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NEWS
March 12, 2014
Kudos to Dawson Nolley for his exquisitely written letter ( "Film tax credits pay off for Maryland," March 3). As a lay person to the specifics of the TV and film production industry, I was certainly able to understand and empathize with the individuals and their families who are impacted. I think, too often, the "little guy" is overshadowed by the glitz and glamour associated with the celebrities involved in these productions, and it is certainly hard to worry about their lifestyles and salaries.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Erin Cox, Michael Dresser and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
By the time confetti fell in Annapolis on Monday night, state lawmakers had loosened marijuana laws, made Maryland the second state in the country to raise its minimum wage to $10.10 an hour and whittled their way through more than 2,600 bills considered during the 434th legislative session. The two major votes on marijuana decriminalization and increasing the minimum wage closed out the annual 90-day frenzy of lawmaking. Measures to create stricter penalties for drivers who cause fatal accidents while texting and to revamp Maryland's stalled medical marijuana program also received final passage.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 25, 2011
Whether he is handing out hard hits on the football field or delivering one-liners during interviews, Terrell Suggs is used to making plenty of noise at his day job (just ask NFL quarterbacks like Tom Brady). But the outspoken Ravens linebacker, a Pro Bowler in 2010, is quietly making a name for himself in the film industry. His production company, Team Sizzle Worldwide, just wrapped principal photography for his latest film project, “The Coalition,” and the trailer was released to the Internet last week . Suggs co-wrote the film -- which stars "227" actress Jackee Harry and Denyce Lawton from Tyler Perry's "House of Payne” -- along with director Monica Mingo.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
The potential pool of cash available for the film industry shrank by $3.5 million in the final minutes of the General Assembly session, leaving lawmakers asking: Is $15 million enough for "House of Cards" to stay? The Netflix political thriller, which filmed some of its second season in the Maryland State House, received more than $26 million in taxpayer money over the past two years to film in the state. When the O'Malley administration offered only $4 million in tax incentives for filming this year, the production company pushed back filming for its third season and threatened to break down its sets and move elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
Netflix's Capitol Hill drama "House of Cards" may receive millions more in tax credits to continue filming in Maryland, now that the General Assembly has agreed to make more funding available. But the local arts community may not like the politics. To secure the extra funding, the General Assembly authorized state economic developers to dip into a $2.5 million pot of money called the Special Fund for the Preservation of Cultural Arts. It was created in 2009 to support arts organizations.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
For a politician, the opportunity to bring jobs and economic prosperity to the public by subsidizing the production of the TV drama "House of Cards" in Maryland just sounds too good to pass up ( "Senator faults administration effort to keep 'House of Cards,'" Feb. 21). That's the kind of thing that elections are won on. When the politicians finally wake up to the reality that they have been handing more taxpayer funds to the movie industry - $15 million last year - than the industry puts back into the economy, they are shocked to get the movie people's extortion note: Pay up or we move on. " The made-for-TV film industry is nomadic and its jobs are temporary, low-wage jobs.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
Say "Film Wage Rebate Grant Program" and your eyes might film over. But for businesses relying on Maryland's TV and film industry, wage rebates can mean employee health care and retirement plans. The program means jobs, its beneficiaries also would testify. Now, say Annapolis - that's the recently released film about the U.S. Naval Academy that was filmed not in Baltimore but in Philadelphia. It has become the poster movie for Maryland's struggling entertainment industry. "That's embarrassing to us," said Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. on the corner of Guilford Avenue and Federal Street.
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | October 17, 1991
Gloom is everywhere. But sunshine may be just around the corner.That's film-industry talk. Hollywood loves to speak in cliches -- and in contradictions. Depending upon whom you listen to -- or whom you read -- the movie business either is or isn't in trouble.That it was a disappointing summer is undeniable -- Bruce Willis' "Hudson Hawk," Julia Roberts' "Dying Young" and Kathleen Turner's "V.I. Warshawski" didn't begin to meet critical or financial expectations. In fact, "Hudson Hawk," the season's biggest loser, so far has earned a paltry $16 million, compared to TC a budget estimated at between $48-$58 million.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 1, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- In an unusual pastoral letter, Cardinal Roger Mahony, the archbishop of Los Angeles, has challenged the entertainment industry to adopt general guidelines for the depiction of violence, sex, family life and the treatment of women.Implicitly criticizing the movie industry for an avalanche of films that "pander to baser instincts," Cardinal Mahony, who leads the largest archdiocese in the nation, went out of his way to insist that he rejects censorship or a return to the kind of production code, specifically governing how film makers deal with sex and other issues, that dominated the movie industry for decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Indira A. R. Lakshmanan and Indira A. R. Lakshmanan,Boston Globe | March 28, 1999
BOMBAY, India -- Fans of the world's largest film industry were unlikely to tune in for the Academy Awards. After all, their favorite stars carried off their trophies more than a week ago right here in Bollywood.Bollywood, as Bombay is known to fans of Indian cinema, is the capital of an industry that produces some 800 feature films a year in several Indian languages. That's well over double the number made in Hollywood, and almost one-fifth of the world's total. Revenue from India's colorful song-and-dance extravaganzas and melodramas surpasses $1 billion a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
Netflix's Capitol Hill drama "House of Cards" may receive millions more in tax credits to continue filming in Maryland, now that the General Assembly has agreed to make more funding available. But the local arts community may not like the politics. To secure the extra funding, the General Assembly authorized state economic developers to dip into a $2.5 million pot of money called the Special Fund for the Preservation of Cultural Arts. It was created in 2009 to support arts organizations.
NEWS
March 12, 2014
Kudos to Dawson Nolley for his exquisitely written letter ( "Film tax credits pay off for Maryland," March 3). As a lay person to the specifics of the TV and film production industry, I was certainly able to understand and empathize with the individuals and their families who are impacted. I think, too often, the "little guy" is overshadowed by the glitz and glamour associated with the celebrities involved in these productions, and it is certainly hard to worry about their lifestyles and salaries.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
For a politician, the opportunity to bring jobs and economic prosperity to the public by subsidizing the production of the TV drama "House of Cards" in Maryland just sounds too good to pass up ( "Senator faults administration effort to keep 'House of Cards,'" Feb. 21). That's the kind of thing that elections are won on. When the politicians finally wake up to the reality that they have been handing more taxpayer funds to the movie industry - $15 million last year - than the industry puts back into the economy, they are shocked to get the movie people's extortion note: Pay up or we move on. " The made-for-TV film industry is nomadic and its jobs are temporary, low-wage jobs.
NEWS
February 3, 2014
The death this weekend of acclaimed actor Philip Seymour Hoffman from an apparent drug overdose has left his fans and colleagues in the film industry devastated by the loss of a great talent at so young an age. Mr. Hoffman was 46 when he was found dead in his New York apartment Sunday with a hypodermic needle stuck in his arm and packets of what appeared to be heroin nearby. His tragedy was a reminder that heroin addiction has many faces, from the rich and famous to people of severely limited means.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
Lawmakers approved $25 million in tax credits for the film industry Tuesday, expanding and extending a program that was set to expire in 2014. Tuesday's vote sends to Gov. Martin O'Malley a bill that increases subsidies to film companies by $17.5 million over this year. O'Malley proposed the increased tax credit, along with credits for biotechnology and cyber security industries. Since the credits were first approved in 2011, they have gone to several projects including the popular Netflix series "House of Cards" that stars Kevin Spacey and was filmed in Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
Look out for Paul Shields in the background of a Central Park scene in the forthcoming Netflix series "House of Cards. " Dagmar Wittmer, owner of the Washington-based talent company Central Casting, said Saturday she can picture the 25-year-old Laurel man as an extra, maybe with a bike, a dog or a Frisbee at a look-alike version of the New York City landmark. Filming for the first season of the series starring Kevin Spacey is being held in the Baltimore region, including Harford County.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
When a set decorator needed a rusty mop bucket as a prop in the feature film "Liberty Heights" last month, the operator of a local antiques mall went to her utility closet and pulled out the perfect model.Elaine Ezell, president of AAA Antiques Mall Inc. in Hanover, has been doing business with the film industry for several years, working from lists to provide items quickly.Each film that comes in represents $15,000 or $20,000 in revenue to the 450 antiques dealers at her mall, she said. This year, she estimates, the film industry has brought in at least $50,000.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 4, 2003
DUBLIN, Ireland - Cigarette tax, up 30 cents starting today, pushing the price above $6 a pack. Ireland's wealthiest people will pay about $2,000 more a year for welfare programs for the country's worst-off. Gasoline tax? That's increasing 7 cents per liter immediately. And to save the government money, no more retiring for public workers until they turn 65. Ireland's finance minister, Charlie McGreevy, ticked off the tax increases and spending cuts one by one yesterday as he stood before lawmakers to outline the country's 2004 budget.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 25, 2011
Whether he is handing out hard hits on the football field or delivering one-liners during interviews, Terrell Suggs is used to making plenty of noise at his day job (just ask NFL quarterbacks like Tom Brady). But the outspoken Ravens linebacker, a Pro Bowler in 2010, is quietly making a name for himself in the film industry. His production company, Team Sizzle Worldwide, just wrapped principal photography for his latest film project, “The Coalition,” and the trailer was released to the Internet last week . Suggs co-wrote the film -- which stars "227" actress Jackee Harry and Denyce Lawton from Tyler Perry's "House of Payne” -- along with director Monica Mingo.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2009
The issue may have been serious: raising awareness of problems facing Maryland's film industry. But, that didn't mean that an event for that cause couldn't be fun. All you needed to see were the smiles on the faces of folks like: Betsy Jiranek, American Land Title Corp. president, and her husband, Drew Jiranek, Jiranek Co. principal; Lorraine Whittlesey, Private Sector Productions artistic director; Ann Stief, Bryn Mawr teacher, and her husband, Charlie Stief, Wells Fargo senior vice president; and Judy Turner, retired Verizon analyst.
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