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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 11, 2003
Motions in a murder case against a Columbia banker accused in the stranglings of his two preschool-age daughters were delayed yesterday after lawyers said they were still waiting for the results of a psychiatric examination. Robert Emmett Filippi, 44, entered a plea in January of not criminally responsible, saying he was insane when he allegedly killed Nicole Filippi, 4, and her 2-year-old sister, Lindsey, in June. A court-ordered evaluation by a psychiatrist at the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center has not been completed, Filippi's lawyer, James B. Kraft, told Howard Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney during a hearing yesterday.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 10, 2003
A memorial service was held yesterday at a Columbia day care center for two Hickory Ridge girls who were killed by their father last year. The service marked the one-year anniversary of the deaths of Nicole and Lindsey Filippi. The girls, ages 4 and 2 respectively, were strangled by their father, Robert Emmett Filippi. He pleaded guilty May 12 to two counts of first-degree murder in a deal that spared him a death sentence. Filippi wrote in court documents that he killed the girls to hurt his wife, Naoko Nakajima.
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NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2003
A Columbia banker accused of strangling his two preschool-age daughters is pleading insanity in the case. Robert Emmett Filippi, 44, filed notice this month that he is pleading not criminally responsible "by reason of insanity" in the June deaths of 4-year-old Nicole Filippi and her 2-year-old sister, Lindsey. Filippi, who has been charged with two counts of first-degree murder, faces a possible death sentence if convicted. Howard State's Attorney Timothy J. McCrone said yesterday that he is pursuing the death-penalty prosecution that was filed by his predecessor, Marna L. McLendon, late last year.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2003
A 44-year-old Columbia banker, who wrote in his journal that killing his two preschool-age daughters would be fitting punishment for a wife he hated, pleaded guilty yesterday to two counts of first-degree murder in a deal that spares his life, while ensuring that he spends the rest of it in prison. Robert Emmett Filippi trembled, rocked and sobbed during yesterday's 90-minute hearing, admitting his guilt in the June 9 strangulation deaths last year of Nicole Filippi, 4, and her 2-year-old sister, Lindsey.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2002
Robert Emmett Filippi, the Columbia banker accused in the killing of his two preschool-age daughters in June, was indicted on murder charges yesterday - just days after court officials received a psychiatric report that found him incompetent to stand trial. A Howard County grand jury returned the indictment, which charges two counts of first-degree murder, against Filippi, 44, in the strangling of 4-year-old Nicole Filippi and 2-year-old Lindsey. Each charge carries a maximum penalty of death.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2002
Neighbors have characterized the Columbia man accused of strangling his young daughters Sunday as "the picture of suburbia" - always outside gardening and playing with the children. "He seemed like a perfectly normal fellow," said John Jefferson, who lives near the family's Harmel Drive home. But behind closed doors, Robert Emmett Filippi could be controlling, unpredictable and even abusive, his former wife, Karen York, said in an interview this week with The Sun. Both his former wife and estranged wife have accused Filippi of physical assault and intimidation.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2002
Four-year-old Nicole Filippi and her 2-year-old sister Lindsey chased fireflies with their father and some friends until 9:30 Sunday night in the family's picturesque Columbia yard, neighbors said. Two hours later, Howard County police discovered the girls' bodies and arrested their father, Robert Emmett Filippi, 43, accusing him of strangling his daughters in an upstairs bedroom of his Harmel Drive home, police said yesterday. The two most serious charges, of first-degree murder, make him eligible for the death penalty.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2002
A Columbia banker accused in June of killing his two young daughters before trying to hang himself has been found competent to stand trial. The murder case against Robert Emmett Filippi had been in a legal limbo since state psychiatrists, who evaluated him after his arrest in the strangulation deaths of 4-year-old Nicole Filippi and her 2-year-old sister, Lindsey, determined that he was incompetent. But his status recently changed, Howard Circuit Judge Diane O. Leasure told lawyers yesterday during a brief hearing to discuss Filippi's pending divorce from the girls' mother, Naoko Nakajima.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2002
A preliminary hearing for a 44-year-old Columbia banker accused of killing his two preschool-age daughters last month was delayed yesterday to give mental health professionals more time to determine if he is competent to stand trial. During a brief appearance in Howard District Court yesterday, an attorney for Robert Emmett Filippi said that officials at Clifton T. Perkins Hospital were evaluating his client and would need more time to assess whether he will be able to assist in his defense.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 18, 2002
A 44-year-old Columbia banker accused of strangling his two preschool-age daughters in June is scheduled to go on trial, charged with murder, Dec. 9. Court officials set the date and a Dec. 4 motions date for Robert Emmett Filippi during a brief hearing in Howard Circuit Court yesterday. The hearing was held two weeks after state psychiatrists found Filippi competent to stand trial in the deaths of 4-year-old Nicole Filippi and her 2-year-old sister, Lindsey. A previous finding that he was not competent had stalled criminal proceedings in the case.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 11, 2003
Motions in a murder case against a Columbia banker accused in the stranglings of his two preschool-age daughters were delayed yesterday after lawyers said they were still waiting for the results of a psychiatric examination. Robert Emmett Filippi, 44, entered a plea in January of not criminally responsible, saying he was insane when he allegedly killed Nicole Filippi, 4, and her 2-year-old sister, Lindsey, in June. A court-ordered evaluation by a psychiatrist at the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center has not been completed, Filippi's lawyer, James B. Kraft, told Howard Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney during a hearing yesterday.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2003
A Columbia banker accused of fatally strangling his two preschool-age daughters is pleading insanity in the case. Robert Emmett Filippi, 44, filed notice this month that he is pleading not criminally responsible "by reason of insanity" in the June deaths of 4-year-old Nicole Filippi and her 2-year-old sister, Lindsey. Filippi, who has been charged with two counts of first-degree murder, faces a possible death sentence if convicted. Howard State's Attorney Timothy J. McCrone said yesterday that he is pursuing the death-penalty prosecution that was filed by his predecessor, Marna L. McLendon, late last year.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2003
A Columbia banker accused of strangling his two preschool-age daughters is pleading insanity in the case. Robert Emmett Filippi, 44, filed notice this month that he is pleading not criminally responsible "by reason of insanity" in the June deaths of 4-year-old Nicole Filippi and her 2-year-old sister, Lindsey. Filippi, who has been charged with two counts of first-degree murder, faces a possible death sentence if convicted. Howard State's Attorney Timothy J. McCrone said yesterday that he is pursuing the death-penalty prosecution that was filed by his predecessor, Marna L. McLendon, late last year.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 3, 2002
The murder trial of Columbia banker Robert Emmett Filippi, who is accused in the strangulation deaths of his two preschool-age daughters, has been postponed from next week to May 12. In court papers, Filippi's defense lawyer, James B. Kraft, said he requested the date change because of departing Howard State's Attorney Marna L. McLendon's decision to seek the death penalty against his client. A postponement will give lawyers on both sides time to address issues related to the case, Kraft wrote.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2002
Howard County State's Attorney Marna L. McLendon announced yesterday that she is seeking the death penalty against a Columbia banker accused of killing his two preschool-age daughters -- marking the first time in her nearly eight years in office that the prosecutor has opted to pursue the state's most severe punishment. But McLendon, who filed the required paperwork yesterday, would not explain her decision to seek death for Robert Emmett Filippi, saying that too much comment "could prejudice the whole case at this point."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 18, 2002
A 44-year-old Columbia banker accused of strangling his two preschool-age daughters in June is scheduled to go on trial, charged with murder, Dec. 9. Court officials set the date and a Dec. 4 motions date for Robert Emmett Filippi during a brief hearing in Howard Circuit Court yesterday. The hearing was held two weeks after state psychiatrists found Filippi competent to stand trial in the deaths of 4-year-old Nicole Filippi and her 2-year-old sister, Lindsey. A previous finding that he was not competent had stalled criminal proceedings in the case.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 3, 2002
The murder trial of Columbia banker Robert Emmett Filippi, who is accused in the strangulation deaths of his two preschool-age daughters, has been postponed from next week to May 12. In court papers, Filippi's defense lawyer, James B. Kraft, said he requested the date change because of departing Howard State's Attorney Marna L. McLendon's decision to seek the death penalty against his client. A postponement will give lawyers on both sides time to address issues related to the case, Kraft wrote.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Lisa Goldberg and Julie Bykowicz and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
As their marriage dissolved, Robert Emmett Filippi tried to lock Naoko Nakajima out of the couple's Columbia home, their marital assets and even their children's lives, her lawyer said. Now Nakajima and her lawyer want to prevent Filippi from using those marital assets to defend himself against charges that he strangled their two young daughters last week. "Clearly, assets accumulated during a marriage should not be used in the criminal defense of someone accused of killing the children from that marriage," Nakajima's attorney, William G. Salmond, said yesterday in an interview.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2002
A Columbia banker accused in June of killing his two young daughters before trying to hang himself has been found competent to stand trial. The murder case against Robert Emmett Filippi had been in a legal limbo since state psychiatrists, who evaluated him after his arrest in the strangulation deaths of 4-year-old Nicole Filippi and her 2-year-old sister, Lindsey, determined that he was incompetent. But his status recently changed, Howard Circuit Judge Diane O. Leasure told lawyers yesterday during a brief hearing to discuss Filippi's pending divorce from the girls' mother, Naoko Nakajima.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2002
Attorneys for a Columbia banker accused of killing his two preschool-age daughters and for his estranged wife agreed yesterday to freeze the couple's assets and to delay proceedings in their divorce case temporarily. The agreement between lawyers for Robert Emmett Filippi and Naoko Nakajima also calls for the sale of the couple's Harmel Drive house, which is valued at $325,700 and is mortgaged. The proceeds, which will be placed in an escrow account, and other "marital assets" will be frozen until the two sides can agree on how to divide them, the lawyers said.
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