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NEWS
July 21, 1993
MARBELLA, Spain -- Film director Jean Negulesco, 93, a Romanian whose films included "How to Marry a Millionaire" and "Three Coins in a Fountain" died here Sunday of heart failure and will be buried tomorrow in this Mediterranean coastal resort town where he lived since the late 1960s.Born Feb. 29, 1900, in Craiova, Romania, he came to the United States in 1927.His last directing credit was "The Invisible Six" in 1970. His first movie credit was "Singapore Woman" in 1941. He was known initially for his hard-hitting romantic melodramas, but critics disparaged much of his later work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
We are supposed to be living in a new golden age of television. But you would never know that from the new series this summer. Despite months of hype about all the big names like Steven Soderbergh and Halle Berry who were going to be behind and in front of the cameras, none of the series even feels like silver at the halfway point of the season. Big names alone do not make for golden TV. In fact, sometimes the big names are only using TV to pass off inferior work that couldn't get big-screen funding.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1998
Stephen M. Milius, an award-winning film director and editor who directed hundreds of commercials and corporate videos during his nearly 25-year career, died Monday from complications of pulmonary fibrosis at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver.Milius, who was 48 and lived in Owings Mills, was awaiting a lung transplant when he died.Since 1993, Mr. Milius had been associated with Big Shot Productions in Baltimore, where he planned and directed a variety of videos and films, including commercials, corporate-industrial training videos and infomercials.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
If you saw a disheveled, clearly despondent 66-year-old man hitchhiking, would you pick him up? Would you pick him up if you realized he was John Waters? Two springs ago, Baltimore's most unrepentant degenerate set out on a mission of discovery. Beginning on Charles Street, not far from his home, Waters would hitchhike all the way to his San Francisco condo, following Interstate 70 most of way. There would be little in the way of advance planning; he'd be relying totally on his thumb and the kindness of strangers.
FEATURES
By STEPHEN HUNTER and STEPHEN HUNTER,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 17, 1996
John Schlesinger broke the mold.The portly, pugnacious British film director, a recent visitor to Washington to plug his new film, has once again insisted on confounding critics and citizens alike, going his own way, smashing all precedent, and parting company absolutely with his peers and acolytes.And what mold is that?Why, it's the mold originally set by Alfred Hitchcock, and followed more or less intact by other great Brits, such as Sir Carol Reed, Sir David Lean, Tony Richards and later by another generation, including Ridley and Tony Scott, Michael Apted and so forth.
NEWS
December 23, 1999
Robert Bresson, 98, a film director who helped redefine French cinema by focusing on images rather than dialogue, died Saturday in Paris. He was best known for his austere approach and helping pave the way for the New Wave movement.The son of a military officer who once studied to be a painter, he often used untrained actors and coached them to speak in monotones. In the 1959 film "Pickpocket," widely regarded as his best film, Mr. Bresson pared down the compulsive art of lifting wallets to its barest psychological elements.
NEWS
September 3, 1996
Christine Pascal,42, an actress and film director who made her movie acting debut at 21 and directed her first film at 25, has died, her husband's production agency said yesterday. The agency, Armedia, founded by Ms. Pascal's husband, Richard Boner, did not give the cause of her death, which it said occurred late Friday or early Saturday. Ms. Pascal began her film career in 1974 and directed her first film four years later. She won the 1992 Louis Delluc Prize for directing "Le Petit Prince a Dit" ("The Little Prince Said")
NEWS
June 24, 1995
Carlo Pietrangeli, 82, an archaeologist whose 17-year tenure as head of the Vatican Museums culminated with the restoration the Sistine Chapel, died yesterday. Despite a long illness, he had continued in his post as director-general of the museums, where Michelangelo's frescoed ceiling graces the chapel. He was appointed to the top museum post in 1978 by Pope John Paul I.Atef el-Tayeb, 47, a film director who was part of the new realism trend in Egyptian cinema, died yesterday in Cairo after heart surgery.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2009
With a James Bond party theme, it was no wonder the Hyatt Regency ballroom looked like a movie set. The room was swagged in white chiffon, with clusters of white couches and cube tables along the sides. Red velvet ropes cordoned off the back third of the room, which was elevated for the VIP section. "There's a bottle of vodka on every table here," said real estate developer Patrick Turner, noting the VIP bottle service. No set would be complete without its stars. And there were plenty, thanks to host Baltimore Ravens player Terrell Suggs.
NEWS
July 12, 1992
David Schaffer Epstein, 73, a film director and screenwriter, died after a heart attack Tuesday in Connecticut. He had directed educational films and documentaries on many political and public-affairs issues, including atomic energy, the creation of Israel as a state and the post-war reconstruction of Eastern Europe. As the liaison between the Ford Foundation and the "Omnibus" series on CBS television, he directed and produced films on Frank Lloyd Wright, the Quincy Adams family and other subjects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
During a rather frantic Hollywood party one night in 1933, a film director pontificates on the heavily-laden-with-historic-woe type of actors he wants to portray the slaves in his new antebellum epic. A black maid named Vera Stark, eager to get into the movies and determined to catch the director's eye, transforms herself - in less than an instant, it seems - from confident to meek, articulate to mumbling, upright to stooped-over. It's hilarious and pathetic all at once. Portrayed by the compelling Dawn Ursula in Everyman Theatre's production of the 2011 Lynn Nottage play "By the Way, Meet Vera Stark," this stardom-seeking servant understands the game almost too well.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Playwright, film director and LGBT cult favorite Del Shores will be in Baltimore on Sunday for a meet-and-greet with fans, a costume contest and a double billing of two of his films: "Sordid Lives" and "Southern Baptist Sissies. " The ticket-only event was put together as an early offering from B'More QFest , which is hosting a four-day film and media festival in Baltimore in June, of which Gay in Maryland is a sponsor. The event Sunday is being called the "Southern Tragic Humor Double Bill" -- perhaps for obvious reasons.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
A new film premiering in the Baltimore region on Friday features the actor Wendell Pierce, a familiar face to many here, as a conflicted husband and father who has an affair with a teenage boy he meets online. Pierce, best known for his portrayal of Detective Bunk Moreland in the acclaimed Baltimore-based series "The Wire," says in production materials for the film "FOUR " that his role is one "people would never expect" him to play. "I expect people to say, 'Why did Wendell participate in the emasculating of a black man?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Harvey G. Alexander, who founded and served as executive director of the Baltimore Film Festival and also read poetry on WBJC-FM, died Nov. 23 of pulmonary edema at Franklin Square Medical Center. He was 77. "I first got to know him in 1964 at Martick's. They wouldn't let me in, but I got to know him behind Martick's back in the alley," said film director and writer John Waters. "Harvey was an eccentric intellectual and a real bohemian, but always very friendly," said Mr. Waters.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
SPOILER ALERT: This story reveals features of the plot. Baltimore-born film director Barry Levinson has said his new eco-horror movie, "The Bay," about a Chesapeake Bay turned deadly by environmental abuse, is "80 percent factual. " Bay scientists and one activist who've seen it say the film, which opened Friday, does touch on some very real issues affecting the bay. But they say the artistic license taken with the facts and the gore that makes it a horror movie may overwhelm any back story about what's wrong with the Chesapeake.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2009
With a James Bond party theme, it was no wonder the Hyatt Regency ballroom looked like a movie set. The room was swagged in white chiffon, with clusters of white couches and cube tables along the sides. Red velvet ropes cordoned off the back third of the room, which was elevated for the VIP section. "There's a bottle of vodka on every table here," said real estate developer Patrick Turner, noting the VIP bottle service. No set would be complete without its stars. And there were plenty, thanks to host Baltimore Ravens player Terrell Suggs.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 22, 2006
A celebrated writer doesn't always have the makings of a writer-director. Steven Zaillian earned his reputation as a screenwriter with Schindler's List, but as a writer-director his work is often clumsy or simplistic; even at the script stage, it's as if he's writing down to his limited powers as a film director, or else, as a director, is not getting whatever life or complexity he has on the page. In Searching for Bobby Fischer (1993), his writing-directing debut, Zaillian sheared away the fascinating, complicated mesh of real-life characters in Fred Waitzkin's autobiographical book about being the parent of a chess prodigy, and constructed a hollow fairytale about the need to lead a free, well-rounded life.
NEWS
April 13, 2007
M. CARROLL RAVER, writer, photographer, cinematographer and film director, died Monday April, 9th. He was 67. A native of Carroll County, Md., he attended the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill where he was a National Collegiate Athletic Association champion fencer. Early in his career, while at J. Walter Thompson Advertising (NY), he served as a copywriter, producer and director working on television commercials for national clients including Ford. Later, as an award-winning director and cameraman, he directed commercials for Hertz, General Motors, the U.S. Army, BMW and others.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 31, 2009
Humpday mixes hilarity with upset as the irresistible force of male pride meets the immovable object of sexual identity. In the attention-getting plot, two straight men agree to have sex for the camera in order to win at Seattle's annual home-made porn festival, HUMP! - or, as it's called in the movie, Humpfest. At the end of each festival, the emcee, sex columnist Dan Savage, hands out awards and burns the offerings onstage. Director Lynn Shelton's observation of manly competition and fellow feeling lifts the blatant plot hook into funnier, more mysterious realms of human behavior.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | June 6, 2008
With Standard Operating Procedure (opening today at the Charles), Errol Morris, who helped start America's documentary revolution with such celebrated films as The Thin Blue Line (1988), investigates a subject that already has, in his words, "a lot of fingerprints on it." He explores the physical and psychological torture at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, brought to light four years ago by a stream of abhorrent photographs. Morris persevered despite his knowledge that other print and movie journalists were laboring on the story, confident that his highly personal and idiosyncratic approach would produce unexpected results.
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