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By SYLVIA BADGER | May 13, 1994
Things are beginning to roll again at the Maryland Film Commission. That's the word from commission director Michael Styer, the keynote speaker at the Maryland/DC Production Guide's new business symposium. Dozens of actors, agents, directors, cameramen and others who work in and around the film/video industry in Maryland gathered at the lovely old Senator Theatre Wednesday morning to network and catch up on the latest news.After a dry spell, Styer says contacts and hard work are beginning to pay off again.
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NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 8, 2006
As many who have been stuck in some monumental traffic jams know, this is a busy time for film crews in Baltimore with two big-studio action films - Live Free or Die Hard and Shooter - filming on city's streets. Some of the thanks, or blame, for bringing Bruce Willis and his entourage to town goes to Hannah Lee Byron, director of the Baltimore City Film Office. In two years on the job, she has not only used events like the Baltimore Screenwriters Competition to raise the profile of local filmmaking, she has made the Division of Film, Video and Television in the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts a key partner with the Maryland Film Office in drumming up regional business from Hollywood and independent producers.
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FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | October 2, 1991
The Maryland Film Commission's efforts to aid local filmmakers and aspiring screenwriters will be curtailed because of newly ordered state budget cuts, which could also affect the agency's ability to attract feature film productions here, its director said yesterday.The commission -- which has overseen the filming of three dozen movies in the state since 1979 -- lost three of its five staff positions as part of the deep and widespread cuts announced by Gov. William Donald Schaefer. In addition, a Maryland State Arts Council program to provide long-term financial and organizational support to arts groups was slashed by $250,000, or nearly 70 percent, and more than $500,000 in previously withheld MSAC grants to arts groups and county arts councils were eliminated.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 23, 1998
For some filmgoers, the 1998 edition of the Sundance Film Festival will be remembered as the year rock-star-turned-clothes-horse Courtney Love succeeded in booting a film about her life with Kurt Cobain off the roster. For others, it will be remembered as the best organized and technically smooth festival in a very long time.More than 13,000 executives, filmmakers, fans and hangers-on have descended on Park City, Utah, for the 10-day festival, where features and documentaries compete for coveted awards and unknown filmmakers show their mettle; where studios pick up the next big thing dirt cheap (they hope)
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | May 22, 1991
The Maryland Film Commission is looking for hundreds of good spots to shoot a movie.In a daylong tour of Carroll's highways and back roads, the commission's five-person staff saw plenty of spots that could end up on the silver screen someday."
NEWS
August 7, 1991
The Carroll County Fuel Fund will be participating with Baltimore Fuel Fund Inc. in sponsoring Fuel Fund Day at 1:30 p.m. Aug. 24 at Memorial Stadium in Baltimore during an Orioles game against the Minnesota Twins.The Carroll County group is a committee of the Human Services Programs of Carroll County Inc.Fuel Fund Day gives baseball fans a chance to see the Birds in one of their last games at the stadium and also to assist low-income families with energy-related needs.Tickets are $7.50 for upper reserved seats behind first base and must be reserved by Aug. 14.Checks for tickets can be made payable to the Human Services Programs Inc. and mailed to P.O. Box 489, Westminster, Md. 21157.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | March 16, 1995
Scene 1; Take 1: A radiant young actress bounds up the church steps. Strains of organ music fill the air. Suddenly, in the midst of "Here Comes the Bride," a bystander blows a foghorn. . . . Cut!The director tries the shot again. Once more, the foghorn blares. The disruption continues until a $200 payment is arranged for the horn's "rental." Finally, silence descends on the location. But by then the light has changed. The bride has lost her glow. And overtime costs have accrued.Scenes such as this are growing more common in California, film industry representatives say, as an increasing number of opportunists prey on on-location film crews with a harass-for-cash extortion scheme.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 17, 1994
Nothing like a good, old-fashioned Maryland crab feast to get the cast and crew of "Homicide" back into their Baltimore mode.Ned Beatty, Richard Belzer, Yaphet Kotto, Andre Braugher, Daniel (of the well-known acting family) Baldwin and Clark Johnson were among the stars of the series who came to the rooftop party on the Fells Point Recreation Pier. If chemistry has anything to do with a success, this NBC series should go great guns. I noticed a lot of affectionate greetings among the returning cast and crew.
NEWS
November 18, 1990
Imagine a Hollywood movie company coming to Havre de Grace to make a blockbuster film starring actors like Mel Gibson and Meryl Streep.Sound far-fetched? Maybe not.The state Film Commission came to Harford County on Thursday to scout sites for movies, television shows and commercials.Although no film projects are targeted for the county at the moment, the commission wants to be ready just in case, said Jay Schlossberg-Cohen, director of the commission.After the tour Thursday, commission members agreed Havre de Grace, with its bridges, historic structures and picturesque view of Chesapeake Bay and the Susquehanna River, is a top prospect for movie locations, Schlossberg-Cohen said.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | May 13, 1995
NBC will announce its fall schedule Monday and it's expected to include the renewal, in some form, of "Homicide."In an effort to keep its plans for next fall from rival ABC, which is scheduled to release its schedule on Tuesday, NBC has been secretive about its lineup."
NEWS
December 29, 1996
THE TV series "Homicide" is quintessential Baltimore. But as film production in the city has increased, Baltimore is dressed up to portray Washington, New York, Pittsburgh, Cleveland or Columbus, Ohio.In one forthcoming motion picture, Mount Vernon Square at night even pretends to be Paris!Baltimore may not be Hollywood on the Patapsco, but to a growing list of screen artists it represents a versatile location that is both uncomplicated and low-cost.Filming permits and local cooperation are easy to get. Professional talent is abundant: Producers can come to Baltimore with just the big stars and hire most everyone else locally.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | June 28, 1996
A "Welcome to Bawlmer, Hon" party seemed a perfect way to welcome the cast and crew of "Washington Square" to town. You can expect to see movie cameras rolling through mid-August. In this film, Baltimore doubles for New York City circa 1850.The party was given by the Producers Club, a private non-profit group which helps the Maryland Film Commission attract film and television productions to Maryland. One of the perks of membership is to be invited to parties like this one held at City Life Museums.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 28, 1996
THE SUNDANCE FILM Festival, started by Robert Redford to tout exciting, low-budget films that may have gotten short shrift from Hollywood's high-powered distributors, has become a "must attend" event for movers and shakers in the world of film.The 10-day festival, which ends today, has for years lured members of the Maryland Film Commission and the Maryland Producers Club to Park City, Utah, to hobnob with filmmakers and tout Maryland as a great place to make films.This year was no exception for Producers Club members Blair Barton, owner of the Maryland/DC Production Guide, and David Cordish, whose Cordish Co. has been selected to undertake the redevelopment of the ailing Power Plant at the Inner Harbor.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | May 13, 1995
NBC will announce its fall schedule Monday and it's expected to include the renewal, in some form, of "Homicide."In an effort to keep its plans for next fall from rival ABC, which is scheduled to release its schedule on Tuesday, NBC has been secretive about its lineup."
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | March 16, 1995
Scene 1; Take 1: A radiant young actress bounds up the church steps. Strains of organ music fill the air. Suddenly, in the midst of "Here Comes the Bride," a bystander blows a foghorn. . . . Cut!The director tries the shot again. Once more, the foghorn blares. The disruption continues until a $200 payment is arranged for the horn's "rental." Finally, silence descends on the location. But by then the light has changed. The bride has lost her glow. And overtime costs have accrued.Scenes such as this are growing more common in California, film industry representatives say, as an increasing number of opportunists prey on on-location film crews with a harass-for-cash extortion scheme.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1995
An article about movie stars in Baltimore that appeared in yesterday's editions incorrectly identified the network on which the series "Homicide" can be seen. The series airs on NBC.The Sun regrets the errors.Anne Bancroft was seen last week working out with weights at the Harbor Court Hotel.Holly Hunter and Robert Downey Jr. were spied entering Scarlett Place on Pratt Street. They presumably headed for the sixth-floor office of Jodie Foster, director of their romantic comedy, "Home for the Holidays," which is shooting here this month (and also stars Ms. Bancroft)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1995
An article about movie stars in Baltimore that appeared in yesterday's editions incorrectly identified the network on which the series "Homicide" can be seen. The series airs on NBC.The Sun regrets the errors.Anne Bancroft was seen last week working out with weights at the Harbor Court Hotel.Holly Hunter and Robert Downey Jr. were spied entering Scarlett Place on Pratt Street. They presumably headed for the sixth-floor office of Jodie Foster, director of their romantic comedy, "Home for the Holidays," which is shooting here this month (and also stars Ms. Bancroft)
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | June 17, 1993
If you get a thrill whenever you see Maryland locations in movies and you have $500 to spare, Jed Dietz has a deal for you.Mr. Dietz, general partner of a film investment partnership, has launched The Producers Club, a nonprofit group formed solely to lure movie companies and their dollars to Maryland.Perhaps the first such effort in the country, the club charges each member $500 to promote Maryland as the place to make movies. In return, the members get a chance to hobnob with film industry celebrities and attend premieres and private screenings.
NEWS
December 25, 1994
Safe communities, good schools and jobs, jobs, jobs. That's Gov-elect Parris Glendening's agenda for the coming four years. So his presence earlier this month at a luncheon honoring James G. Robinson, chairman and CEO of Morgan Creek Productions, was hardly a surprise.Mr. Robinson's story is a classic tale of entrepreneurial achievement, parlaying success in earlier business ventures into one of Hollywood's most powerful independent film studios. Maryland has shared in his rise. Two of his recent features -- "Silent Fall" and "Major League II" -- were filmed in Maryland, enriching the Maryland economy by $30 million.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 17, 1994
Nothing like a good, old-fashioned Maryland crab feast to get the cast and crew of "Homicide" back into their Baltimore mode.Ned Beatty, Richard Belzer, Yaphet Kotto, Andre Braugher, Daniel (of the well-known acting family) Baldwin and Clark Johnson were among the stars of the series who came to the rooftop party on the Fells Point Recreation Pier. If chemistry has anything to do with a success, this NBC series should go great guns. I noticed a lot of affectionate greetings among the returning cast and crew.
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