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By Joanne E. Morvay | April 28, 1999
* Item: Gorton's Homestyle Baked Fillets* What you get: 2 fillets* Cost: About $4* Preparation time: 21 to 23 minutes in oven* Review: From the outset, let me say that no one will ever mistake these frozen pollock fillets for fresh fish. But on a busy night, faced with a choice between these fillets with their homey toppings and the plain old breaded fillets that often seem to be more breading than fish, I'd pick these hands down. We tried the Garlic Butter Crumb and the Broccoli and Cheddar flavors.
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By Liz F. Kay | May 31, 2011
Here are more factors to consider the next time you buy fish at a store or order it at a restaurant. Seafood can be a great choice for health reasons, and it's tasty to boot. But overfishing threatens some fish stocks and contaminents that accumulate in some species requires us to limit how much we can eat -- particularly women and young children. But even following the "Super Green" recommendations from the Monteray Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program won't help you if the fish is mislabeled in the seafood case --- replaced with options that are cheaper or more readily available.
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By Joanne E. Morvay | August 11, 1999
Item: Mrs. Paul's Premium Grilled FilletsWhat you get: 2 filletsCost: About $4Preparation time: 3 to 4 minutes microwave, 14 to 17 minutes conventional ovenReview: Nutritionists urge us to eat more fish, and these frozen grilled fillets seem to be a step in the right direction. Individually packaged, they offer a fresh fish flavor that surprised me. We tried the Grilled Salmon with Creamy Dill sauce and the Grilled Tuna with Sesame Teriyaki sauce. The teriyaki was a little too syrupy for my taste, but the dill sauce was perfect.
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By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | February 27, 2008
Mirin is a sweet, syrupy wine made from rice. It's particularly fine with grilled foods. When brushed over the hot food, the mirin becomes a glossy glaze; think of those skewers of chicken yakitori you get at the local Japanese restaurant. Mirin is low in alcohol and meant for cooking, not drinking. Here, its mild, honeyed flavor enhances the salmon's richness while melding well with the salt of the soy and fish sauces. The sweetness also plays up the smoky char of the grill pan. You can find mirin, fish sauce and soy sauce at Asian and specialty-food markets and, increasingly, in supermarkets.
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By Joanne E. Morvay | March 15, 2000
Tasty sauces coat fillets of chicken Item: Easy Beginnings Chicken Breasts What you get: 4 servings Cost: About $5 Preparation time: 1 minute in microwave, 10 to 12 minutes in conventional oven Review: These chicken breast fillets are not exactly the "restaurant quality" advertised on the label (unless you frequent restaurants that serve chicken breasts that have been processed to include rib meat). Easy Beginnings fillets are handy nonetheless. Fully cooked and coated with tasty sauces, they heat quickly.
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 12, 2004
Several weeks ago in Paris, at a small Left Bank eatery called Les Ormes, I ordered Sole With Pistachios. Every bite was pure bliss, so I chatted with the waiter and took notes about this splendid main course. The sole had been prepared a la meuniere, which translates to "in the style of the miller's wife." This simple technique calls for thin fish fillets to be dipped in milk, dusted with flour, then quickly sauteed in butter until golden. A drizzle of melted butter, a squeeze of lemon and a sprinkle of parsley are final touches.
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By Tracy Sahler and Tracy Sahler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 14, 2001
Inspired by the baklava she makes for her church, Sally A. Brassfield of California, Md., wrapped rockfish fillets inside crunchy phyllo dough to triumph over nine other finalists to win the fourth annual Maryland Rockfish Cooking Contest. Shallots and garlic helped flavor her hearty - although labor-intensive - dish, while pine nuts gave her Savory Phyllo-Encrusted Rockfish an exotic crunch. She won $500 and a silver bowl at the contest held Feb. 3 at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center in Ocean City.
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By Maria Hiaasen | July 2, 1997
Item: Mrs. Paul's Grilled FilletsWhat you get: Two fillets (7.4 ounces)Cost: $2.89Time to prepare: 20 minutes conventional oven, or 5 minutes in the microwave for one fillet, 8 minutes in the microwave for two fillets.Review: Summer's here. Grilled fish sounds great, but who has time to stand in line for fresh fillets? Mrs. Paul's solves your time crunch. OK, so these aren't swordfish steaks, but these fillets of pollock come nicely seasoned and prepare consistently in either conventional oven or microwave.
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By Joanne E. Morvay | August 8, 2001
Item: Gorton's Skillet Fillets What you get: 2 fillets Cost: About $2.75 Nutritional content: Traditional Seasoned -- 220 calories, 13 grams fat, 2 grams saturated fat, 700 milligrams sodium, 13 grams carbohydrate, 3 grams sugars Preparation time: 11 to 14 minutes on stove top Review: Let me start by saying that this is the strangest style of fish I've ever eaten. The "fillets" appeared to be pieces of fish molded into two long, skinny pieces -- like miniature two-by-fours made from fish.
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By Maria Hiaasen | May 6, 1998
Item: Mrs. Paul's Premium Fillets in SauceCost: About $4Servings per container: 2Preparation time: 14 to 17 minutes in conventional oven, 5 to 7 minutes (for two fillets) in the microwaveReview: Sure, the picture on the box looked like grilled fish from a restaurant, but I found nothing premium about these fillets. Fact is, I found them downright awful. I sampled both the teriyaki tuna and the honey mustard salmon. The sauce on each tasted inexplicably sweet and overpowered the fish. I have another bone to pick; I followed the instructions, but both varieties of fish turned out overcooked.
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By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | February 6, 2008
Thai peanut sauce and coconut milk add an intriguing flavor to tilapia. For this recipe, they are simmered to gently coat the fish. Peanut sauce is the base for many Thai dishes and is made from roasted peanuts, soy sauce and spices. I choose a thick one when it is available. Coconut milk is made by mixing shredded coconut with boiling water, letting it steep and then straining it. Fortunately, both peanut sauce and coconut milk are available ready-made. Serve this dish with basmati rice.
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By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | October 10, 2007
Olives and fennel are two common ingredients of the Mediterranean region. I love to combine them with fresh fish, and though we may not get the same species found in that sun-dappled area of the world, we have our choice of plenty from our own coasts. I find halibut works well with these simple flavors, but red snapper or even fresh-water trout can shine here. Team the dish with ripe tomatoes, tossed in a salad, and a lemon tart from the bakery. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
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By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,Chicago Tribune | June 20, 2007
This dinner is the result of an experiment I recently conducted, making a last-minute menu for drop-in friends using some of my favorite flavors. Wild king salmon wasn't available at the market, so I picked up frozen sockeye salmon instead. In place of the usual sprinkle of sea salt and freshly ground pepper, I concocted a light Asian blend of ginger, citrus and soy to add a bit more flavor to the previously frozen fillets. I carried the pineapple theme from the entree (delicious, with its bites of fish and beans and rice)
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By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | April 18, 2007
Just because a dish is considered classic doesn't mean it never can change. Take this recipe for pan-fried fish. My mother used to make it with store-bought bread crumbs and haddock, but she switched to flounder when haddock grew scarce. Now my daughter enjoys it made with petrale sole from California and Japanese panko bread crumbs. I love the subtle changes this dish has undergone over the years. It's a tasty reminder of how a dish can be adapted to evolving tastes and market forces without losing its flavorful essence.
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By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | February 28, 2007
Into the Vietnamese Kitchen By Andrea Nguyen Curry Cuisine Fragrant Dishes From India, Thailand, Vietnam and Indonesia By Corinne Trang DK Publishing / 2006 / $25 I gew up in a household of Indian immigrants, so I'm a born and bred curry aficionado. So the red chili peppers and the bold pink "Curry Cuisine" lettering on this cookbook were an immediate draw. The book includes 180 recipes from more than a dozen regions of the world, including India, Thailand, Myanmar and Laos. If you're not a fan of the traditional soupy, fiery curries of South Asia, don't worry.
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By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | February 21, 2007
Like the armchair traveler who is content to read about daring adventures, prepared Asian stir-fry sauces hold out the promise of new and exotic tastes - without the dangers of deciphering ingredient labels in a foreign language. But sadly, when it comes to flavor, something is usually lost in the translation. Unlike classical French sauces and reductions, Asian sauces are relatively simple to pull together. Whisk together a few uncomplicated ingredients and skip the MSG (monosodium glutamate, an allergy trigger for some people)
NEWS
October 5, 2005
POACHED SALMON HAS A wonderful air of elegance on a buffet. It's every bit as elegant with smaller fillets for weeknight dinners, and makes an easy entertaining entree. This method of poaching is almost effortless. Its very gentle heat keeps the fish moist and succulent. It's equally good hot or cold. Menu Suggestion Steeped salmon with dill-caper sauce Cucumber spears Sliced tomatoes Fresh berries and melon Steeped Salmon With Dill-Caper Sauce 4 servings -- Total time: 30 minutes 2 cups water 1 cup dry vermouth or dry white wine, such as chardonnay 1 each: lemon, fresh dill branch 1 tablespoon salt 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns 4 fillets salmon, about 6 ounces each 1 tablespoon each: minced fresh dill, capers 1/2 cup regular or low-fat mayonnaise Heat the water and wine in a large, heavy skillet over high heat.
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By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | April 18, 2007
Just because a dish is considered classic doesn't mean it never can change. Take this recipe for pan-fried fish. My mother used to make it with store-bought bread crumbs and haddock, but she switched to flounder when haddock grew scarce. Now my daughter enjoys it made with petrale sole from California and Japanese panko bread crumbs. I love the subtle changes this dish has undergone over the years. It's a tasty reminder of how a dish can be adapted to evolving tastes and market forces without losing its flavorful essence.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | November 1, 2006
Cooking en papillote means baking something -- fish fillets often -- on a bed of aromatic vegetables in a pouch of parchment or foil. The contents of the pouch steam in their juices, their flavors mixing. We love the romance of en papillote: First, you cut a giant heart from the parchment or foil. Then, when you serve, each diner opens his own personal pouch to get a fragrant poof of steam. Very cool. Robin Mather Jenkins writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,NEWSDAY | October 25, 2006
Even avowed fish lovers often shy away from cooking seafood at home. Chief among the reasons for this piscaphobia are worries about freshness and confusion about cooking methods. But two studies released last week give fish fans new incentive to move past those doubts in the name of good health. A Harvard School of Public Health study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that eating one to two servings of fish a week could reduce by a third the chances of dying from a heart attack, and that the health benefits of eating seafood strongly outweigh the risks.
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