Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFilipinos
IN THE NEWS

Filipinos

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 16, 1995
MANILA, Philippines -- The government of Singapore, which has tried to portray the debate over its draconian legal system as a clash between Asian and Western values, now finds its courts under attack by fellow Asians who are campaigning to prevent the execution of a Philippine woman this week.Leading Philippine politicians, human rights groups and church leaders are demanding that Singapore stay the execution of Flor Contemplacion, 42, a Philippine maid who is scheduled to be hanged tomorrow for the deaths of another maid and a 4-year-old Singaporean boy in 1991.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | July 15, 2014
An Irishman, a Jew and a Mexican walk into a bar. It's a classic set-up line for a classic American joke. But it's also a means of coping with our diversity. We need such jokes. Despite all our slogans to the contrary, diversity such as ours isn't always easy to negotiate. Humor is just one of the ways Americans navigate, narrate, expose and otherwise unburden ourselves of the absurdities and pitfalls of living in such a complicated place. Eight years ago, Harvard political scientist Robert Putnam released a now-famous study concluding that diversity lowers social trust.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Katrice Franklin and Katrice Franklin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 24, 2001
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va.- It looks like a bank. Keeps hours like a bank. Has plastic flowers and tellers like a bank. Even has bulletproof glass windows. But Fitz Dasal doesn't do his banking there. It's where he comes when he needs to send money home to the Philippines. Like many local Filipinos, Dasal uses a rapid remittance center- a Western Union-style office - which specializes exclusively in sending money to the Philippines. "How much are you sending?" Alice Malubag asked from behind the counter of the Philippine National Bank Rapid Remittance Center in Kempsville, Va. "My family needs $100," said Dasal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
Corner BYOB in Hampden is offering a $30 Filipino Fiesta Menu during its regular dinner hours on Dec. 3. The dinner is a benefit for the victims of Typhoon Haiyan, which devastated the Visayas region of the Philippines on Nov. 7. The menu will be designed by Sony Florendo, who owned the well-remembered Sony's Philippine-Asian restaurants in Baltimore back in the 1980s/'90s. The dinner is being coordinated by Corner BYOB co-owner Cecille Fenix, who has roots and family in the affected area.
NEWS
By Ching-Ching Ni and Ching-Ching Ni,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2003
MANILA, Philippines - They come to Quiapo Church to pray to the black Nazarene, a dark wooden statue of Jesus believed to have special powers. Desperate for a miracle, supplicants often roll up their clothing and crawl on bare knees from the back of the cathedral to the altar some 100 feet away. For some, there is a less painful path. For a few pesos, they can hire one of the church's dozen or so "prayer ladies" to smooth the bumps on the hard road to salvation. "God does not care who the prayer is coming from, as long as the person who paid for the prayer is sincere," says Nanette Rosales, 63, a widow who for more than two decades has been praying on behalf of others for a fee. Since colonial Spain brought Roman Catholicism to this sprawling Southeast Asian archipelago four centuries ago, Filipinos have customized their religion with local interpretations.
NEWS
March 26, 1995
Flor Contemplacion was a lowly drudge in life to whom no one outside her immediate family paid attention. In death she was hailed by no less than her nation's president as heroine and martyr. For this, the swift execution of Singapore's justice system is responsible.The Filipino maid worked in Singapore to support her four children back home, where her husband could find no work. She was one of the two million Filipinos working as domestic servants and laborers abroad whose $8 billion remittances support the Philippines economy.
NEWS
By John M. Glionna and John M. Glionna,Tribune Newspapers | September 20, 2009
SANTA BARBARA, Philippines - -Looking down the main drag of this farm town, Police Chief Eric Noble marvels at the modern conveniences - byproducts of the fierce ties binding Philippine families. Sturdy houses with concrete foundations now replace the thatched huts of a generation ago. There are new cars, washing machines, children attending private schools and former sharecroppers who have purchased the farms where they once worked as lowly laborers. Such economic progress has come from remittances, the staggering $1 billion sent to families nationwide each month by Filipinos working overseas in an attempt to overcome extreme poverty and joblessness in their native land.
NEWS
June 26, 1992
Gen. Fidel Ramos deserves the support of all Filipinos as their next president. Only 23.5 percent of those voting wanted him in the job, but he got the biggest plurality. Handing presidential power to such a slim winner over six opponents, without a run-off, leaves much to be desired, but the Philippines congress and courts made clear there is no alternative. His succession to Corazon Aquino on next Tuesday will be the first smooth transition in the country in 26 years and a tribute to her achievement in completing an elected term.
NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | July 15, 2014
An Irishman, a Jew and a Mexican walk into a bar. It's a classic set-up line for a classic American joke. But it's also a means of coping with our diversity. We need such jokes. Despite all our slogans to the contrary, diversity such as ours isn't always easy to negotiate. Humor is just one of the ways Americans navigate, narrate, expose and otherwise unburden ourselves of the absurdities and pitfalls of living in such a complicated place. Eight years ago, Harvard political scientist Robert Putnam released a now-famous study concluding that diversity lowers social trust.
TOPIC
By Sheila S. Coronel | December 10, 2000
FOURTEEN YEARS AGO, Filipinos ousted dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos in a festive, three-day uprising that restored democracy in the Philippines and presaged the end of authoritarian regimes elsewhere in Asia. Democracy was an exhilarating experience. Citizens spoke out freely, the media pulled out all stops in reporting the news, and newly formed political parties slugged it out in the electoral arena. But Filipinos soon realized that democracy did not necessarily bring about prosperity or good government.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
When Joshua Brown initially approached fellow student Jeanine Reyes last spring about starting a Filipino club at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, he figured the group might hold an occasional social pot-luck dinner. But then, on Nov. 8, Typhoon Haiyan tore through the Philippines, killing more than 5,200 people and wiping out an estimated $5.8 billion in infrastructure. About Some 1,600 people are still missing and 4 million have been displaced. The group, now called Bayanihan at Maryland, is raising money and awareness for those affected by the tragedy.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2013
Juan Magallon enlisted in the U.S. Navy while still in his home country, the Philippines, and served 20 years, taking part in such battles as Operation Desert Storm. Now a U.S. citizen, the Tucson, Ariz., resident said he frequently spoke to his son, Justin, about the gratitude he owed the nation and its armed forces. Apparently, Justin listened. He is among 1,200 plebes in the U.S. Naval Academy's Class of 2017 who since June have been immersed in their first year at Annapolis, away from friends and family.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
It's amazing that in a city, state and nation where families have been massively uprooted by the economic downturn, your paper puts the "plight" of Filipino children on the front page below the fold ("Limbo for children of Filipino teachers," May 8). Where was your concern when we had to uproot and separate our family by half a continent for the sake of employment? You ask what "legal explanation can justify the disruption of a [foreign] child's life," yet express little concern for the disruptions experienced by tax-paying citizens.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
As the school year draws to a close, one group of Baltimore students isn't making plans for summer. They deflect discussions about courseloads for next year, and shy away from questions about which colleges they hope to attend. They don't talk about "the future. " For hundreds of Filipino children who made the journey to Baltimore when the city school system sent recruiters across the world to recruit their parents for teaching positions in 2006, this year marks bitter ends and uncertain beginnings.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | April 11, 2012
  More than 100 international teachers in the Baltimore city school system will most likely lose their jobs and work visas, after a recent labor market test conducted by the district showed that there were hundreds of foreign instructors teaching in subjects that could be filled by qualified and certified American teachers. In a meeting with international teachers at Polytechnic Institute on Tuesday, city schools CEO Andres Alonso presented the results of the market test--basically an intensive advertising, interviewing and application review process--which found 213 American teachers who are eligible and interested in teaching in subjects currently taught by teachers.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
When Coast Guard inspectors boarded a new freighter docking in Baltimore last February, a junior-level engineer from the Philippines approached and slipped them a note. "I have sometheng to till you but secret," he wrote, using all capital letters. The secret — that the ship had illegally dumped oily waste and garbage into the ocean — resulted in the owners and operators of the M/V Aquarosa being fined $1.85 million in federal court Wednesday and also ordered to pay $550,000 to a foundation to help restore the Chesapeake Bay. And the whistle-blower, a seaman who supports a wife and four children on $27,000 a year, stands to earn a six-figure reward for his efforts, including gathering copies of the ship's logs and snapping hundreds of pictures of illegal onboard activities with his cell phone.
TOPIC
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 2003
THE UNITED STATES today finds itself mired down in a guerrilla war in Iraq a hundred years after it was mopping up its first major conflict on the far side of the vast oceanic moats that protected its mainland. In the summer of 1903, the struggle of the Philippines for independence from Americans, of all people, was virtually over. The insurgent leader, Emilio Aguinaldo, had been captured and was urging his followers to put down their arms. Senate hearings in the spring had exposed shameful atrocities on both sides.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2003
MANILA, Philippines - The Bush administration is all set to bring its "war on terrorism" to the Philippines. Hundreds of Green Berets, Navy SEALS and Marines are preparing to land on Jolo island and hunt down the Abu Sayyaf, a ruthless gang of kidnappers who style themselves Islamic militants. There's just one snag. The Philippine government, after apparently agreeing to let U.S. troops engage in combat, is balking now that the deal has become public. Yesterday, Philippine Defense Secretary Angelo Reyes flew to the United States, where he is to meet this week in Washington with Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and other officials.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
Baltimore city schools are featured in a documentary set to debut on PBS stations nationally Tuesday. But Maryland Public Television (MPT) does not have the film, which is based on a Baltimore Sun account of Filipino teachers recruited to Baltimore city classrooms, scheduled to air until Sept. 25 -- and then it is only airing on MPT Select (digital channel 22.2), not the main over-the-air channel 22. WETA, Washington's main PBS outlet, also won't be carrying the documentary until Sept 25, but it will be on its main channel, 26. However, WETA is showing it at 12 a.m., while MPT is airing it in prime time at 10:30.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.