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By Los Angeles Times | November 28, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Hot on the heels of his "Rocky V," director John Avildsen is preparing to jump back into the ring. But this time, heavy themes accompany the heavy punches. The central character of "The Power of One" lives in South Africa, circa 1950, when the country is in transition from an English colony to an Afrikaner state."The story takes place as the curtain of apartheid is descending," says screenwriter Robert Mark Kamen, who previously teamed with director Avildsen for the three "Karate Kid" titles.
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NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1998
As a boxer, Sutherland "Johnny" Cunningham was a jabber, a dancer who packed a power punch. He was tall and lanky, could bob and weave, and usually went the distance.He lived and fought out of Baltimore, and though he never had a winning record, he surprised a lot of fighters, including a lightweight champ against whom he won a decision in 1953.Mr. Cunningham, 69, of West Baltimore, died Wednesday of respiratory failure at St. Agnes Hospital.His boxing career lasted more than a decade. He retired in 1958 with a record of 13 wins, 42 defeats and four draws.
NEWS
May 8, 1991
What a difference a day makes. Before the Air Force decided to give the Advanced Technology Fighter contract to a team led by Lockheed, Northrop Corp. was working on the biggest military aircraft job ever, building the B-2 bomber. Then, Northrop and partner McDonnell Douglas became doubtful finishers in the long-term race for survival in the business of making warplanes. Lockheed, which hasn't had a top fighter since the F-104, teamed with General Dynamics and Boeing, which hadn't made one in 50 years.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1997
If professional boxing is too staid, if soap operas aren't melodramatic enough, there's always the issue of military aircraft in Congress to put a little spice in life.Dial it up over the next several days and see which expensive program is currently getting nuzzles and nibbles and which is leaving cartilage on the canvas.The stakes are high, with hundreds of millions of dollars and tens of thousands of defense contractor jobs riding on the preferences of politicians. Programs that are out of favor one year can suddenly rise again, as the B-2 bomber appears to be doing with unexpected support from the House.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | May 30, 1992
Veteran Baltimore manager-trainer Mack Lewis attended the International Boxing Federation convention in Orlando, Fla., this week.His main purpose was to arrange a title fight for his junior-middleweight contender, Vincent Pettway.Instead, he received an award from the boxing group yesterday.Lewis, 71, who has been training fighters at his Broadway gym for over 50 years, was named the IBF's "Sportsman of the Year.""It's a real nice honor," said Lewis, "but I'd rather have signed a contract for Pettway to fight [IBF 154-pound champion]
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | April 21, 1991
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- If George Foreman is as clever as think he might be, he retires now. He made the money. He got better press than Norm Schwarzkopf. The fighter-turned-preacher-turned-fighter can go back to preaching and claim, without fear of contradiction, to have found the strength of Samson. He might even get a shoe commercial out of it. He's got to get a hamburger endorsement, or this isn't the America I know.What more can he reasonably accomplish? You only get so many moral victories in life.
NEWS
By Jack Shanahan | May 22, 2000
PERHAPS THE most unexpected - and intelligent - act by last year's Congress was the vote by the House to cut one of the largest single items in the federal budget: Construction funds for the Pentagon's F-22 fighter jet. The vote was overwhelming, 379 to 45. After the House vote, a highly unusual scenario unfolded as President Clinton joined Senate Republicans in calling for the full restoration of F-22 funds. The White House threatened to veto the defense appropriations bill over this issue.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A new generation fighter to replace the Navy's aging and troubled F-14 Tomcat -- grounded temporarily Thursday after a third crash in a month -- is being flight tested at Patuxent River Naval Air Station.A three-year program to prove the mettle of the F-18E and F-18F Super Hornet as the nation's premier carrier-based attack jet for the beginning of the 21st century started at the Southern Maryland base this week. The program, budgeted at more than $100 million, will support 400 high-paying engineering and scientific jobs.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | February 11, 1991
NEW YORK -- Ray Leonard didn't want anyone to misunderstand, so he announced his retirement in the ring, where truth, at least, is only occasionally a casualty."
NEWS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1996
The marriage of Boeing Co. and McDonnell Douglas Corp. will create a company that produces almost half of the aircraft on the planet, including major portions of virtually every American fighter jet.Bethesda's Lockheed Martin Corp. still claims the F-16 fighter plane. But Boeing may have bought itself the lead in the pivotal race to build a 21st-century warplane for three branches of the military.And the Seattle company has staked a prominent role in military space, acquiring a double shot at a major Air Force rocket contract.
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