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By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF Bloomberg Business News contributed to this article | April 19, 1996
The Federal Trade Commission yesterday approved Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin Corp.'s $9.1 billion acquisition of the bulk of Loral Corp. after Lockheed agreed to certain restrictions intended to ensure fair competition.FTC commissioners voted 5-0 in favor of the acquisition of the New York company that is the nation's fifth largest defense contractor.The restrictions to which Lockheed agreed address the government's concerns that the purchase might violate antitrust laws by reducing competition for satellites, fighter aircraft and other military projects.
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NEWS
September 27, 2011
The news from the European Institute for Particle Physics is that Albert Einstein may have been wrong ("Faster than light", Sept. 23). The speed of light may not be insurmountable, and everything we think we know about the universe may be wrong. Of course, we have no more idea of what it will mean to future generations than the first readers of Einstein's theories did. Did physicists 100 years ago envision nuclear medicine, atomic power, deep space travel or any of the thousand other ideas and inventions that grew directly or indirectly from Einstein's work?
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NEWS
September 27, 2011
The news from the European Institute for Particle Physics is that Albert Einstein may have been wrong ("Faster than light", Sept. 23). The speed of light may not be insurmountable, and everything we think we know about the universe may be wrong. Of course, we have no more idea of what it will mean to future generations than the first readers of Einstein's theories did. Did physicists 100 years ago envision nuclear medicine, atomic power, deep space travel or any of the thousand other ideas and inventions that grew directly or indirectly from Einstein's work?
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 5, 2004
WASHINGTON - Lockheed Martin Corp. received approval from the U.S. Department of Defense yesterday to move forward with development of the Joint Strike Fighter, the Pentagon's most costly weapon ever. Michael Wynne, acting undersecretary of defense for acquisition, approved the "path forward" for the program, and designs of short takeoff and vertical landing variants of the aircraft, in a memorandum, the Pentagon said. The decision moves the $244 billion development program a step closer to production of the fighters, a family of aircraft intended to have about 80 percent common parts for use by the Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and allied nations.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 5, 2004
WASHINGTON - Lockheed Martin Corp. received approval from the U.S. Department of Defense yesterday to move forward with development of the Joint Strike Fighter, the Pentagon's most costly weapon ever. Michael Wynne, acting undersecretary of defense for acquisition, approved the "path forward" for the program, and designs of short takeoff and vertical landing variants of the aircraft, in a memorandum, the Pentagon said. The decision moves the $244 billion development program a step closer to production of the fighters, a family of aircraft intended to have about 80 percent common parts for use by the Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and allied nations.
NEWS
By ROBERT J. HANKS | September 29, 1993
Alexandria, Virginia -- When Robert L. McNamara -- formerly assistant professor at Harvard University, later head of Ford Motor Company -- became secretary of defense in 1961, he brought to the Pentagon a host of bright young assistants and a determination to establish firm civilian control over the U.S. armed forces. With assistance from those youthful but militarily inexperienced executives (the so-called ''Whiz Kids''), he succeeded.He also brought a briefcase full of management techniques he had employed at Ford.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1997
The lineup now appears set in the race for the biggest defense contract ever: British Aerospace will join Lockheed Martin's effort to build the Joint Strike Fighter, the companies said yesterday.The much-anticipated announcement pits the top defense contractors in Europe and North America against a team led by Boeing Co. in an effort to build a 21st century aircraft worth about $300 billion.Boeing had sought the hand of British Aerospace, seen as a must-have partner because the British navy is one of four customers for the Joint Strike Fighter -- along with the U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marines.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1993
Saks plans global expansionSaks Fifth Avenue plans to have 120 stores open worldwide within five years, Vice Chairman Philip Miller said. The company, whose 49 stores generated $1.3 billion in revenue in the latest fiscal year, plans to open department stores as well as specialty stores.Mr. Miller said the company plans to expand in Europe, the Far East and Mexico. He also said the company plans an initial public offering within the next three to five years.Martin Marietta in Greek dealMartin Marietta Corp.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
Fighter jets will take to the Baltimore skies next week in a drill designed to test response capabilities for a terrorism threat, according to officials from the North American Aerospace Defense Command. NORAD said other exercises will take place in Washington, Richmond, Va., and northern West Virginia but participants do not know the date or time. Residents of those areas may see NORAD fighter aircraft in close proximity to Department of Defense aviation practicing intercept and identification procedures.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | August 17, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Lockheed Martin Corp. asked the Federal Trade Commission to approve the sale of a unit it was required to sell to gain antitrust approval for its $9.1 billion purchase of Loral Corp.Lockheed said it plans to sell SETA Services Operations to Washington Consulting Group, a Bethesda-based company that provides technical consulting services to federal agencies, including the Federal Aviation Administration.The sale price wasn't disclosed.It was SETA Services' relationship with the FAA that led the FTC to request the divestiture after the Loral purchase.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1997
The lineup now appears set in the race for the biggest defense contract ever: British Aerospace will join Lockheed Martin's effort to build the Joint Strike Fighter, the companies said yesterday.The much-anticipated announcement pits the top defense contractors in Europe and North America against a team led by Boeing Co. in an effort to build a 21st century aircraft worth about $300 billion.Boeing had sought the hand of British Aerospace, seen as a must-have partner because the British navy is one of four customers for the Joint Strike Fighter -- along with the U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marines.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF Bloomberg Business News contributed to this article | April 19, 1996
The Federal Trade Commission yesterday approved Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin Corp.'s $9.1 billion acquisition of the bulk of Loral Corp. after Lockheed agreed to certain restrictions intended to ensure fair competition.FTC commissioners voted 5-0 in favor of the acquisition of the New York company that is the nation's fifth largest defense contractor.The restrictions to which Lockheed agreed address the government's concerns that the purchase might violate antitrust laws by reducing competition for satellites, fighter aircraft and other military projects.
NEWS
By ROBERT J. HANKS | September 29, 1993
Alexandria, Virginia -- When Robert L. McNamara -- formerly assistant professor at Harvard University, later head of Ford Motor Company -- became secretary of defense in 1961, he brought to the Pentagon a host of bright young assistants and a determination to establish firm civilian control over the U.S. armed forces. With assistance from those youthful but militarily inexperienced executives (the so-called ''Whiz Kids''), he succeeded.He also brought a briefcase full of management techniques he had employed at Ford.
NEWS
November 19, 1995
GERMANY'S HAPLESS PARTY of the left, the once-proud SPD of Willy Brandt and Helmut Schmidt, has turned left once again in its frustrating battle against the CDU's perennially triumphant Chancellor Helmut Kohl. After losing in 1990, the SPD dumped Oskar Lafontaine, the fiery populist who dared to poor-mouth reunification of East and West Germany, and turned to a relative centrist, the bland and boring Rudolf Scharping. But Mr. Scharping also proved a loser in last year's elections. So what was the directionless party to do?
EXPLORE
October 9, 2012
The Wings of Freedom tour - a display and exhibit of vintage World War II bomber and fighter aircraft - is scheduled to make its annual visit to Carroll County from Friday through Monday, Oct. 12-15, at the Carroll County Regional Airport, 200 Airport Drive, Westminster. Planes slated to be on display - with some even available for pre-scheduled rides - include a B-17, B-24 and P-51 Mustang. The weekend event will include re-enactors displaying WW II-era military equipment, special guests and food vendors.
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