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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 29, 1998
The first edition of Baltimore's Queer Film and Video Festival will feature some familiar names: "Leather Jacket Love Story," Rondo Mieczkowski's romantic drama about two mismatched men who find love in the Silver Lake suburb of Los Angeles, has been a favorite on the festival circuit recently, and Cheryl Dunye's "The Watermelon Woman" and "Paul Monette: The Brink of Summer's End," about the late author and activist, were both acclaimed when they were released...
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | June 5, 2007
Like many an aspiring auteur, Skizz Cyzyk found his college's filmmaking tools extremely helpful. So helpful, in fact, he extended his tenure at Towson University. "I actually went there eight years, so that I could have access to equipment," says Cyzyk, class of '92, who went on to found Baltimore's Microcinefest and is now programming manager of the Maryland Film Festival. It was experiences like his that inspired the Creative Alliance to establish the just-opened CAmm Cage and Media Lab. True, it doesn't look like much -- a 600-square-foot piece of cavernous studio space in a reconfigured East Baltimore movie theater.
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By Ann Hornaday | June 4, 1998
Baltimore's Queer Film and Video Festival was born of that mother of so many good ideas: self-interest.Chris Lines, a graduate film student at Towson University, had just finished his short film, "Acceptance," seeing to the details of post-production and entering festivals, when a chilling thought occurred to him. "I thought, 'What if it doesn't get in?'" Lines recalled recently. "I'll create a festival! Baltimore hasn't had one in a while - the last one was in 1995, as part of the Baltimore Film Forum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | January 19, 2003
Fullwood Foundation Cheery shades of red were everywhere at the "15th Annual Fullwood Foundation Benefit and Recognition Breakfast." The Martin's West ballroom was decked out in red, black and white -- as were the more than 40 people being honored for their community service. They each wore a dazzling medal around their necks with ribbons in the same three colors. Fullwood Foundation volunteers, who helped the 1,800 guests find their seats, were dressed in crimson. Obviously, many of the guests knew red, in particular, was the color of the hour.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1995
Here is the schedule for the remaining films for the Baltimore Film Forum's 26th annual Baltimore International Film Festival.* "The Forbidden Quest" (Netherlands, 1993), tonight at 7:30* "Rhythm Thief" (United States, 1994), tonight at 9:30* Festival closing night, Maryland winners from the 1995 Independent Film and Video Makers' Competition, Sunday, April 7:30 p.m.Tickets are $6, $5 for BFF members, BMA members, seniors and students. They can be bought from the Film Forum or at the BMA box office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | August 6, 2000
What's a mid-summer downpour when you've got people to meet, networking to do? Even a weather-related downtown traffic jam couldn't keep some 45 folks away from Harborview's South Harbor Tavern. They came for "Networking Happy Hour: The Sequel" -- a production of Women in Film and Video of Maryland, a nonprofit, all-volunteer organization dedicated to promoting women in the film, video and related industries. Those who braved the soggy streets were rewarded with good food, good company and good chances of meeting people in Maryland's film and video industry.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | September 18, 1991
Western Maryland College will sponsor a state film and video business fair on Saturday.The first-ever event will be geared toward students interested in careers and educational opportunities in Maryland's film and video industry.The fair, "Maryland On Screen," is intended to inform high schooland college students that the industry is alive and well in the state."We've designed 'Maryland on Screen' as an annual event to provide a forum for students of all ages to see that the film and video industry is thriving in our state," said Jay Schlossberg-Cohen, director of the Maryland Film Commission, part of the state Department of Economic and Employment Development.
NEWS
August 7, 1991
The Carroll County Fuel Fund will be participating with Baltimore Fuel Fund Inc. in sponsoring Fuel Fund Day at 1:30 p.m. Aug. 24 at Memorial Stadium in Baltimore during an Orioles game against the Minnesota Twins.The Carroll County group is a committee of the Human Services Programs of Carroll County Inc.Fuel Fund Day gives baseball fans a chance to see the Birds in one of their last games at the stadium and also to assist low-income families with energy-related needs.Tickets are $7.50 for upper reserved seats behind first base and must be reserved by Aug. 14.Checks for tickets can be made payable to the Human Services Programs Inc. and mailed to P.O. Box 489, Westminster, Md. 21157.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 4, 1998
That wasn't Harrison Ford at the Key Bridge Monday night, but it was the next best thing: the tail-end of a plane sticking out of the Patapsco was put there in the service of "Random Hearts," a political thriller he's currently filming in the Washington, D.C., area. Director Sydney Pollack used the bridge to film an early sequence in the movie, in which an airplane crash sets off a series of events. The project will visit a cabin in Prince George's or Howard County for a week later on in the schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1994
A dozen graduates of the film and video program at Towson State University are coming back to school tonight to show off their work."Generally speaking, we've been working hard without looking back a lot," says Peter Lev, a TSU film professor who has organized the TSU Retrospective Film & Video Festival, being held in the Fine Arts Center of the campus."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 2, 2001
You won't catch any of the current nominees, but dozens of past Academy Award winners will be spotlighted on TCM this month, as the cable channel stages its annual celebration of all things Oscar. The festival, called "31 Days of Oscar," runs the entire month, filling TCM's schedule with Oscar-winning and Oscar-nominated movies. And while it includes all the big winners - "Gone With the Wind," "Casablanca" and "Ben-Hur" - the real fun comes from ferreting out lesser-known gems, films that rarely turn up on must-see lists and aren't shown nearly as frequently as the big guns.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | August 6, 2000
What's a mid-summer downpour when you've got people to meet, networking to do? Even a weather-related downtown traffic jam couldn't keep some 45 folks away from Harborview's South Harbor Tavern. They came for "Networking Happy Hour: The Sequel" -- a production of Women in Film and Video of Maryland, a nonprofit, all-volunteer organization dedicated to promoting women in the film, video and related industries. Those who braved the soggy streets were rewarded with good food, good company and good chances of meeting people in Maryland's film and video industry.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2000
The Ann Arbor Film Festival is one of the best-regarded traveling festivals of independent and experimental short films in the United States. The University of Maryland, Baltimore County will play host to the festival today and tomorrow in room 306 in the Fine Arts Building. Twenty-three new films by emerging filmmakers from around the world will be presented at the festival. Screenings are at 7 p.m tonight and 6 p.m. tomorrow. Admission is $2 ($1 for students). For more information, call 410-455-2959.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 3, 2000
There's still room at this evening's seminar with filmmaker Peter Rose at the Maryland Institute, College of Art. Rose, who has been making avant-garde films, tapes, installations and performance works for more than 30 years, will present older and recent works and will discuss the future of media-making with film programmer Vicki Westover. Works that will be on view include Rose's seminal 1981 film "the man who could not see far enough," as well as "Requiem," the first installment of a three-part video/sound opera that Rose is currently producing.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 7, 1999
Baltimore's Queer Film and Video Festival started the old-fashioned way. "It was shameless self-promotion," says festival founder Chris Lines, laughing shyly.Of course, another term for shameless self-promotion is enlightened self-interest. Last year, Lines, a graduate film student at Towson University, needed a venue for his short film "Acceptance." So rather than search for a local festival to show it in, he started the festival himself.Baltimore's Queer Film and Video Festival unspooled in June 1998 with 33 films, and Lines says, with some surprise, that about 1,000 people attended during the 10-day run. Even more surprising, he adds, was that many of them came from the suburbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | August 1, 1999
Mission: To promote women in the film and television industries. Members are involved in various occupations within film, television and related industries, including producers, directors, stylists, casting directors and agents, actors, entertainment attorneys, composers, accountants, screenwriters, photographers and technicians. Founded in 1988, Women in Film and Video of Maryland is a founding chapter of Women in Film and Television International, a new umbrella organization for 40 WIFTI chapters worldwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | January 19, 2003
Fullwood Foundation Cheery shades of red were everywhere at the "15th Annual Fullwood Foundation Benefit and Recognition Breakfast." The Martin's West ballroom was decked out in red, black and white -- as were the more than 40 people being honored for their community service. They each wore a dazzling medal around their necks with ribbons in the same three colors. Fullwood Foundation volunteers, who helped the 1,800 guests find their seats, were dressed in crimson. Obviously, many of the guests knew red, in particular, was the color of the hour.
FEATURES
June 12, 1998
After an intermission for Baltimore's Queer Film and Video Festival, "The Passion of Joan of Arc" (1928) and "Gertrud" (1964) have returned to the Orpheum in Fells Point. The two classics, by Danish master Carl Theodor Dreyer, play through Sunday. On Monday, "Twilight," Robert Benton's thriller starring Paul Newman, Susan Sarandon and Gene Hackman, falls on the landmark theater. Coming up at the Orpheum: a Frank Sinatra double feature with "Anchors Aweigh" and "The Manchurian Candidate." Clear your calendar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,sun film critic | July 18, 1999
It was surreal at Cannes in May, when they were on a panel moderated by critic Roger Ebert, with Ron Howard at one end of the dais, Spike Lee on the other and John Sayles in between.And it was surreal at Sundance in January, when "The Blair Witch Project" made its triumphant world premiere at the most influential film festival in America."The whole thing was surreal," recalled Myrick over breakfast the morning after the Charles event. "[You've] just come from Orlando, you're knee deep in snow and you're looking at this huge line outside for your film and you're like, 'Wow.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 9, 1999
Baltimore artist Lee Boot believes that there's an art show in everyone's head. Surely there's an art show in his, as he has prodigiously demonstrated in his work, which combines sculptural installation, performance art and video to whimsical and provocative effect.Bringing his finely honed sense of irony to bear on such elements as the human brain, raw meat, light bulbs and Bic pens, Boot makes pithy commentaries on the art world and the world at large, from Cartesian notions of reality to the mysterious workings of the corporate mind.
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