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Fighting Words

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NEWS
December 3, 2005
When rapper Kanye West appeared at the 1st Mariner Arena in Baltimore last month, much of his performance was noticeably absent of a word that is ubiquitous in his rap songs. For most of the show, the N-word - the actual word and not this substitute for the racial epithet - was not used. It was undoubtedly a conscious decision by Mr. West, who has admitted to feeling conflicted about using the word, and an indication of his sensitivity about its use by white people. Toward the end of the concert, however, when it came time to sing his catchy hit "Gold Digger," Mr. West announced to the white fans in the audience that it would be the only time they would be allowed to say the word.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 16, 2013
While the slaughter goes on in the Syrian civil war, a remarkable war of words has broken out over the threatened use of American force there, led by of all people Russian President Vladimir Putin. Moscow's strongman of the post-Cold War era, or at least some assigned wordsmith, wrote an op-ed piece in the New York Times making a clever pitch for taking the dispute to the United Nations, where an anticipated Russian veto had deterred the United States from doing so in the first place.
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SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | September 9, 1993
Why does boxing do it, predictably, incessantly and without shame?While it's true many of today's marquee fights aren't worth the canvas they're fought on and require gobs of hype, every so often a bout comes along that can stand on its own. Such a matchup is tomorrow night's Julio Cesar Chavez-Pernell Whitaker bash.Clearly, these guys are the best, masters of their craft and champions. But, according to the way the fight game is run, that's not enough. Cue the balloons."This has been such a natural right from the start," says Jay Larkin of Showtime, in on negotiations for the pay-per-view presentation right from the start.
NEWS
By Ty Alexander | November 21, 2011
As Sheree said, "Life isn't full of cherries and berries!" I think I told you guys this would be a good one. I was giving a lot of side eyes and girl pleases to my television. This episode was full of shockers from Kim's wedding-inspired baby shower, to Sheree building a home from the ground up as if there's any other way (SMH), to Peter and Apollo's overly hyped argument which was overshadowed by Apollo's extremely high-pitched angry voice.
NEWS
June 24, 1992
Does the First Amendment to the Constitution protect the right to burn a cross, Ku Klux Klan style, in a black American's yard? We thought not. Freedom of speech is cherished, but no one has ever convincingly argued that it is an absolute right. False and damaging accusations are not protected by the First Amendment, nor is child pornography, nor until now so-called "fighting words." That is speech conveying a threatening message of imminent harm and violence. The Supreme Court enunciated its fighting words doctrine exactly 50 years ago. This week in a narrow 5-4 opinion the court in effect overturned that doctrine.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau Staff writer James M. Coram contributed to this article | June 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In a celebrated case over a cross-burning on a black family's lawn, the Supreme Court yesterday appeared to take away almost all the government's power to outlaw messages of hate in speech or symbolic gesture.Citing free speech rights but widely split on their approach, the justices voted 9-0 to strike down a St. Paul, Minn., ordinance that banned cross-burning, Nazi swastika displays and other expression of racial supremacy and bias.The 4-year-old ordinance was used against a white teen-ager for burning a crude homemade cross in the yard of a neighbor -- a black family -- in June 1990.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 4, 1999
WHEN KHALID Muhammad, the deposed Nation of Islam hatchet man, applied for a permit to hold another 2,000-screwball march today, New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani applied the "fool me once, shame on you/fool me twice, shame on me" adage.No way was Muhammad getting another permit to march this year, Giuliani declared. Not after last year's debacle when Muhammad exhorted marchers to engage in violence against police officers if they moved in to lawfully disperse the rally that was supposed to end at 4 p.m. Last year, Giuliani called Muhammad's event a "hate march" but -- contrary to most media reports -- granted a permit for it.Not so this year.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 24, 1992
You might have thought Monday's Supreme Court ruling on government laws against hate crimes was going to be clear and concise -- especially with all nine justices voting the same way. If the vote goes 9-0, one assumes all justices agreed on the major points and had a nice lunch together. And with such unanimity in the black robes, how could the law of the land not be absolutely explicit?In its ruling, the court struck down as unconstitutional a St. Paul, Minn., city ordinance that banned cross-burnings, spray-painted swastikas and other forms of hate speech and symbolism.
NEWS
By MELVIN SALBERG and ABRAHAM H. FOXMAN | September 1, 1992
Yusuf Hawkins. Julio Rivera. Yankel Rosenbaum. All three met their deaths because of bigotry.Hardly a week passes without a news story reporting the pain and anguish experienced by bias-crime victims and their communities.At a time when hate-motivated violence is on the rise, a U.S. Supreme Court decision has unfortunately cast doubts on the validity of all hate-crime statutes.The decision struck down a hate-crime ordinance in St. Paul, Minn., in spite of Justice John Paul Stevens' warning that ''One need look no further than the recent social unrest in the nation's cities to see that race-based threats may cause more harm to society and to individuals than other threats.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2001
A few of the Ravens' players strolled through the locker room yesterday, carrying videotapes and no apparent fighting words ... at least for now. Unlike the situation last week with the AFC Central rival Tennessee Titans, the Ravens don't have a running dialogue with the Oakland Raiders. Instead of starting verbal warfare with the Raiders, the players seemed more intent on dissecting film of their opponent for the AFC championship game. Does that unfamiliarity mean the once-brash Ravens will be giving Oakland the silent treatment this week?
NEWS
By Nicole Gaouette and Nicole Gaouette,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 30, 2007
WASHINGTON -- American churches coined the phrase, but among Republican presidential candidates, "sanctuary city" has become a dirty phrase. At Wednesday's GOP presidential debate, the issue sparked hard-edged exchanges between two of the leading contenders for the party's nomination. Mitt Romney accused Rudolph W. Giuliani of running a "sanctuary city" as mayor of New York because of policies that shielded illegal immigrants from being reported to federal authorities. Giuliani disputed that label, and derided the former Massachusetts governor for living in a "sanctuary mansion" where illegal immigrants did contract work.
NEWS
December 3, 2005
When rapper Kanye West appeared at the 1st Mariner Arena in Baltimore last month, much of his performance was noticeably absent of a word that is ubiquitous in his rap songs. For most of the show, the N-word - the actual word and not this substitute for the racial epithet - was not used. It was undoubtedly a conscious decision by Mr. West, who has admitted to feeling conflicted about using the word, and an indication of his sensitivity about its use by white people. Toward the end of the concert, however, when it came time to sing his catchy hit "Gold Digger," Mr. West announced to the white fans in the audience that it would be the only time they would be allowed to say the word.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2004
QUEENSTOWN - The serenity is all on the surface in this unspoiled Eastern Shore enclave tucked between two busy highways. Inside Potter's Pantry, where owner Nicole Potter serves lunch and breakfast, passions are running high. She worries that the 300-year-old town will be transformed into yet another sprawling suburb like Kent Island, which she calls "Kent Burnie." Across Main Street in Town Hall, the municipal government is weighing plans to annex more than 450 acres so a developer can build more than 900 houses and increase the town's population of 600 nearly fivefold.
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2004
It's a pretty safe bet that Joseph J. Philbin's name will not be mentioned this week when the Supreme Court hears arguments in the case challenging the constitutionality of the words "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance. But if he were alive today, Philbin would surely have something to say about the matter. He'd likely begin by reminding his fellow Baltimoreans that he had proposed the idea of adding "under God" to the pledge in 1952 - two years before President Eisenhower signed the congressional bill that made the change law on Flag Day 1954.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
MIAMI - Eddie Bartee Jr. practically has molten steel coursing through his blood: He grew up in Sparrows Point. His father spent 26 years as a leader of the United Steelworkers local at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s sprawling plant at the mouth of the Patapsco River in eastern Baltimore County. And when Bartee began working at the factory three decades ago, he joined more than two dozen other family members already there. But since Bethlehem filed for bankruptcy protection last year and its shrunken Baltimore plant was taken over by International Steel Group Inc. of Cleveland, Bartee has seen many of those relatives struggle with the loss of pension and health care benefits in retirement.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | April 28, 2003
Dana Gioia has a hard time keeping his mouth shut. The National Book Award-winning poet has a penchant for bold, splashy statements that tip over the establishment wheelbarrow and get people riled up. So what's he doing as head of the National Endowment for the Arts -- surely one of the most politically sensitive jobs in the land? Gioia, 52, leans forward, smiles widely and says, "I promise to do my best to be a very good boy," a statement that, with its air of playful mockery, simultaneously makes a guarantee and takes it away.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | February 11, 1994
Boston. -- It is a miserable day on the planet, or at least on the northern part of the planet's Western Hemisphere, and CBS begins the evening news with a report on the relentless cold. The camera homes in on a young, neat, specimen of the Chicago tundra. The man is asked his opinion of the winter wonderland and he answers cheerily: ''It sucks.''My sentiments exactly.But not my language.The next night, another of the cameras endlessly stalking Tonya Harding films her while she practices her routine.
SPORTS
By Jerome Holtzman and Jerome Holtzman,Chicago Tribune | December 3, 1992
CHICAGO -- The Marge Schott controversy, which has grown into a media circus, presents an interesting legal question of freedom of speech. She is the owner of the Cincinnati Reds and has been accused of making oral slurs against blacks and Jews, the usual targets.Home run king Hank Aaron, a vice president of the Atlanta Braves, insists Schott should be forced to sell her team and should be thrown out of baseball. Others, outraged but less militant, contend a one- or two-year suspension would be sufficient punishment.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2001
A few of the Ravens' players strolled through the locker room yesterday, carrying videotapes and no apparent fighting words ... at least for now. Unlike the situation last week with the AFC Central rival Tennessee Titans, the Ravens don't have a running dialogue with the Oakland Raiders. Instead of starting verbal warfare with the Raiders, the players seemed more intent on dissecting film of their opponent for the AFC championship game. Does that unfamiliarity mean the once-brash Ravens will be giving Oakland the silent treatment this week?
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 4, 1999
WHEN KHALID Muhammad, the deposed Nation of Islam hatchet man, applied for a permit to hold another 2,000-screwball march today, New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani applied the "fool me once, shame on you/fool me twice, shame on me" adage.No way was Muhammad getting another permit to march this year, Giuliani declared. Not after last year's debacle when Muhammad exhorted marchers to engage in violence against police officers if they moved in to lawfully disperse the rally that was supposed to end at 4 p.m. Last year, Giuliani called Muhammad's event a "hate march" but -- contrary to most media reports -- granted a permit for it.Not so this year.
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