Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFilibuster
IN THE NEWS

Filibuster

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
Sen. Barbara Mikulski formally threatened to filibuster a bill to overhaul the U.S. Postal Service because of concerns she has about the proposed closing of Easton's mail processing center, the Maryland Democrat's office said Thursday. The bipartisan bill would allow the Postal Service to end Saturday delivery and offer buyouts to employees. It would not affect the Easton plant directly, but because the U.S. Postal Service supports the measure, Mikulski is hoping to use it as leverage.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 25, 2013
The week between Christmas and New Year's is surely the nation's least productive, and that's why it ought to be dubbed "The 113 t h Congress Week. " Naturally, the members of the U.S. House and Senate who so richly deserve this distinction are observing the week by doing what they do best — taking a two-week break. How unproductive a year has it been for the 535 men and women who compose the 113 t h ? It's been historic, thank you. Not only have they passed fewer bills than any Congress in modern history (64)
Advertisement
NEWS
March 7, 2013
Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul got a lot of attention Wednesday for mounting an honest-to-God filibuster of President Barack Obama's nominee for CIA director, John Brennan. The nation's political class marveled at his real-life Mr. Smith act, the funny stuff his fellow senators said as they took their turns in support - Sen. Marco Rubio, for example, referenced Jay-Z, Wiz Khalifa and "The Godfather" - and the reason he stopped 11 hours short of Strom Thurmond's filibuster record (it seems the late South Carolina senator was, if not stronger in his convictions, at least stronger in his bladder)
NEWS
December 5, 2013
It is most disturbing that former Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and so many current members of the U.S. Senate and House do not understand that minority rule in either house of Congress was one of the fears expressed by the Framers of the Constitution ( "The nuclear option: then and now," Dec. 1). The "nuclear option" of eliminating the filibuster for certain appointments is not a reversal of the intent of the Framers - it is a return to their original intent. Indeed, the entire portion of Rule 22 of the Senate that requires any vote to be more than a majority of the quorum present is in violation of the higher ranking "supreme law of the land.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Sun Movie Critic | February 26, 2010
M r. Smith Goes to Washington" is more pertinent today then it was in 1939. It's also a more apt piece of programming for the AFI Silver this weekend than it would have been on Presidents Day. No political tool has become more tainted than the filibuster. Especially after Scott Brown's election to the Senate, even political novices have grown comfortable with technical words like "supermajority" (the votes needed to override a filibuster). The filibuster has become the element of choice to block appointees or legislation.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
The announcement last week that South Carolina's Jim DeMint is leaving his Senate seat to run the Heritage Foundation caused some in Washington to wishfully think that perhaps the move might usher in a more congenial, if not cooperative, outlook in the U.S. Senate. But while Mr. DeMint set the gold standard for ideological purity (denouncing his own party's candidates from time to time when they failed to measure up to his tea party, ultraconservative viewpoint), there are still plenty in the GOP with the flexibility of a ramrod.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | April 26, 1993
Washington -- The solid phalanx of Republican senators who filibustered President Clinton's $16.3 billion economic stimulus package into oblivion had a field day finding little specks of possible pork in the proposal and then declaring the whole exercise a boondoggle.The suggested one-time injection of $2.5 billion into the community development block grant (CDBG) program was the whipping boy of choice.The editorial staff of The Wall Street Journal combed through a 4,000-item ''ready-to-go'' public works list compiled by the U.S. Conference of Mayors,projects that might or might not have been selected for CDBG funding.
NEWS
By Ronald Weich | March 10, 2013
The filibuster is back in the news, thanks to Sen. Rand Paul's nearly 13-hour talkathon on U.S. drone policy last week. Putting aside the merits of Mr. Paul's national security views, his feat of endurance was in the best tradition of the Senate. He used his right to unlimited debate on the Senate floor to draw the attention of his fellow citizens to an issue of profound national importance. Other recent filibusters are less noble. Last month, senators used the rules to delay, for little apparent reason, confirmation of their former colleague Chuck Hagel to be secretary of defense.
NEWS
February 23, 2010
O ne of the most perplexing things about contemporary Washington is that Democrats simultaneously hold the largest majority any party has had in the Senate in decades and are utterly unable to move forward with important legislation. The key to this paradox is the Senate rule that allows for the filibuster - unlimited debate on a motion that can only be stopped by a vote of three-fifths of the chamber, or 60 senators. So the reason nothing much is getting done in Washington is that filibusters are going on all the time, right?
NEWS
January 24, 2013
The best chance to get the U.S. Senate to do its job is not to withhold pay (although withholding campaign contributions might have done the trick) but to reform the Senate rules so that filibusters aren't used so routinely to gum up the works. Majority Leader Harry Reid promised to take action, but the reforms revealed Thursday fall short of the strong medicine the chamber, and the nation, so desperately need. Potentially the most far-reaching change Senator Reid, a Democrat, and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican, have agreed to support is a rule change that would make it much more difficult to filibuster a bill prior to its coming to the floor.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | December 1, 2013
Ehrlich: "It's time for all of us oppressed minorities to rise up!" I'm usually not one to degrade my former profession. I still believe public service to be a noble career path. But this week I'm going to make an exception. Last month's events in the U.S. Senate provide the context. The issue concerns the Senate filibuster, that ultimate legislative tool of the minority party. The heretofore sacrosanct parliamentary maneuver had been much discussed in the recent past, particularly the notion that a "nuclear option" (degrading the filibuster)
NEWS
November 30, 2013
In the second paragraph of the Declaration of Independence it specifically states that "all men are created equal. " My fellow Democrats in the U.S. Senate did the unthinkable when they changed the filibuster (cloture) rules. They erected the ultimate fence in favor of Democrats and against the rest of the citizens of the United States. The Democrats now have opened our judicial system to suspicion. Will the letter of the laws of our land apply equally if you are a Republican or independent?
NEWS
November 21, 2013
While there may be some bruised feelings and anger left behind in the aftermath, the so-called "nuclear option" unleashed Thursday by Senate Major Leader Harry Reid and the Democrats hardly seems worthy of its destructive billing. It means only that from now on in judicial nominations other than those for the Supreme Court, the majority will no longer have to muster 60 votes to win confirmation. That Senate Republicans immediately compared the change in Senate rules to Obamacare - a non sequitur if ever there was one - was only symptomatic of the political polarization that required such a change in the first place.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
Faced with another crisis over one of its least democratic traditions, the U.S. Senate appears to have blown off enough steam to avoid a messy and divisive showdown over the use of the filibuster. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and a handful of Republicans, notably Sen. John McCain, tentatively agreed to a deal that will allow several of President Barack Obama's executive branch nominees to receive confirmation votes - a rare but encouraging example of the two parties working together.
NEWS
July 15, 2013
There's a stricture in our structure. Our government isn't functioning the way it's supposed to, for the benefit of its citizens, for two reasons: a small number of extreme obstructionists; and a large number of feckless Senators reluctant to correct the filibuster system ("Dems threaten filibuster limits," July 12). The rules for the Senate filibuster are at the heart of the problem. If used responsibly, and traditionally, a real filibuster (where senators stand and argue their case without time limits)
NEWS
July 15, 2013
Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid says he's thoroughly fed up with Republicans' abuse of the filibuster rule to block President Obama's executive branch appointees. This week he may finally get a chance to do something about it. In saying that he may invoke what is known as the "nuclear option," Mr. Reid has signaled his readiness to impose a small but significant change in the Senate rules that would reduce the number of votes needed to break a filibuster in certain circumstances - from a supermajority of 60 votes to a simple majority of 51. Mr. Reid is not proposing to eliminate the filibuster altogether, merely to prevent the minority party from derailing Senate confirmation of the president's nominees for executive agency posts.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 4, 2011
With the opening Wednesday of a new session of Congress, the Senate has a rare opportunity under its rules to bring sanity to its time-honored right to unfettered speech. For its first legislative day only, it can, by simple majority vote, require members to put their bodies where their mouths are if they choose to filibuster against a measure they oppose. Democratic Sen. Tom Udall of New Mexico has said he intends, on the new Senate's first legislative day, to offer a rule whereby senators will no longer be able to stymie action by mere threat of a filibuster but will be required to actually hold the floor with an old-fashioned talkathon.
NEWS
May 22, 2013
I have one very simple question for the ultra partisan, liberal Sun. Will you and the disingenuous Democrats still be demanding filibuster reform if the Republicans take control of the House and Senate in 2014 ("Tom Perez and the 'nuclear option,'" May 20). I doubt it, but I'm just askin'. Gail Householder, Marriottsville
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.