Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFill
IN THE NEWS

Fill

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 30, 2009
The port of Baltimore has sent its last haul of dredge material from the Baltimore Harbor and Chesapeake Bay channels to Hart-Miller Island, and the spit of land near the Back and Middle rivers in Baltimore County will enter the final phase of its conversion into a wildlife refuge and recreational area. Some 100 million cubic yards of material has been formed into 1,100 acres during the past 25 years. The island is now home to more than 200 species of birds, other animals and plants. Thousands of people also use it for boating, fishing, camping and other activities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
The Baltimore Sun will follow Franklin's Steven Smothers, Gilman's Ellison Jordan and McDonogh's Eric Burrell on the recruiting trail as they try to decide over the next year which college will be the best fit. This is part one in an occasional series. Steven Smothers' cell phone started dancing just a few seconds past midnight on Sept. 1. The Franklin junior had switched his phone to vibrate, but he didn't ignore it, knowing college football coaches could begin contacting Class of 2016 prospects via text message, email and social media immediately after midnight.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 18, 2010
I'm not part of the black helicopter crowd. I don't think the census will be used to track my movements or steal my DNA. Still, I don't see any advantage in filling out the form and returning it. My county knows who and where I am, and I trust that locally my family is accounted for. I religiously pay my taxes, so someone somewhere knows I exist. I don't want the federal government spending any more money on my behalf. I don't want them to spend money on my census form, I don't want them to pay people to come to my house, I don't want them to pay someone to tabulate the data from my form.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Industry growth and a tide of employee retirements in Baltimore's transportation sector will create or leave open thousands of jobs by 2020, but local job seekers aren't prepared to fill them, according to a study released Monday by the Opportunity Collaborative. Low-income residents lack the needed technical training or have criminal records that make them ineligible for the jobs, according to the study by the coalition of state agencies, local governments, universities and nonprofits tasked with plotting a course toward sustainable economic growth for the Baltimore region.
NEWS
August 7, 1991
C
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | July 4, 1993
A state order that Spencer Sand & Gravel Inc. stop all surface mining prompted Harford County officials to investigate and cite the rubble landfill for zoning violations, an administration official said Friday.The county also is looking into possible grading violations at the 55-acre rubble fill, said Jefferson L. Blomquist, deputy attorney for the county.County zoning authorities have cited the rubble fill operator for mining outside the permitted area and for improper land filling, concrete reprocessing and top soil reprocessing, Mr. Blomquist said.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | July 12, 1992
U.S. Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest has urged state environment officials to carefully study an Abingdon rubble fill in a letter supporting citizens who have questioned operations at the dump.In the letter to the state Department of the Environment, the 1st District congressman expressed concern over health and environmental threats posed by the Spencer Sand & Gravel Inc. rubble fill."I am aware of a concerted effort by Harford citizens to find answers to these troubling problems surrounding the Spencer fill," Mr. Gilchrest said in the letter.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | February 10, 1993
Rubble landfills, the object of intense criticism from local lawmakers and residents worried about contamination, shouldn't be run by private owners interested mainly in profits, a state senator says.Sen. William H. Amoss, a Democrat whose District 35A includes portions of Harford and Cecil counties, has introduced a measure that would require new rubble fills to be run by counties or a regional waste management authority.In Harford, the Northeast Waste Management Authority, a public corporation created to help subdivisions cope with waste disposal, already operates the waste-to-energy incinerator on the grounds of Aberdeen Proving Ground.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 5, 2000
The Maryland Lottery has signed a contract with eLottery Inc. that will let customers fill out Lotto and Big Game subscription forms online, the company announced yesterday. The service builds on an existing one that lets lottery customers download a subscription form, fill it out and return it through conventional mail. Customers will still have to send checks through the mail or drop them off at a lottery office because state law forbids the agency from accepting charge cards for ticket purchases.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 30, 1997
I LIKE THE QUOTE from the developer who justifies a massive housing and commercial development along the banks of the Potomac River as "in-fill." I hadn't seen or heard the term before it showed up in The Sun over the weekend. Edward Podboy, president of the company that wants to build a city of 12,000 people on one of the largest expanses of woodlands remaining on the Potomac, said such a development does not constitute suburban sprawl because it will occur in an area already infested with suburban sprawl.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Johns Hopkins trauma surgeon Albert Chi gave a talk last year to families about advanced prosthetics that would someday benefit their children who were missing hands. But when a parent asked what was easy, available and affordable now, Chi was at a loss. After focusing on the latest artificial limb technology, he began to hunt for more basic options. Like many researchers, entrepreneurs and even artists in recent years, he turned to the 3-D printer. With one his wife bought him for Father's Day, sheets of colored plastic, and free designs and advice found online, he made a hand for about $20. "One of the first kids we fitted was a 2-year-old," Chi said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young came under fire Wednesday as critics charged that he pushed his favored candidate through a committee appointed to fill a vacant council seat. A committee of community leaders, appointed by Young, listened to more than four hours of testimony Tuesday evening from 14 candidates for the seat - and in less than five minutes agreed to nominate Federal Hill Neighborhood Association President Eric T. Costello, who was supported by Young.
NEWS
September 8, 2014
City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young is expected Tuesday to formally begin the process of finding a replacement for former Councilman William H. Cole IV, who resigned to become head of the Baltimore Development Corporation. Much is at stake for Mr. Cole's district, which encompasses a diverse array of neighborhoods and the city's central business district, but much is also at stake for the council itself to show that it has learned from the debacle that ensued last time it had a vacancy.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Chykie Brown has heard the chatter both inside and outside the Ravens' facility. He knows what people are saying about the Ravens' banged-up secondary and how it could lead to the demise of the team. He also understands that he and whoever is left from the Ravens' cornerback group has a big opportunity Saturday night to ease some of the angst. "If people put us on that pedestal, we have to step up and answer the challenge," said Brown, the Ravens' fourth-year player. "I'm always up for a challenge.
HEALTH
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
As People's Community Health Centers' financial problems mounted and the closure of the group's clinics became inevitable, government and health officials formulated a plan to get a replacement clinic up and running in Anne Arundel County. In a matter of weeks, Chase Brexton Health Care opened a branch in Glen Burnie, in temporary office space and with staff borrowed from other clinics. As soon as the doors opened July 25, patients showed up needing help. "We hit the ground running," said Katie Meara, director of operations for the new Chase Brexton clinic on Aquahart Road in Glen Burnie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Otakon is many things, all of them having to do with Japanese and East Asian popular culture. But most of all -- at least to outsiders -- it's all about the costumes. Check out the area around the convention center Friday morning, before the fan convention's 8:30 a.m. opening, and you'll see hundreds of people lined up outside, few of them wearing anything normal. The whole scene resembles an anime artist's sketchbook come to vivid life. Visit the Inner Harbor over the weekend, or hang around outside nearby Oriole Park at Camden Yards, and the selection of magical girls, evil spirits, ninja warriors, faeries and Pokemen on display feels almost otherworldly.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | January 9, 2008
The owner of Laurel Park wants to fill in 4 acres of wetlands in the Patuxent River watershed as part of a multimillion-dollar redevelopment to modernize the floundering thoroughbred racetrack. The nontidal wetlands that would be filled in are near Route 198, said Walter Lynch, the project's lead architect. That is where a swath of heavily wooded wetlands buffers the racetrack complex from the state highway, near the line between Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties. Lynch said Laurel Park's parent owner, Magna Entertainment Corp.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Reporter | April 2, 2007
Gas station attendants don't usually boast doctorates. So why does Ilya Goldberg, a genetics researcher at the National Institutes of Health, spend his Saturdays hanging out beside a fuel pump, filling up cars? Because it's not gasoline. It's biodiesel, a fuel pressed from soybeans. And Goldberg is one of 50 believers in the Baltimore Biodiesel Collective who volunteer their time and money to sell this alternative fuel every weekend from an organic garden store in Baltimore. Nearly pure vegetable fuel is not available at normal gas stations in the Baltimore area.
SPORTS
By Aaron Oster | August 5, 2014
For the past few months, the WWE's top priority has been to raise subscriptions for the WWE Network. That was kicked into overdrive on Monday, as RAW was turned into an infomercial for the Network. From the very beginning of the show, Triple H was repeating over and over again that for $9.99 you can get the Network, on which could you watch the upcoming SummerSlam. For one segment, it was kind of funny. However, the broadcasters ran with it so much that it seemed like every segment and match featured at least one mention of subscribing to the WWE Network.
NEWS
By Nate Greenslit | August 5, 2014
In March 2014, for the first time in over 40 years, a study of the therapeutic benefits of lysergic acid diethylamide - more commonly known as LSD - was published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. It showed that LSD-assisted psychotherapy significantly reduced anxiety in individuals with "life-threatening diseases," including Parkinson's disease and breast cancer . This study is part of a recent wave of clinical research on psychedelic substances like LSD and psilocybin - the psychoactive component of "magic mushrooms.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.