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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 15, 2003
Joan Astley Ogilvie, a retired figure skating instructor, died Monday at St. Joseph Medical Center after falling in her Rodgers Forge home. She was 82. Joan A. Thompson was born in Ceylon, now Sri Lanka, where her father was a British investment banker. She attended private schools in Ceylon, India and England. She was trained as a figure skater at the Queens Ice Club in London. While at the school, she met her husband, Robert S. Ogilvie, also a figure skater. During World War II, she was an operating room nurse at St. Mary's Hospital in London, and she drove an ambulance during the Blitz.
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NEWS
By Carolyn Kelemen | March 31, 2014
Interest in ice skating peaks every four years during the Olympics. The 2014 Sochi games might be over, but swirling figures on ice are still dancing in the dreams of young would-be Meryl Davis and Charlie White, the Olympic gold medalists in ice dancing. Since 1975, the Columbia Figure Skating Club has provided area skaters with the opportunity to pursue both recreational and competitive skating. Each spring, Pat Muth, her daughter Martha, granddaughter Melissa, and a host of volunteers put many of these rising ice stars in a standing-room-only spectacle, this time around appropriately called "Frozen In Time," at the Columbia Ice Rink.
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FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2000
Sometimes, you simply know when it's time to call it quits. For figure skater Scott Hamilton that time is now, or soon anyway. Hamilton, an Olympic champion who has dazzled audiences for more than two decades, is not hanging up his skates entirely. But he is saying farewell to his "Target Stars on Ice" show, which has been touring the country for the past 15 years. The 2000-01 season will be his last with the show. "It seems like 15 years was enough," Hamilton says over the phone from Los Angeles.
SPORTS
By Mike King, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Robert Ogilvie spent thousands of hours in front of his television screen, watching videotapes of his figure skating students alongside those of national, international and Olympic competitors. The British-born World War II veteran, former prisoner of war and internationally renowned figure skater had settled down in Baltimore in 1960, beginning a lifelong devotion to teaching his craft. He died Nov. 18 at 97, and a memorial service will be held for him at the Cathedral of the Incarnation at 4 East University Parkway on Friday at 5 p.m. "In his teaching relationships with his students, I really think that he wanted every student to kind of actualize all their potential in skating," said Robin Williams, a student of Ogilvie's from age 7 through 18, then a colleague and friend for 50 years.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | January 7, 1992
Forgive the confusion of the new employees at R&M Trucking in New Egypt, N.J., when the boss sometimes shows up on television dressed in tight polyester pants and sequin-studded shirts, or bolts the office for a ballet class in the middle of the afternoon, or comes to work after appearing in a fashion show at Longwood Gardens.By night, Rocky Marval might be out on the interstates, looking like just another 26-year-old Teamster in jeans and a sweat shirt, balancing his work boots on the gears of a dump truck, pouring out gravel as if it were gold.
NEWS
By Jenny Huddleston and Jenny Huddleston,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 6, 1998
Olympians-in-training have a lot on their minds, from the pressures of competition to the glare of international attention. Second-graders at Scotts Branch Elementary near Randallstown want to make sure the athletes don't forget the little things that keep them strong."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 5, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- Call him America's Olympic Flaim.Eric Flaim, a feisty, 30-year-old speed skater, will be the flag bearer for the U.S. team at the opening ceremonies of the Nagano Games.Seventy-two countries will make up the largest opening parade in Winter Games history, when the ceremonies are unfurled in a spectacle that will be televised live to the United States tomorrow night.Flaim's Olympic career is a testament to his endurance -- and ingenuity. He has won two silver medals in two different speed skating disciplines over three Games.
SPORTS
February 19, 1992
Paul and Isabelle Duchesnay, who settled for the silver in Monday night's ice dancing competition, said that after the sport's officials told them to tone things down, it would have been suicide not to acquiesce."
SPORTS
By MELISSA HARRIS AND LAURA MCCANDLISH and MELISSA HARRIS AND LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTERS | February 23, 2006
Sports psychologist Daniel Gould's first client was a tiny, 12-year-old figure skater whose parents were paying thousands of dollars a year for training. But nerves would make the girl physically ill during big performances. "She felt she had to perform well to justify the expense," Gould, director of the Institute for the Study of Youth Sports at Michigan State, said of the skater, who later became a coach. "You're all alone out there, and you have four minutes to get it done." For elite athletes like Bel Air's Kimmie Meissner and fellow Olympic figure skater Sasha Cohen, the pressure peaks today.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
Turin, Italy -- In the course of one evening, Apolo Ohno did what skier Bode Miller, bobsled driver Todd Hays and the U.S. women's hockey team could not do: win. By taking the gold medal in the 500-meter short-track speed skating event and adding a bronze in the 5,000-meter relay, Ohno helped the U.S. Olympic team end the 20th Winter Games on a high note. "I can't explain," Ohno said after the sprint. "I've been searching my entire career for the perfect race and that was it." Yesterday's haul coupled with an earlier bronze, and with gold and silver medals from the 2002 Winter Games, allowed Ohno to match 1980 hero Eric Heiden's medals total.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
Big brain. Small feet. It's a combination that has propelled Scott Dyer, a student-athlete in the truest sense of the term, to the Dean's List in his first semester at the University of Southern California and to center ice Friday in his debut in the senior men's division of the U.S. Figure Skating Championships. He will also skate on Sunday, the final day of the event, which is being held in Greensboro, N.C. this year. Dyer is hoping for a top-10 finish in a field of 22 men that includes two-time defending U.S. champion Jeremy Abbott, 2009 runner up Brandon Mroz and 2007 runner up Ryan Bradley.
SPORTS
By Philip Hersh and Tribune Newspapers | February 19, 2010
Evan Lysacek's coach, Frank Carroll, had one major hope for his skater going into Thursday's Olympic free skate final. "I want him to grab this opportunity and make it something special," Carroll said, "because so few skaters have this chance." Lysacek did all that and more at the Pacific Coliseum. Shaking off the suffocating pressure of the moment -- which actually lasted four minutes, 30 seconds -- Lysacek delivered a brilliant, career-best performance to become the first U.S. man to win the Olympic skating gold medal since Brian Boitano in 1988.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | June 21, 2009
The newest member of Kimmie Meissner's coaching team is a free spirit who cheerfully concedes that he knows nothing of figure skating, travels the country in a clunker Jeep with a bungee-corded tarp for a roof and 260,000 on the odometer, and keeps his clothes in a waterproof plastic box. Meet Gyula Pandi, at age 64, one part cheerleader, one part nag, one part choreographer. With the Winter Olympics eight months away, the former performer and teacher with the Hungarian Ballet Company is on board to help Meissner prepare for competition in the areas where judges have often downgraded her. "Tilt your head.
NEWS
March 1, 2009
The Columbia Figure Skating Club will present "Enchanted on Ice and Other Box Office Hits" - featuring excerpts from Twilight, A Chorus Line, Chicago, Madagascar, Camp Rock and Mamma Mia! - at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. March 28 and 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. March 29. Performances are at the Columbia Ice Rink, 5876 Thunder Hill Road. The community performance for families features more than 100 performers ages 4 to adult and includes many high-level skaters. Tickets are $10; children to age 3 get in free.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | December 31, 2007
Pat Muth's student had already fallen attempting an axel - the most maddening jump for a young figure skater - nine times in the first few minutes of her recent lesson at the Columbia Ice Rink in Howard County. "Ooooh. Ouch," Muth, 67, said as 9-year-old Ana Shimeall took the 10th and, by far, hardest blow of the afternoon. Muth skated out to her. "Do you have butt pads?" she asked. Ana sheepishly shook her head no. "You need to ask Santa Claus to bring you butt pads." Ana began to set her feet and arms for another attempt as Muth glided back to the side of the rink and said with pride, "She's willing to fall."
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN REPORTER | November 14, 2007
As matchups go, this could be the season's grandest of Grand Prix series events, a figure skating competition with crystal ball potential for this year and beyond. Kimmie Meissner vs. Mao Asada. A dozen women each will have just seven minutes to wow the judges with their athleticism and artistry at Trophee Eric Bompard in Paris, which begins tomorrow. For Meissner and Asada, the expectations go far beyond the $18,000 first-prize check and a spot in the Grand Prix Final next month in Turin, Italy.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | March 28, 2006
The title "world champion" implies that one can't do a whole lot better. In the high-stakes arena of sporting fame and product endorsement, however, Olympic gold is the ultimate prize for a figure skater. Thus, Bel Air's Kimmie Meissner has work to do if she wants to become the next Dorothy Hamill, according to marketing experts. But Meissner's win Saturday in Calgary, Alberta, primed the 16-year-old to be queen of the next Olympics, they said. "Being a world champion at her age is going to open up a lot of opportunities for her," said Robert Tuchman, president of TSE Sports and Entertainment, a New York company that matches companies with celebrity endorsers.
SPORTS
By Mike King, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Robert Ogilvie spent thousands of hours in front of his television screen, watching videotapes of his figure skating students alongside those of national, international and Olympic competitors. The British-born World War II veteran, former prisoner of war and internationally renowned figure skater had settled down in Baltimore in 1960, beginning a lifelong devotion to teaching his craft. He died Nov. 18 at 97, and a memorial service will be held for him at the Cathedral of the Incarnation at 4 East University Parkway on Friday at 5 p.m. "In his teaching relationships with his students, I really think that he wanted every student to kind of actualize all their potential in skating," said Robin Williams, a student of Ogilvie's from age 7 through 18, then a colleague and friend for 50 years.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | January 24, 2007
SPOKANE, Wash. -- With bronze and silver medals already at home in Maryland, Kimmie Meissner will try to complete the set this week at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships. Her timing couldn't be better. Michelle Kwan, the nine-time winner, and Sasha Cohen, last year's gold medalist, haven't put blades to ice competitively this season. The personal best score of Meissner's closest U.S. rival is 20 points lower. And the skater from Bel Air loves the nationals as much as they seem to love her. U.S. Figure Skating Championships Through Saturday, Spokane, Wash.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | March 28, 2006
The title "world champion" implies that one can't do a whole lot better. In the high-stakes arena of sporting fame and product endorsement, however, Olympic gold is the ultimate prize for a figure skater. Thus, Bel Air's Kimmie Meissner has work to do if she wants to become the next Dorothy Hamill, according to marketing experts. But Meissner's win Saturday in Calgary, Alberta, primed the 16-year-old to be queen of the next Olympics, they said. "Being a world champion at her age is going to open up a lot of opportunities for her," said Robert Tuchman, president of TSE Sports and Entertainment, a New York company that matches companies with celebrity endorsers.
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