Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFigs
IN THE NEWS

Figs

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | March 31, 2004
This time of year it can be hard to eat the five daily servings of fruit and vegetables nutritionists recommend. Dried figs are one easy way to give your body what it needs. Just 1 1/2 dried figs equal one serving of fruit. They also provide an excellent source of fiber and even a good amount of calcium. Here's an easy appetizer from the California Department of Food and Agriculture: Remove stems from 12 dried California figs and cut figs in half lengthwise. Place cut side down in a flat pan. In a small bowl, combine 1/4 cup soy sauce, 1/4 cup cider, 1 teaspoon sugar, 1 sliced clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon thinly sliced gingerroot.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013
From: Central Coast, Calif. Price: $15 Serve with: Grilled seafood This is a substantial, well-crafted dry white wine that offers a lot of complexity. This full-bodied sauvignon blanc displays flavors of figs, mint, lime, pears and herbs. With its intensity and long finish, it certainly punches above its weight class. -- Michael Dresser
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | August 31, 1997
AFTER SITTING around most of the summer doing next to nothing, my backyard fig trees suddenly began producing a glut of fruit. This rush to ripeness resulted in a race between me and the critters -- birds, bees and ants -- to see who could eat the figs first.Fresh figs are a prize worth pursuing. They have a unique texture, and a flavor that is sweet but not cloying. So I put on a pair of gloves -- protection against surprised critters -- and went out and pinched the figs. The pinching helps determine how ripe the figs are.I had read that Italians, who seem to know a lot about figs, don't harvest them until they see juice dripping out of the blossom end of the fruit.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
My young fig tree is on the north side of a fence. Last fall we had one fruit which did not ripen, and that branch died over the winter. This year fruit appeared in late fall but didn't ripen before frost. How do I winterize my fig tree so I get figs? Fig trees are marginally hardy in Maryland. Once frost hits, fruit is no good. The problem is that you can't pick figs underripe either, so occasionally the crop is lost. The more protected and warm the fig's location, the better your chance for successful ripening before frost.
NEWS
By Melissa Kaman and Melissa Kaman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 26, 2002
Standing in a grove of fig trees is like being surrounded by wizards. Their branches droop like beards, resilient from years of travel and adaptation. They're round, ancient and wise, but best of all, they make magic. Just twice a year, they quietly transform their violet-hued branches with wide, majestic leaves into long arms laden with plump, succulent fruit. By biting into one, you can sink your teeth into the past. The fig's roots are woven into early history. They were first harvested between 4000 and 2700 B.C., when they began their trek from Egypt and Arabia to Greece, Italy, Mexico, Virginia and - in the 16th century - to California.
FEATURES
October 5, 1997
My 3-year-old fig tree is finally producing ripe figs. I'm a little upset, however, by the ants that crawl into the opening that appears on the bottom of the ripe fruits.Is there anything I can do about this?The small opening, referred to as the "eye," is common on most fig varieties. Ants find the sweet interior irresistible. But they do crawl out when you disturb them, and they don't usually affect the eating quality of the figs.You may be leaving your figs on the tree too long. Try to harvesting them as soon as they are fully colored and begin to droop a bit.By the way, Celeste is one of the fig varieties that is well adapted to our area.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | August 23, 1998
THE FIGS ARE falling! The figs are falling! Every time I venture into the vicinity of the parking pad in our back yard I have a good chance of getting hit by a descending fig.The two fig trees that reside there are having a banner year. This means that ripe figs, purple pieces of fruit about the size of golf balls, are dropping like hail.Fresh figs are a culinary treasure. They have a delightful, fruity and slightly sweet flavor. But they can also be a nuisance.I am reaching the point of being fed up with figs.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | May 23, 2007
Pork has such an affinity for fruit that I almost always reach for apples with one hand when the other picks up pork chops. Apples, pears, apricots, peaches, cherries: All are fare friends to pork's mild flavor. Lately, however, I've conceived a passion for figs. Of course, because they're not in season, I've contented myself with their dried incarnations. As passion will do, my new fig-love inspired me to combine them into a savory, nut-crunchy stuffing for the otherwise insipid boneless loin chop.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | August 25, 1999
IT IS RAINING figs in my back yard. It happens every August. The two fig trees planted in a strip of sorry soil next to our backyard parking pad start producing purple figs at a furious pace.Because some of the branches hang over our parked cars, part of my morning ritual becomes removing fallen figs from car windshields, hoods and rooftops. This summer, with the drought and state prohibition on washing cars at home, speedy removal of the figs has become especially important.Lifting a freshly fallen fig from a hood is a simple matter.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 28, 1996
THE FIG TREES and I have been battling for months. Their branches have been working me over whenever I park the car on the parking pad behind our house, within reach of the trees.Last winter one of the trees, covered in a protective blanket of burlap and weighed down by a record snowfall, leaned over and snapped a car antenna. Since May, when the leaves bloomed, the rough undersides of the leaves have been slapping me in the face as I squeeze past them.Now, however, I am beginning to reap the rewards of staying in this difficult relationship.
EXPLORE
October 4, 2011
I am deeply concerned about the process being used to alter the county school board. Our county executive says he does not like the way the school board is acting and wants to change the way the school board is constituted. To validate his viewpoint, he appointed a commission dominated by people with the same viewpoint as his. Then, when they recommend exactly what he wanted in the first place, he claims it to be an "independent" recommendation. If there is such a thing as "money laundering," this is certainly its equivalent: "politics laundering.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | January 20, 2010
This full-bodied, well-rounded sauvignon blanc stands out in an otherwise undistinguished line of California wines produced under the name of the legendary Australian golfer. This white wine displays floral aromas and vibrant flavors of figs, orange, lime, apricots, Asian spices and minerals. It lingers on the palate in a most satisfying way. 2008 Greg Norman California Estate Sauvignon Blanc From: North Coast, Calif. Price: $15 Serve with: Salmon, ham, Asian cuisine
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 26, 2009
Few endeavors in life are as rewarding and frustrating as having a fig tree in your yard. On the plus side, it produces loads of ripe fruit. On the minus side, it produces loads of ripe fruit. The fruit attracts birds. They peck the fruit, knocking juicy bits off the tree and onto cars parked below. A fallen fig leaves a tenacious stain, one that even a high-pressure hose has trouble dislodging. Combine these fig stains with the droppings deposited by feasting birds, and for a few weeks in the summer cars residing under the trees look as though they have been trashed by paint-ball-wielding vandals.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | October 24, 2007
Antoinette Cerrito of Greensboro, N.C., was looking for a recipe for making fig preserves. Janet Morrissey of Baltimore shared an easy recipe from her grandmother's recipe box. She says that it is a small yield because figs can be expensive, but the recipe easily can be doubled if you are lucky enough to have access to a fig tree. Fall is the fig season, so it's the ideal time to make these preserves. I found two varieties of fresh figs in my local grocery store. Morrissey says she usually puts her finished preserves in 4-ounce jelly jars and includes a jar in her Christmas gift baskets.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to the Sun | August 25, 2007
It looks like someone spun cotton around the stems of my flowers and shrubs. Not to be confused with mildew. (Or is it?) Do you know what to do about it? The nymphs of plant hoppers cover themselves with that white, actually waxy, fluffy material to protect themselves. When they leave plants, the harmless fluff often stays behind until weather wears it away. With our lack of rain, it may be more evident than usual. You may even see a few nymphs hiding in the fluff, but no control is recommended.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | May 23, 2007
Pork has such an affinity for fruit that I almost always reach for apples with one hand when the other picks up pork chops. Apples, pears, apricots, peaches, cherries: All are fare friends to pork's mild flavor. Lately, however, I've conceived a passion for figs. Of course, because they're not in season, I've contented myself with their dried incarnations. As passion will do, my new fig-love inspired me to combine them into a savory, nut-crunchy stuffing for the otherwise insipid boneless loin chop.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 11, 1999
A student in one of my cooking classes telephoned me a few days ago to report that she had taken a salad I prepared in one of my courses to share with friends at her office. Everyone had loved the Chicken, Fig and Green Bean Salad in Blue Cheese Dressing, and she wanted to know if she could give out the recipe. Nothing pleases cooking teachers more than to hear that people are enjoying their dishes, so I answered with an enthusiastic "yes."This salad is one I created at the beginning of the summer, and it has quickly become a personal favorite.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | February 23, 2000
When is a salad not a salad? Actually never, if you enter the brave new world of chefs who are taking a mundane concept (iceberg lettuce on a plate with orange goop on top) to strato- spheric heights. They're doing it with mangoes. With shrimp. Habanero peppers. Figs. Shaved fennel. Nectarines. Chocolate. Chocolate? That would be Thomas Keller's "Salad" Ile Flottante: slow-baked meringues stuffed with chocolate mousse in a pool of creme anglaise, topped with bittersweet chocolate "frisee" on top, drizzled with mint oil and sea salt.
NEWS
By MARCIA MYERS and MARCIA MYERS,SUN REPORTER | February 14, 2007
One snowy afternoon years ago, a friend showed up at our door with two perfect venison fillets, part of his take from a weekend hunting trip. Inspired by the crackling of the fireplace inside, my husband and I took the rack off the summer grill, set it over the burning wood and had a memorable dinner of the grilled steaks with port sauce. Americans are well-educated in the art of warm-weather grilling, but somehow little of it gets translated indoors to the fireplace. We seem satisfied to relegate hearth cooking to the Colonial era. But a fireplace dinner is a special addition to the indoor comforts of a winter day. For a Valentine celebration, there is no better place to cook and dine.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.