-man float in the pool and thought, 'Oh, it's just like the opening scene of "Sunset Boulevard.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 1, 1991
'Run'Starring Patrick Dempsey.Directed by Geoff Burrowes.Released by Hollywood Films (Disney).Rated R.*"Run" is on a treadmill. It sweats but it goes nowhere.It takes off from what might be called a film-noir conceit: the innocent man who, by a trick of fate, suddenly and inexplicably finds himself the object of a gigantic manhunt. But this is strictly junior-high film noir: It's so completely without subtext, nuance, depth or resonance that it could be etched on Tupperware as easily as photographed.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 29, 2008
Good guys gone bad and bad gals gone worse, claustrophobic cityscapes and never-ending nights, unsuspecting patsies and moral compasses gone hopelessly astray: Such is the world of film noir, that dense, gloomy cinematic genre that became all the rage in the years after World War II, as Americans began to grow weary, and wary, of the happy endings Hollywood had been selling them for so long. Tay Garnett's 1946 The Postman Always Rings Twice (8 p.m., TCM), based on the pulp novel by James M. Cain, was an early high point in the genre - and one of the few that would come from MGM, a studio that tended to back away from such lurid desecrations of the American dream.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | June 27, 1999
What is film noir? Is it a look? An era? A mood?Probably, it's all of the above, but TCM will explore the question to its fullest this summer with "Summer of Darkness," a 94-film series of classic noir films that begins Friday with a triumvirate of noir classics: "The Maltese Falcon" at 8 p.m., followed by "In a Lonely Place" at 10 and "High Sierra" at midnight.The series provides a good chance for fans to catch up on familiar favorites and discover overlooked gems. Some rarely seen movies include "Detour," by master of the form Edgar G. Ulmer; the heartbreaking "Woman in the Window," starring Edward G. Robinson; and Stanley Kubrick's "The Kill-ing," which features Sterling Hayden in a taut, nerve-rattling thriller.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 22, 1995
In 1972, then film critic Paul Schrader wrote a seminal essay on the dark and mesmerizing post-war American cinema of deceit, murder and betrayal known as film noir. He broke it down into three phases, the last of which, the "manic," had just ended -- or so he thought. He didn't know, of course, that he himself would write the last great film noir of the "manic" phase, "Taxi Driver," in 1976.He also didn't know that there was a fourth stage yet to come, one that has blossomed of late into full, gnarled bloom.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 28, 2002
As soon as you see the stylish set for Theatre Hopkins' production of Laura, you know you've slipped into a different world. It's not just that the Art Deco decor puts you in the 1940s. More significantly, the gray, black and white color scheme engulfs you in film noir. This is thoroughly apropos since the best-known version of Laura is Otto Preminger's classic 1944 black-and-white movie. Indeed, looking at Vera Caspary and George Sklar's play through a veil of nostalgia is probably the best idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | January 17, 2002
John Garfield could turn the act of cadging a smoke and savoring it into a romantic invitation. He epitomized the virile working-class antihero of the 1930s and '40s - an urban Joe with a well-worn chip on his shoulder, alternately resisting and giving into temptation and sometimes staging a scam or two himself. He was at his best in the 1946 movie version of Baltimorean James M. Cain's The Postman Always Rings Twice. As a cheerful hitchhiker who ambles into a Southern California roadside luncheonette and immediately falls in love with the proprietor's voluptuous wife (Lana Turner)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 3, 1994
In the world of film noir you're usually between a rock and a hard place, but poor Nicolas Cage's character Michael takes this common predicament a bit further: he's -- literally -- between a Red Rock and a hard place.Michael, a distillation of anti-heroes drained from the dregs left on the bar by James M. Cain and Jim Thompson, is the perfect embodiment of the noir character: a good-hearted chump who has the damnedest luck in the world. Michael's the sucker at the heart of John Dahl's vividly good old time, "Red Rock West," a neo-noir that opens today at the Charles.
NEWS
By David Zurawik | September 24, 2006
A SLIGHT CASE OF MURDER -- Warner Home Video / $19.97 William H. Macy has never delivered as finely crafted a comic performance as he does in A Slight Case of Murder. That's right, never - not even in Fargo (1996) - and he was superb in that feature film. The 1999 made-for-cable murder mystery becomes available Tuesday on DVD, and Macy's brilliant work is not the only reason to recommend it. There are outstanding supporting performances by Adam Arkin, James Cromwell and Felicity Huffman, Macy's wife and one of the stars of ABC's Desperate Housewives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | November 6, 2008
"This is a story about a bad smell. About a bunch of rich, powerful people pushing [and shoving] each other and everyone else to get a whole lot more money and power that they don't really need in the first place. It's about payoffs and favors and double plays and connections." Playwright George F. Walker, Filthy Rich If you think about it, the financial meltdown and giant bailout of Wall Street has the makings of classic film noir: There's corruption and greed, conspiracy and scandal, misappropriation of vast sums of money, and all manner of shady dealings that won't stand the light of day. So Everyman Theatre's production of Filthy Rich, which officially opens tomorrow, seems weirdly prescient.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | September 2, 2008
DVDS Starring Pierce Brosnan, Chris Cooper, Rachel McAdams, Patricia Clarkson - Directed by Ira Sachs - Sony Pictures - $28.96, $38.96 Blu-ray Tired of being married to his noble but unexciting (at least to him) wife, Pat (Patricia Clarkson), businessman Harry Allen (Chris Cooper) decides the only honorable thing to do is kill her - especially since naive young Kay (Rachel McAdams) is ready to pick up the slack. Only problem is, his best friend, Richard (Pierce Brosnan), also has a thing for Kay - and isn't sure Pat deserves to end up dead.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | August 22, 2008
The Charles Theatre's three-film James Bond retrospective ends this weekend with 1963's From Russia With Love, in which the evil S.P.E.C.T.R.E. seeks revenge on Bond (the great Sean Connery) for killing their star agent, Dr. No. With Daniela Bianchi as the beautiful Russian defector and Lotte Lenya as a former KGB agent with a lethal pair of shoes. Showtime is noon tomorrow, with encores set for 7 p.m. Monday and 9 p.m. Thursday. Tickets are $6 tomorrow, $8 other times. Information: 410-727-3456 or thecharles.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | August 31, 2007
Grindhouse, Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino's salute to the grade-Z movies shown primarily in on-their-last-legs moviehouses during the 1970s, kicks off a fall film festival at the Maryland Institute College of Art, co-sponsored by it and the Maryland Film Festival. Except for Monday's opening, the festival will run on Tuesdays, Sept. 11 through Nov. 13 (no movie Oct. 16). Showtime is 7:30 p.m. in Falvey Hall at MICA's Brown Center, 1301 Mount Royal Ave. Tickets are $10 a film; season pass $25; free for Friends of the Festival and MICA students, faculty and staff.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | August 24, 2007
A selection of film comedies, including a rarely seen silent feature from pioneering African-American actor Bert Williams, will be shown Thursday as part of the Jazz Film Series at An Die Musik Live, 409 N. Charles St. In addition to Williams' A Natural Born Gambler (1916), films will be shown featuring such comic legends as Charles Chaplin, Redd Foxx, Moms Mabley, Dick Gregory, Steve Allen and Richard Pryor. Showtime is 7 p.m., and tickets are $8. Information: 410-385-2638 or andie musiklive.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | August 10, 2007
An outdoor triple feature from Baltimore's connoisseur of bad taste, John Waters, is on tap tonight at Middlebranch Park, 3301 Waterview Ave. Part of the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema's Rolling Roadshow Tour, tonight's fest of Waters' best includes the nonmusical version of Hairspray (1988); Polyester (1981), an ode to life in suburbia starring Divine and Tab Hunter; and Desperate Living (1977), all about life in a garbage dump-cum-homeless shelter known as Mortville. As if that lineup isn't enough, the first 250 people to show up will get a free limited-edition Odorama card, essential for experiencing Polyester in all its glory.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
Beginning this weekend, the weekly revival series at the Charles Theatre turns its attention to film noir, those bleak, shadowy movies filled with easily duped guys led astray by morally questionable gals that dominated post-war America's movie screens. First up in the 14-week series is Otto Preminger's 1944 Laura, starring Dana Andrews as a detective who falls in love with a painting of a woman who may not be as dead as everyone thinks. The cast also includes Gene Tierney, Clifton Webb, Vincent Price and Judith Anderson.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 1, 1996
In the late 1940s, many filmmakers had abandoned the upbeat, glamorous look of pre-World War II movies to delve into the dark and gritty side of life.Years later, critics would coin the phrase "film noir" to describe this genre.Some of the better "film noir" efforts came from smaller studios such as the now long defunct Eagle-Lion. In 1948 and 1949, the company teamed director Anthony Mann with cinematographer John Alton, and the results were three movies -- "Raw Deal," "T-Men" and "He Walked by Night" -- that are excellent examples of the "noir" wave.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | August 8, 2007
The summer group show at C. Grimaldis Gallery offers a chance to review some of the most intriguing works from the past as well as glimpse the best of what's to come in future exhibitions. In recent years, Grimaldis has presented a growing number of photographers in addition to painters, sculptors and installation artists. Greek photographer Dimitra Lazaridou, who made her gallery debut in 2002, weighs in with a new installment of large-scale color images of distressed immigrant neighborhoods in her native Athens.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | July 13, 2007
The films of Sidney Poitier will be showcased in a free outdoor film series running Fridays through Aug. 17 in Clifton Park, at the band shell off St. Lo Drive. Tonight's kick-off film is Norman Jewison's Oscar-winning In the Heat of the Night (1967), with Poitier as a Philadelphia detective confronting bigotry and condescension while investigating a murder case in a small Southern town. The festivities begin at 8:30 p.m. Sponsored by Meridian Homes, the Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello Corp, Civic Works and the Baltimore Department of Recreation and Parks.
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