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By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
A 250-year-old farmhouse, stuck at the end of a long, rutted driveway, with creaking doors, splintered stairs, snakeskins in the basement and a mysterious gaping hole hidden beneath one of the outbuildings. Sounds like the perfect setting for a horror film, right? That's what the makers of "The Possession" thought, too, when they first saw the Hagerstown home that location scouts found for their 20-day film shoot, wrapping this weekend in Western Maryland. And they were right. "This house had its own creepy kind of things that it brought along," says director Eduardo Sanchez, a Marylander who shot to fame as the first-time writer-director of 1999's "The Blair Witch Project," which brought in more than $140 million at the U.S. box office.
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BRYNA ZUMER and MATT BUTTON | September 9, 2014
The makers of "House of Cards" don't show their hand often, but Aberdeen officials were tipped off that the hit Netflix is being filmed in their city at least part of this week. The show was expected to be filmed at the Bernard J. Tobin American Legion hall next to Aberdeen City Hall late Tuesday afternoon into the evening, according to security people who were helping with the set up earlier around the hall. During a meeting at city hall Monday afternoon, Aberdeen Police Department Lt. Fred Budnick told city council members to expect the film crew in the neighborhood the following day. Budnick said part of the street would be blocked off near the legion, city hall and Festival Park, but he didn't expect traffic to be seriously affected.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
A Baltimore police officer who was killed in October when his cruiser slammed into the back of a fire engine was speeding at 71 mph and most likely was distracted by a film crew on the opposite side of a highway, the final investigative report concludes. Officer Thomas Portz Jr., 32, did not suffer a medical problem, and officials found no mechanical defects in the police car, a 2009 Chevrolet Impala. The report says Portz, a 10-year veteran assigned to the Western District, was not wearing his seatbelt.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Pet lovers around the country tune in to the PBS series, “Shelter Me,” which celebrates shelter pets with uplifting stories about them. Soon, the series will feature homeless dogs and cats in Baltimore. On Tuesday, June 24, Aimee Sadler, a nationally recognized animal trainer specializing in behavioral problems, will be at Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS) hosting a doggie playdate, and a film crew will document the day for a future episode of the show. Sadler will work with shelter staff members on the best ways to hold playdates between their dogs, who often don't know each other very well, if at all. The goal is to reduce frustration for both animals and people and increase the happiness quotient for everyone.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
All the Peabody Conservatory library had to do was look its elegant self yesterday while a film crew set up lights, cameras and microphones to shoot a romantic comedy starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan.The landmark on tree-lined Mount Vernon Street was the centerpiece for two scenes with Ms. Ryan, who plays a reporter at The Sun destined to meet Mr. Hanks, an architect in Seattle, at the end of the movie.The crew will be filming "Sleepless in Seattle" in Baltimore through Thursday. Mr. Hanks is not in town.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doris Toumarkine and Doris Toumarkine,The Hollywood Reporter | December 30, 1994
In what New York City officials are calling a first, the city police department and Mayor's Film Office have paved the way for Columbia Pictures' big-budget "Money Train" to shoot in Times Square on New Year's Eve.Approximately 300 extras will be joining the 300,000-plus throng of revelers and multitude of news and broadcast crews expected tomorrow night at one of the world's most celebrated NewYear's Eve gatherings.The shoot won't involve the film's stars, Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson, but will capture footage for a key chase sequence at the end of the film when Mr. Snipes, a good-guy decoy cop, chases his adversaries on a motorcycle.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | September 24, 1993
Only in the film industry do four days equal 15 minutes.Filming on a 15-minute Internal Revenue Service video, designed to help small-business owners understand their tax obligations, wound up in downtown Westminster yesterday.Cast and crew from Action Productions Inc. of New York, Cooper Productions of Columbia and Steve Yeager Films of Baltimore began work on the project Monday."It's sort of like watching grass grow," the sound technician commented as the cast and crew taped a three-minute scene for the fourth time at the law offices of Lennon and Miller on Main Street.
NEWS
By Edward Colimore and Edward Colimore,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 1997
SHARPSBURG -- With musket barrels gleaming and flags flying, a long column of blue-clad soldiers snaked down the hillside, then paused at the edge of a country lane.Lying in heaps on the road before them were the bodies of the "dead" and "dying," alongside guns, canteens and haversacks. "Wounded" men writhed on the ground.And the cameras rolled, capturing scenes for a movie that will be shown at the national historic battlefield and will be part of a television documentary.No one had seen that sight in 135 years - not on this once-blood-soaked Civil War battleground where more American casualties occurred than on any other single day in U.S. military history.
FEATURES
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2000
Tony White paces across the back of the Baltimore Convention Center, flipping open his cellular phone to call his office. "Carol," says the spokesman for Mayor Martin O'Malley, "have you heard from the NBC people?" Today is a big day for the O'Malley administration. A television news crew is en route from Washington to film a profile of Baltimore's boy wonder politician to air next month on the "Today Show" during the Democratic National Convention. The piece is one of several that will highlight future players in each political party.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
In this video, President Obama and Maryland's senior  - sorry, make that junior - senator, Ben Cardin, pop into the Texas Ribs and BBQ in Clinton. You can read more about the president and senator's visit on the always informative Obama Foodorama website. At just about 1:05 in the video , a woman starts barking for some people to push some back some other people, including the Secret Service. Is she with the president, the restaurant the film crew?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
A voice called out, "Cameras ready. " Another voice responded, "Sound. " Then a third: "Action. " With that, the Everyman Theatre Film Studios came to life one recent morning. OK, not a real film studio, but awfully close. An upstairs space at Everyman's Fayette Street building was transformed into a genuine movie-producing facility as part of the process of putting the company's next production onto the stage. "By the Way, Meet Vera Stark," a comic/serious work from 2011 by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Lynn Nottage, is receiving its Baltimore/Washington premiere.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
Sculptor Toby Mendez, the man whose bronze statues immortalized Brooks Robinson, Cal Ripken Jr. and four other Orioles greats in Camden Yards ceremonies spread over the past six months, has certainly enjoyed his time in the spotlight. But now it's his dad's turn. The exploits of the elder Mendez, Tony, are at the center of the movie “Argo,” about a daring CIA-Canada rescue mission that got six Americans out of Iran during the 1979-1981 hostage crisis by convincing authorities they were part of a Canadian film crew.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
Baltimore Councilman Nick J. Mosby has Tweeted himself into a movie role. He'll be playing himself -- a guy who Tweets a lot. With just over 500 followers, the District 7 representative might not be the biggest presence on Twitter. But he's apparently being followed by the right people. He'll be one of 140 personalities from the millions on the social media site included in a documentary called "Follow Friday. " The documentary portrays filmmaker Erin Faulk as she travels the country to meet and interview 140 of the people she follows on Twitter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2012
Matters of faith continue to divide people in dreadful ways, but there has always been at least one thing that religions have in common - the urge to express belief through art. That's a point driven home in a sumptuous 90-minute documentary by Baltimore filmmaker Robert Gardner airing this week on PBS. "Islamic Art: Mirror of the Invisible World," narrated by Susan Sarandon, provides a welcome look into a cultural legacy little known and little appreciated...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2012
Baltimoreans and Marylanders have become blase about actors being in their midst, along with bellowing directors, film crews, blocked-off streets filled with Hollywood's iconic caravans of trucks, trailers and spotlights, and sidewalks choked with zig-zagging electrical cables. We've finally caught up with Los Angeles, where locals consider it exceedingly bad form to stop and gawk at a film shoot or pester celebrities. In Baltimore, first it was Barry Levinson who aroused our interest in filmmaking when he turned back the clock to 1959 during the filming of his comedy-drama "Diner" here in 1982, filling the streets with vintage 1950s cars and actors in period clothing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
In this video, President Obama and Maryland's senior  - sorry, make that junior - senator, Ben Cardin, pop into the Texas Ribs and BBQ in Clinton. You can read more about the president and senator's visit on the always informative Obama Foodorama website. At just about 1:05 in the video , a woman starts barking for some people to push some back some other people, including the Secret Service. Is she with the president, the restaurant the film crew?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 10, 2011
If you've seen a black SUV getting towed up Charles Street Tuesday with an attractive brunette and driver still inside, rest assured they are not the latest victims of Baltimore's municipal towing scandal . That's Julianne Moore in the back seat, playing former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin in "Game Change," an HBO movie about the 2008 presidential election being filmed in Baltimore . The actor who plays her driver can't be trusted to...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2004
Bending over backward to accommodate Hollywood, Baltimore plans to close the Hanover Street bridge Saturday and possibly Monday so a production company can stage a scene in which a boat appears to land on the structure. The city's Department of Transportation announced yesterday that the bridge between South Baltimore and Cherry Hill will close at 3 a.m. Saturday to allow Los Angeles-based Revolution Studios to film a scene for the movie XXX: State of the Union. The span - formally called the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Bridge - will reopen from 6 a.m. to midnight Sunday for Ravens game traffic, but then could close for another 24 hours if the film crew still needs the bridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 10, 2011
If you've seen a black SUV getting towed up Charles Street Tuesday with an attractive brunette and driver still inside, rest assured they are not the latest victims of Baltimore's municipal towing scandal . That's Julianne Moore in the back seat, playing former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin in "Game Change," an HBO movie about the 2008 presidential election being filmed in Baltimore . The actor who plays her driver can't be trusted to...
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
A Baltimore police officer who was killed in October when his cruiser slammed into the back of a fire engine was speeding at 71 mph and most likely was distracted by a film crew on the opposite side of a highway, the final investigative report concludes. Officer Thomas Portz Jr., 32, did not suffer a medical problem, and officials found no mechanical defects in the police car, a 2009 Chevrolet Impala. The report says Portz, a 10-year veteran assigned to the Western District, was not wearing his seatbelt.
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