Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFighter
IN THE NEWS

Fighter

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
Elly Wierda, a volunteer who was a member of the Dutch Resistance during World War II, died July 7 of cancer at her Rock Hall home. She was 88. Born Elly Klein Bog, the daughter of a wealthy textile company owner and a homemaker, she was raised in Amsterdam, where she received her education. During World War II, she joined the resistance movement in her homeland. With the cessation of hostilities in 1945, she went to Germany seeking art that had been looted during the Nazi occupation of Holland.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 4, 2014
Matthew VanDyke, the self-styled "Arab Spring Freedom Fighter" from Baltimore, was a friend of the two American journalists who were beheaded by Islamic State militants. VanDyke met James Foley and Steven Sotloff during his travels in Libya, and it was Foley to whom he first confided what we all later came to learn - that VanDyke was neither a journalist nor a filmmaker when he was captured and held in a Libyan prison for six months in 2011. Instead, he had gone there to fight with the rebels who eventually overthrew dictator Muammar Gaddafi.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 25, 1991
The majority of callers to SUNDIAL support the Air Force's new generation of costly Stealth fighter planes.The Air Force has awarded a contract to a Lockheed team to build about 650 Stealth fighter planes for about $65 billion. Of 438 callers yesterday, 301, or 69 percent, said they supported the plan to build and purchase the fighters, while 137 callers said they did not support the plan."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
NEWS
By Christi Parsons, Tribune Washington Bureau | June 26, 2014
- President Barack Obama asked Congress on Thursday for the first time to approve direct U.S. military training for Syrian rebels, but he remains deeply ambivalent about intervening in a deadly conflict that has spilled over into neighboring Iraq, U.S. officials said. Obama asked for $500 million to "train and equip" opposition fighters in Syria who officials said will be "appropriately vetted" to ensure they have no ties to militant Islamic fighters fighting Bashar al Assad's regime.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1994
After a recent training session at his Broadway gym, veteran manager-trainer Mack Lewis decided it was time to tell welterweight Wade Duncan the facts of life."
SPORTS
By Phil Berger and Phil Berger,New York Times | June 24, 1991
LAS VEGAS -- You remember the first time Mike Tyson and Donovan "Razor" Ruddock went at it here. The bout was March 18 and it ended in controversy when referee Richard Steele stopped it in the seventh round with what seemed undue haste, proclaiming Tyson the winner.Steele's action precipitated a post-fight ruckus in the ring between both fighters' camps and brought a howl of protest from a crowd that only a round earlier had seen Ruddock connect with punches apparently potent enough to register on the Richter scale.
NEWS
By John F. Burns and John F. Burns,New York Times News Service | November 27, 1992
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- What Borislav Herak remembers most vividly about the sunny morning in late June when he and two companions gunned down 10 members of a Muslim family is the small girl, about 10, who tried to hide behind her grandmother as the three Serbian nationalist soldiers opened fire from a distance of about 10 paces."
BUSINESS
April 16, 1998
The Pentagon delayed for a year yesterday a decision on whether to begin producing the new F-22 stealth fighter, but said the $62 billion Lockheed Martin Corp. program is not in trouble.Undersecretary of Defense Jacques Gansler, criticized by Congress for moving too quickly on the F-22, said the Defense Department would decide on low-rate production in December 1999 instead of late this year, as scheduled, so it can examine additional test results.But he stressed that initial flight testing of the plane had gone well and that $595 million would be committed to Lockheed at the end of this year to build two additional "production representative" aircraft in 1999.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1997
There are no gracefully lethal curves on this fighter plane. The F-22 looks like it was designed for pain, as flat and sharp as a blade.The Air Force intends the F-22 stealth fighter to be the grimmest perdition to darken the skies since mythological times. It can smoke anything that flies without even showing up on radar, the Air Force says, and perform any maneuver a human can stand.With the first of its breed set to fly in May, the F-22 marks a new era for the military and a new generation of corporate sustenance for the plane's builders -- Lockheed Martin Corp.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | August 6, 1991
The Air Force announced yesterday the release of nearly $11 billion in contracts for the full-scale development of the first 13 production models of the new Advanced Tactical Fighter that is designed to provide the United States with air superiority well into the 21st century.And at least a portion of that money is expected to trickle down into Maryland's struggling economy.The bulk of the money, about $9.5 billion, goes to the contracting team of Lockheed Corp., Boeing Co. and General Dynamics Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
The Firefly Music Festival is not for everyone, especially for those that find much of the following unappealing: Multiple days of camping, ironic tank-tops, drinking games, Grateful Dead tapestries, dust, drug dealers, bugs, hydration packs, portable toilets, 30-minute treks from camp to the festival grounds, high-waisted shorts, flying glow sticks and bad tanlines. For the rest of us - and there were approximately 80,000 music fans in attendance, according to Billboard - the four-day music festival that took place from Thursday to Sunday in Dover, Del., was an unofficial kickoff to summer celebration that was thrilling and - if we're being honest - draining.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Fifth in a series of profiles of candidates for governor. When he campaigns in residential areas, Democrat Douglas F. Gansler practically sprints from door to door. He's trying to meet as many voters as he can. But it can appear he is chasing somebody. Which, metaphorically, he is. With the June 24 primary for governor approaching, Gansler, 51, trails Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown in the polls and is playing a role that suits the state attorney general's personality - the scrappy challenger.
SPORTS
By David Selig and The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
Spending just a little time around the guys from UFC, you quickly understand that mixed martial arts - and combat sports in general - are not quite set up the same way as your "traditional" sports. If the Orioles want to play in the World Series, they need to make it to the postseason and then win at least two playoff series. They can't just make a bunch of jokes about the Cardinals and expect to see them in the Fall Classic. UFC is set up in a way to showcase the best fighters, of course.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Col. Jesse D. Mitchell Jr., a World War II P-51 Mustang combat fighter pilot who later commanded the Maryland National Guard's 175th Tactical Fighter Group, died Friday of cancer at the Charlestown Retirement Community. He was 90. The son of Jesse D. Mitchell Sr., a Koppers Co. machinist, and Mildred M. Davis Mitchell, a homemaker, Jesse Duvall Mitchell Jr. was born and raised in Severn. Colonel Mitchell's interest in flying began early in his childhood when he built model airplanes out of balsa wood.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Police and relatives of abducted girl Caitlyn Virts credited the use of the Amber Alert system and the quick, eager fingers of social media users with helping authorities find the 11-year-old in Florence, S.C., on Friday. Baltimore County Police Chief James W. Johnson said at a news conference Saturday that police now have powerful tools to quickly alert large numbers of people about missing children - and dubbed people who see notifications and feed tips to police "keyboard crime fighters.
NEWS
By Tony Solesky | November 14, 2013
I fully support liberating any animal from abuse. It does not follow however, that rescued animals - pit bulls in particular - should be pushed as companion pets by shelters and rescue organizations. Terry Douglass of Baltimore became the 25th dog bite related fatality nationally this year when she was mauled to death by her own pit bull on Nov. 1. In the days since her passing there have been three more of these gruesome deaths, according to DogBites.org. Nearly all of the 28 people killed by dogs - 15 of them children ranging in ages from 14 months to 7 years - were killed by pit bulls.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | November 5, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Boeing Co. is pursuing a new military jet that could put it back in the fighter plane business for the first time in almost 60 years.And Boeing isn't talking of just getting back in the business; it's pondering re-entering on a grand scale with a fighter that could ++ serve the Air Force, fly from carriers for the Navy and lift off vertically for the Marines.The aircraft would be "what we think is the fighter of the future," says Peri Widener, spokeswoman for Boeing's Defense and Space Group.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A contracting team led by Lockheed Corp. won a historic high-stakes contest yesterday to supply the Air Force with a $70 billion arsenal of sophisticated fighter jets, known as the Advanced Tactical Fighter, well into the next century.The team -- which includes Boeing Co. and General Dynamics Corp. -- beat out a rival partnership of Northrop Corp. and McDonnell Douglas Corp. for what Air Force officials called the largest aerospace contract ever. Both teams spent five years and a total of $1.4 billion developing and testing prototype aircraft in competition to secure the lucrative military business.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
In the growing struggle to curb stormwater pollution fouling urban streams and the Chesapeake Bay, one of the most promising tools could turn out to be the humble radish. On a vacant lot in Northeast Baltimore, a researcher from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County is testing the potential of daikon or forage radishes to turn badly compacted city dirt into a natural sponge for rainwater. Stuart S. Schwartz, a senior scientist with UMBC's Center for Urban Environmental Research and Education, hopes the experiment, dubbed B'more Rad, can find out whether cities could benefit from a plant that farmers in Maryland and elsewhere are increasingly raising as a cover crop to reduce polluted runoff from their fields.
NEWS
By Laura Neuman | July 11, 2013
The Anne Arundel County government recently negotiated mutually agreeable contracts with 12 of the 13 unions that represent our workers during labor union talks. The Local 1563 International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) would have been the 13th, but we could not come to a successful agreement. The IAFF rejected the county administration's proposal for a two-year contract that provided the return to a three-shift, 48 hour work week effective January 1, 2014. The proposal included a 14.3 percent pay increase, a 3 percent merit increase on the employee's anniversary date and a 3 percent cost of living increase.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.