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By Barry Considine | February 24, 2014
In 1982, the late Gov. William Donald Schaefer was running for his last term as mayor. He held one of those big dinners that politicians are famous for at P.J. Crickets on Pratt St. All the political leaders were there. I was the chef that evening and can honestly tell you this: When I arrived at the restaurant that afternoon, I climbed in to the back of my blue VW Mini-Camper and smoked a bowl of marijuana. That evening many of the attendees stuck their heads into the kitchen to thank the chef for the wonderful meal they had enjoyed.
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NEWS
By Barry Considine | February 24, 2014
In 1982, the late Gov. William Donald Schaefer was running for his last term as mayor. He held one of those big dinners that politicians are famous for at P.J. Crickets on Pratt St. All the political leaders were there. I was the chef that evening and can honestly tell you this: When I arrived at the restaurant that afternoon, I climbed in to the back of my blue VW Mini-Camper and smoked a bowl of marijuana. That evening many of the attendees stuck their heads into the kitchen to thank the chef for the wonderful meal they had enjoyed.
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NEWS
September 27, 2013
After seeing the security tapes of the Navy Yard shooter in the hallways, it's hard to believe the building's surveillance cameras are not monitored in real time. Had this been the case, the shooter could have been stopped long before he killed so many. Many office buildings and high rise condominium buildings do this, so why not the Navy Yard? Some are quick to blame guns, but look at the lack of security at what is supposed to be a very secure place. This outcome could have been much different.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
To pretend that Vi Ripken's experiences are a statistical fluke is to miss yet another opportunity to come to grip with the reality we all need to face ("Aberdeen perplexed by attacks on Vi Ripken," Oct. 16). These upsetting criminal acts are not a statistical anomaly. Ms. Ripken's alleged attacker, Jesse Bowen, has reportedly had 12 prior arrests, four of which resulted in convictions, and had been out on $7,500 bail at the time of the most recent incident. Violence is and has been spreading across our nation.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
To pretend that Vi Ripken's experiences are a statistical fluke is to miss yet another opportunity to come to grip with the reality we all need to face ("Aberdeen perplexed by attacks on Vi Ripken," Oct. 16). These upsetting criminal acts are not a statistical anomaly. Ms. Ripken's alleged attacker, Jesse Bowen, has reportedly had 12 prior arrests, four of which resulted in convictions, and had been out on $7,500 bail at the time of the most recent incident. Violence is and has been spreading across our nation.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | July 31, 1994
It has become a mantra. Ask a candidate what's on voters' minds and the answer always includes crime.Sara Engram is editorial-page director of The Evening Sun.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | March 17, 1992
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke asked about 250 people at the War Memorial last night for their opinions on how to battle city crime, and he received advice ranging from sanitation removal to bringing back prayer in the schools.While some spoke of traditional crime-fighting methods such as increases in patrols and tougher criminal penalties, many had more unusual strategies in mind."It would be a step in the right direction if everyone went home tonight and threw away their television," said Rusty White, president of the Northwest Citizens Patrol group.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | October 20, 1996
CRIME IN AMERICA ranks high on the list of worries of American voters. And no wonder. Whether it's the searing sound of gunshots in city streets or the theft of a child's bicycle in a quieter neighborhood, fear of becoming the next statistic has become a fact of life for too many people.Voter disgust with crime has registered with politicians, and they have responded. Yet in one of the fascinating contradictions of American politics, while the trend in many other areas is to cut budgets and return more power to the states, crime-fighting legislation is producing escalating expenditures for law-enforcement and prison budgets.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 9, 1995
Charlie Stull does business out of two storefronts in the 1400 block of W. Baltimore St. -- a used-furniture store and a second-hand clothing shop. One day last month, he was standing in the clothing shop when a guy walked in with a bed frame. He asked if Charlie wanted to buy it. Charlie squinted and closely examined the frame, and something apparent became obvious: It was Charlie's bed frame; the guy had lifted it from the store next door, walked about 30 paces, and tried to sell it to him.Charlie grabbed the guy. His wife called 911. "Do you know it took 37 1/2 minutes for the police to come?"
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 30, 1991
POVERTY DOESN'T cause crime. Crime causes poverty. Therefore, to fight poverty, fight crime.How does crime cause poverty? Suppose your family lives just above the poverty line. A burglar breaks into your house and steals all your clothes. What it costs you to replace them drops you into poverty, since you no longer have the minimum needed for food and shelter.Or suppose you're on your way home from work. A mugger takes your paycheck and beats you up so badly that you have to miss another week's work.
NEWS
October 12, 2013
Retired state police captain Leigh Maddox is absolutely right about Gov. Martin O'Malley's misplaced emphasis on law enforcement ( "O'Malley is wrong: More arrests mean more crime," Oct. 7). When it comes to drugs, an increase in arrests could actually increase crime. Attempts to limit supply while drug demand remains constant only increase the profitability of trafficking. For addictive drugs like heroin, a spike in street prices leads desperate addicts to increase their criminal activity to feed desperate habits.
NEWS
September 27, 2013
After seeing the security tapes of the Navy Yard shooter in the hallways, it's hard to believe the building's surveillance cameras are not monitored in real time. Had this been the case, the shooter could have been stopped long before he killed so many. Many office buildings and high rise condominium buildings do this, so why not the Navy Yard? Some are quick to blame guns, but look at the lack of security at what is supposed to be a very secure place. This outcome could have been much different.
NEWS
September 25, 2013
Police activity has little or no effect on crime rates ( "Baltimore Police ditch 'stop and frisk' in name but not practice," Sept. 23). Crime is basically driven by economics. People on the economic edge of survival turn to crime to keep from falling into abject poverty. The poorer the people, the greater the incentive for crime. Baltimore has a lot of people on the economic edge, and the city is also a hub of the illegal drug business, which can be a way out of poverty. The combination ensures a high crime rate.
FEATURES
By Zach Sparks, For The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2013
When passersby drive through West Baltimore's Sandtown-Winchester community, they won't see flags symbolizing unity or notice traces of an affluent town. What they will see is a neighborhood once riddled with drug trade and prostitution, now being transformed with the help of activists like Pastor C.W. Harris. A native of Sandtown-Winchester, Harris is one of 15 BMe Leadership Award recipients being recognized as black men doing their part to better Baltimore. Funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Open Society Foundations, BMe (Black Male Engagement)
NEWS
March 24, 2013
Baltimore City Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts is still relatively new on his job, so it's probably unfair to make too much of his unfortunate response to a question last week about the recent spate of gun violence that left nine people dead on the city's west side. "Though we're having a spike in homicides," Mr. Batts said, "our organization is working better, faster and smoother, and you can see it in the overall stats. " There was nothing factually wrong in Mr. Batts' answer; department statistics show an 8 percent drop in crimes of all types over this time last year.
NEWS
By Dutch Ruppersberger | February 12, 2013
It's like a recurring bad dream. March: Hackers allegedly steal the credit card numbers from 1.5 million Visa and MasterCard customers by breaking into the computer systems of the company's payment processor in New York. The thieves stockpiled the stolen credit card numbers for months before beginning to use them. August: Cyber attackers disrupt production from Saudi Aramco, the world's largest exporter of crude oil, taking out 30,000 computers in the process, according to press reports.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | April 4, 1993
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden announced a program yesterday to help communities fight crime: grants of up to $2,000 for things such as block-watch signs and walkie-talkies for community patrols."
FEATURES
By Henry Scarupa | May 29, 1991
Murder and other violent crimes are getting out of hand -- and local followers of the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi intend to put a stop to them.How do they propose to fight crime? Through twice-daily, 20-minute group practices of Transcendental Meditation (TM). If enough people in an area meditate together, they believe, they can change the social and economic climate.This is called the "Maharishi effect," and followers of the Maharishi have recently launched such a program at a center in Pikesville and a dozen or so TM centers in the greater Washington area.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
Jon J. Grow, a former Baltimore police detective who became a nationally recognized bunco expert and co-founded and served as executive director of the National Association of Bunco Investigators, died Sunday of pancreatic cancer at his Parkton home. He was 70. The word "bunco" is derived from the Spanish word for banking and means a swindling game. Mr. Grow's work targeted the con artists, swindlers, pickpockets and confidence men and women who preyed primarily on the elderly and trusting.
NEWS
May 30, 2012
The Sun's recent "Your turn" commentary regarding downtown crime ("A 10 t h floor view of crime," May 26) speaks the truth. We certainly need more such pieces to properly understand Baltimore's crime problems and to address them. What we are hearing from the city's mayor repeatedly is that there is no real problem, that the crime situation in downtown Baltimore is distorted and that "statistics" show that violent crime is down. But who really believes her? We kid ourselves if we believe so. We don't want to go to where we are outraged with the crime problem.
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