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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | August 12, 1992
Every so often an occasion arises that requires some extra indulgences and luxury. A meal that executes this theme does not have to be time consuming. Some of the highest quality ingredients require little adornment and can simply stand on their own.Roquefort, a very noble and creamy, blue-veined cheese, aged only in the caves of Roquefort, France, adds the most elite of flavors to a luscious filet mignon. Because of its extremely creamy texture, it is the best of all blue-veined cheeses for this treatment.
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By L'Oreal Thompson | May 16, 2011
Quality. Consistency. And an excellent staff. These are the three ingredients Josef Gohring, owner of Josef’s Country Inn in Fallston, believes are necessary to create a successful restaurant and he should know—his establishment was recently voted “Best Classic Restaurant” in Harford County. Born in Germany, Josef has been in the restaurant business since he was 15 years old. “People always come back to basics,” he says. “You have to have a great staff, quality in food and consistency.
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BUSINESS
By Alyssa Gabbay and Alyssa Gabbay,Special to The Sun | October 13, 1991
Forget the adage that there's no free lunch. In local real estate circles, the free meal has arrived -- as well as the free fireplace, the free car and the free trip to Hawaii.Pressed by sagging profits, local builders and developers are relying on incentives to lure buyers. Usually, these deal-sweeteners offer abnormally low interest rates, or payment of closing costs.But creative developers are dreaming up unique methods of attracting purchasers, methods that can range from the sublime to . . . well, the meaty.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2010
This newly opened Phoenix restaurant is a double comeback. First, it's the return of a landmark dining destination. It's also the return of a chef. For decades, Peerce's Plantation was a landmark, family-owned Baltimore County dining destination before it closed in 2001. A short revival under new owners didn't take, and Peerce's faded into memory, along with dozens of other bygone favorites. Then, a stirring. In 2008, Joe Bivona purchased the property as a venue for his Signature Catering company.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | February 13, 2008
In O. Henry's stories of striving in turn-of-the-century New York, known collectively as The Four Million, filet mignon has a recurring role as a symbol of love and momentary luxury. The diminutive tail end of the tenderloin is the rare celebration meal for two starving artists, each secretly working in a laundry so the other can pursue a dream. In another story, a young lady who subsists mostly on weak Irish stew sheds a tear over her filet as she dines alone, fearing the well-to-do suitor who bought it is about to be proved disreputable.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1998
Lewnes' Steakhouse is the sort of restaurant that can stir up extreme emotions.There's the intense yearning as you wait for your food while the smells of delicious dishes at other tables swirl mercilessly around you, joy as you bite into chunks of tender filet mignon and then abysmal sadness when the meal is over and you're too stuffed to order that second strawberry shortcake.My sister and I arrived at Lewnes' late on a chilly weeknight to a short wait for a nonsmoking table. We passed time at the restaurant's small bar, where a slightly inebriated man nursing a drink proclaimed himself a regular and animatedly emoted about Lewnes' wonderful steaks, crab balls, crab cakes everything.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1998
J. T. Ashley's Grille is not a bad place to grab a meal -- if you don't mind average food and slow service.We found the restaurant almost empty early on a recent Saturday evening and were seated immediately. The decor was a clash between the Miami-style pastel walls -- salmon-pink -- and the grill-house feel of the green marble columns and faux oak tables.The piped-in pop medley featuring The Supremes and Top 40 music created a weird feel and was a little loud.But overall, we got a lot of feeling -- thanks in part to the dim lighting -- and the restaurant was warm and comfortable.
NEWS
April 19, 1995
An Arnold man was arrested Monday evening and charged with trying to sneak out of a grocery store with a package of filet mignon hidden in his pants, county police said.A security officer at the Basics food store in the 5600 block of Ritchie Highway told police that a man came into the store about 6:45 p.m. and went to the meat section, where he stuffed a $9.20 package of filet mignon in his pants. The officer stopped the man when he tried to leave without paying, police said.John Arthur Watson, 30, of the 700 block David Drive was charged with misdemeanor theft, police said.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,tribune media services | December 14, 2003
Eating a radish requires a leap of faith. With its sharp, biting reputation, it doesn't invite timid appetites. Yet a radish's plump shape and vivid color are so tempting, it's hard to resist. Fortunately this root vegetable's charms outweigh its pungent nature. And radishes offer so much variety that if one type is too potent, you can find another that is more to your liking. Cherry Belle is probably the radish you're most familiar with. The bright red globes, ranging in size from a nickel to a silver dollar, deliver snap and crunch in the white-fleshed interior.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1999
Fred's Tiffany Room Restaurant in Parole is a cozy neighborhood restaurant that offers a good selection of fairly priced seafood and more kitschy ambience than you probably want for a quiet, romantic dinner.But if you decide to go to Fred's, avoid the steak. My 1/3-inch-thick, way-too-tough "filet mignon" deterred my boyfriend and me from going back unless we have no other dining options.After seeing an ad in the phone book touting the "Best Crab Cake in Annapolis," my partner and I trekked to Fred's one recent rainy weeknight.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | September 30, 2009
These days it's cause to celebrate when a restaurant more ambitious than a pub or pizza place opens in Baltimore. Scary times usually produce eateries that offer sure bets in the way of food - sure bets that don't cost much. When I first heard about the Reserve (1542 Light St., TheReserveBaltimore.com), a new Federal Hill bar, I figured when it got around to serving food, the kitchen would produce the usual nachos, wings and burgers. Instead, the offerings include tuna tataki, shrimp and tropical fruit ceviche, cornmeal-crusted red grouper in a smoked salmon caper beurre blanc, Buffalo strip steak with parsnip puree and pan-roasted boneless quail.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | February 18, 2009
Last week I did a Top 10 list of romantic restaurants for the budget-minded on my blog, Dining@Large. Because I believe you'll have a better time with your sweetie celebrating at a restaurant before or after Valentine's Day when places aren't as crowded, I'm reprinting it here. Note that the list is in alphabetical order. (We also discussed where to go for the what-the-heck-she's-worth-it dinner, when money isn't a consideration.) 1 Annabel Lee Tavern in Canton. Dark and romantically mysterious setting.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | February 13, 2008
In O. Henry's stories of striving in turn-of-the-century New York, known collectively as The Four Million, filet mignon has a recurring role as a symbol of love and momentary luxury. The diminutive tail end of the tenderloin is the rare celebration meal for two starving artists, each secretly working in a laundry so the other can pursue a dream. In another story, a young lady who subsists mostly on weak Irish stew sheds a tear over her filet as she dines alone, fearing the well-to-do suitor who bought it is about to be proved disreputable.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | March 7, 2007
A waterside Fells Point eatery has brought a little more of the sea inside. Last weekend, Shucker's Restaurant and Bar opened its new raw bar. Tony Lombardi - who owns Shucker's with Andy Rosenthal - says the room used to be one of two main dining rooms. Now, the room is more of a bar/lounge area. When you walk in the restaurant's front door off the Broadway Pier, you can go left of the big 400-gallon fish tank into the main dining room, the main bar or a back bar/lounge. Or you can turn right, where you'll find a long Corian-topped bar, divided in the middle by the large iced fresh seafood display set behind a wall of glass.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | November 15, 2006
City dwellers on the go have some new choices for dinner. Federal Hill's Dinner at Your Door not only has a new address -- with more room and a drive-up service -- it's also offering some new meal options. For the last three years, Dinner at Your Door offered healthful catering and delivered dinners to nearby neighborhoods. However, owner Brooke Hagerty says that when the shop lost its storefront lease at 1106 S. Charles St., she not only found a new place, but the larger space has enabled her to expand the business.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | October 4, 2006
There are custom-made homes, custom-made clothes, and now custom-made steak, courtesy of Howard County's newest restaurant, oZ. Chophouse. That's pronounced Oh-Zee, as in the abbreviation of ounce. Not Oz, as in "The Wizard of." The name, and the concept, come from owners Tim and Katie Buscher. "We were going to call it Ounce Chophouse because we can customize our steaks and serve them by the ounce, but it didn't sound right," Katie Buscher says. Little "o", big "Z," period was born. Although, from the sounds of it, this eatery may have more than just the slight similarity in nomenclature to the land of Dorothy.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | December 18, 2005
WHEN IT COMES TO THE HOLLY BALL, decking the halls is only the beginning. The fundraiser for the Hospice of Baltimore and Gilchrest Center for Hospice Care is known for its "only the best" atmosphere. "Pat Modell [the honorary co-chair with husband Art] makes sure this is over the top. The best band. The best food. Mink coats for the auction, for crying out loud!" exclaimed IBM vice president P.J. Mitchell. Unfortunately, Pat was feeling under the weather. So, son David Modell and wife Michel stood in for his parents, greeting guests alongside gala chairs Connie and Bill Pitcher.
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,Staff Writer Germano's Trattoria Petrucci Staff Writer Greenspring Inn | March 21, 1992
Pier 500, HarborView Marina and Yacht ClubPier 500, HarborView Marina and Yacht Club, Key Highway, (410) 625-0500. , Key Highway, (410) 625-0500. Pier 500 is definitely new Baltimore, but it's a restaurant that all Baltimore can be proud of. Operated by chef Connie Crabtree, this contemporary restaurant is nestled in a new waterfront development on Key Highway beyond the Inner Harbor. The atmosphere is casual; the dining room attractive; and the menu varied. There is a nice mix of light fare and full meals -- several salads that would each seem to make a meal and an entree list that includes grilled mixed vegetables ($9.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 2006
Darren Petty, who owns the Natty Boh Lounge and Canton Station with Charley Alfred, said he's been a National Bohemian fan since he was a young man. Short on cash, he chose the famed Baltimore-brewed beer not because of its taste, though it's not bad at all, but because it was cheap - "$3.50 a case warm, four bucks cold." Natty Boh is no longer brewed in Baltimore, but the love affair between the city and the the beer continues, thanks in part to Petty and Alfred. The mustachioed, circle-headed Natty Boh logo now winks from the walls of the Natty Boh Lounge, which opened in November on the second and third floors above Canton Station.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | December 21, 2005
A popular Remington eating institution has taken a second home downtown. You'll now find Dizzy Issie's North Charles on ... well, North Charles. More precisely, in Mount Vernon, above the Grand Central pub at Charles and Eager streets. "At my other place, we get a lot of people from downtown, and sometimes they would have to wait 40, 45 minutes for a table," says Dizzy Issie's owner Elaine Stevens. When her good friend Don Davis, the owner of Grand Central, invited her to set up shop on the second floor, Stevens says she jumped at the chance.
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