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Fight Club

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
"If you hold the door for someone and they don't say, 'Thank you,' that person deserves to be in hell," Chuck Palahniuk rails - in the most mild-mannered way possible. "It also ticks me off when someone pushes the button on the elevator more than once," complains the author of two nonfiction books and 13 works of fiction, including "Fight Club. " "Pretty much everyone in New York is going to hell, because they never push that button fewer than 20 times. " Perhaps it's not surprising that Palahniuk's latest novel is "Doomed," in which the characters are routinely condemned to eternal damnation for such minor social sins as passing gas in public.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
"If you hold the door for someone and they don't say, 'Thank you,' that person deserves to be in hell," Chuck Palahniuk rails - in the most mild-mannered way possible. "It also ticks me off when someone pushes the button on the elevator more than once," complains the author of two nonfiction books and 13 works of fiction, including "Fight Club. " "Pretty much everyone in New York is going to hell, because they never push that button fewer than 20 times. " Perhaps it's not surprising that Palahniuk's latest novel is "Doomed," in which the characters are routinely condemned to eternal damnation for such minor social sins as passing gas in public.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | May 3, 2009
Taneytown, Md. -Author Chuck Palahniuk is sitting on a red and gold camelback sofa in the parlor room of the Antrim 1844 Country Inn, picking loose fringe from the sofa and piling it neatly on the tea tray in front of him. Pachelbel's Canon in D Major is on the stereo. We drink from china decorated with magnolia blossoms, while Chuck considers the merits of various plastic body parts, which he tosses out to the audience during readings of his high-testosterone novels. His most famous book is Fight Club, which was made into a 1999 film with Brad Pitt; his newest novel, Pygmy, will be published this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
Elvis will not be leaving the building Saturday. Nor will any of the other contestants in Elvis' Birthday Fight Club, a combination battle-to-the-finish boxing grudge match and burlesque show where past champions have included a chicken and a vibrating robot. "We like to think of ourselves as either burlesque-plus or theater-minus," explains Elvis' Birthday Fight Club (we'll go by EBFC from here on) founder-promoter-participant Jared Davis, who is bringing his creation to Highlandtown's Creative Alliance at the Patterson for the second straight year.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | October 15, 1999
Fight Club," David Fincher's explosively violent and compulsively watchable rumination on the emasculated state of modern manhood, wants men to know that it feels their pain.Combining the chicly distressed look and brutality of Fincher's "Seven" with the head trips of his next film, "The Game," "Fight Club" just might be a tentative foray into maturity on the part of the MTV-trained director. He has made a clever and surprisingly nuanced meditation on the clash of economics, consumer fetishism and ritual tribal aggression -- think of Susan Faludi's "Stiffed" on steroids.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 14, 2008
As every red-blooded American boy knows, the first rule about fight club is you don't talk about fight club - and the second rule of fight club is you don't talk about fight club. That goes triple for Never Back Down, not because it's a secret worth keeping, but because it's reprehensible. Tom Cruise lookalike Sean Faris stars as a brainy, fight-prone high school football star who moves from Iowa to Orlando, Fla. There he becomes involved with a crowd devoted to practicing mixed-martial arts in their clubs, schools and McMansions.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 14, 2006
NEW YORK -- The consistently brilliant Edward Norton is always talkin' 'bout his generation, whether he's describing himself to the press or acting in his favorite films. Again and again, he's gone after projects with a dissident edge. He loves to play complex renegades like the reformed white supremacist in American History X (1998), the discontented office rat turned fistfighter in Fight Club (1999), and the convicted drug dealer in 25th Hour (2002). They enable him to put flesh and bone on seminal questions about the way we live now. Promoting his new film and new favorite, Down in the Valley, in a Manhattan hotel room, Norton asks, "How can anybody figure out who they are or what's best about them when the culture around them gives them no spirituality, no sense of history, no sense of place, no sense of self?"
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2011
Normally, they're partners in public safety. But next month, Baltimore police and firefighters will be pummeling each other inside a cage – for charity. The Sept. 30 mixed martial arts event at the Du Burns Arena is being billed as a "night of live cage fights that include active law enforcement and firefighters," battling it out to raise money for injured officers. It's the first of its kind locally, though such "badges vs. hoses" matches have been growing in popularity across the country.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2001
Talk about your still lifes. In most art schools, budding Rembrandts paint bowls of bananas or reclining nudes to learn their craft. Megan Bluhm's first assignment was a pelvic bone in charcoal. The only nudes she sketches are dead. "They hold real still," she says. "That's the nice part about it." Bluhm is a modern student of an ancient art: medical illustration. Even in this world of high-tech imaging, medicine still relies on old-fashioned illustrators to show what's going on inside the human body.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
St. John's College senior Lydia Marie Hovey has a busy class schedule and participates in lots of school activities, but she still finds time to work on her hooks and power punches. Hovey, a Naperville, Ill., resident, is a member of the St. John's boxing club, which has recently revived a sport that was popular on the Annapolis campus in the 1940s and 1950s. The current coed club includes many who before joining knew little about the sport often referred to as "the sweet science. " They have not only learned boxing's tactical aspects and cardio benefits but have come to appreciate what it means to stand toe-to-toe with an opponent looking to knock his (or her)
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
St. John's College senior Lydia Marie Hovey has a busy class schedule and participates in lots of school activities, but she still finds time to work on her hooks and power punches. Hovey, a Naperville, Ill., resident, is a member of the St. John's boxing club, which has recently revived a sport that was popular on the Annapolis campus in the 1940s and 1950s. The current coed club includes many who before joining knew little about the sport often referred to as "the sweet science. " They have not only learned boxing's tactical aspects and cardio benefits but have come to appreciate what it means to stand toe-to-toe with an opponent looking to knock his (or her)
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2011
Normally, they're partners in public safety. But next month, Baltimore police and firefighters will be pummeling each other inside a cage – for charity. The Sept. 30 mixed martial arts event at the Du Burns Arena is being billed as a "night of live cage fights that include active law enforcement and firefighters," battling it out to raise money for injured officers. It's the first of its kind locally, though such "badges vs. hoses" matches have been growing in popularity across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 15, 2009
The movies are the movies, but what the Shaolin Warriors do up there on the stage is real. And when it comes to watching the impossible - like when a guy is balanced oh-so-precariously on the tips of a bunch of swords, or when men leap unbelievably high and seem to hover in the air - real makes all the difference. "It's seems almost other-worldly," says Kendra Whitlock Ingram, vice president and general manager of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, who was key in booking the Chinese martial-arts experts into the Meyerhoff for Sunday afternoon's scheduled performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | May 3, 2009
Taneytown, Md. -Author Chuck Palahniuk is sitting on a red and gold camelback sofa in the parlor room of the Antrim 1844 Country Inn, picking loose fringe from the sofa and piling it neatly on the tea tray in front of him. Pachelbel's Canon in D Major is on the stereo. We drink from china decorated with magnolia blossoms, while Chuck considers the merits of various plastic body parts, which he tosses out to the audience during readings of his high-testosterone novels. His most famous book is Fight Club, which was made into a 1999 film with Brad Pitt; his newest novel, Pygmy, will be published this week.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Jessica Anderson,Sun Reporter | June 30, 2008
Roland Park residents are putting up a fight to preserve what they have come to consider their own patch of green within the city. They're pledging to oppose plans announced this month by Baltimore Country Club to sell some of its land to Keswick Multi-Care Center, which plans to build a $195 million continuing-care retirement community. "This is truly like a volcano erupting," said Philip Spevak, president of the Roland Park Civic League. But Keswick officials - who would need a zoning change from the City Council for the project - said that a portion of the 17-acre site north of Hillside Road would be kept undeveloped, and they plan improvements for some of that area with expanded parks and gardens.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | June 3, 2008
I was one of the 4 million or so folks who watched the mixed martial arts prime-time coming-out party on CBS on Saturday night. From a purely ratings point of view, the telecast was a mixed bag for the network and perhaps for martial arts, in general. On the one hand, the MMA event, which featured Internet phenomenon Kimbo Slice in the last bout, produced a lower-than-usual rating for that time slot - Saturday, 9 p.m.-11 p.m. Programming that typically airs in that slot attracts 5.9 million viewers, and the fights produced by Elite XC drew 4.3 million, according to The New York Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
Elvis will not be leaving the building Saturday. Nor will any of the other contestants in Elvis' Birthday Fight Club, a combination battle-to-the-finish boxing grudge match and burlesque show where past champions have included a chicken and a vibrating robot. "We like to think of ourselves as either burlesque-plus or theater-minus," explains Elvis' Birthday Fight Club (we'll go by EBFC from here on) founder-promoter-participant Jared Davis, who is bringing his creation to Highlandtown's Creative Alliance at the Patterson for the second straight year.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | June 3, 2008
I was one of the 4 million or so folks who watched the mixed martial arts prime-time coming-out party on CBS on Saturday night. From a purely ratings point of view, the telecast was a mixed bag for the network and perhaps for martial arts, in general. On the one hand, the MMA event, which featured Internet phenomenon Kimbo Slice in the last bout, produced a lower-than-usual rating for that time slot - Saturday, 9 p.m.-11 p.m. Programming that typically airs in that slot attracts 5.9 million viewers, and the fights produced by Elite XC drew 4.3 million, according to The New York Times.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 14, 2008
As every red-blooded American boy knows, the first rule about fight club is you don't talk about fight club - and the second rule of fight club is you don't talk about fight club. That goes triple for Never Back Down, not because it's a secret worth keeping, but because it's reprehensible. Tom Cruise lookalike Sean Faris stars as a brainy, fight-prone high school football star who moves from Iowa to Orlando, Fla. There he becomes involved with a crowd devoted to practicing mixed-martial arts in their clubs, schools and McMansions.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 14, 2006
NEW YORK -- The consistently brilliant Edward Norton is always talkin' 'bout his generation, whether he's describing himself to the press or acting in his favorite films. Again and again, he's gone after projects with a dissident edge. He loves to play complex renegades like the reformed white supremacist in American History X (1998), the discontented office rat turned fistfighter in Fight Club (1999), and the convicted drug dealer in 25th Hour (2002). They enable him to put flesh and bone on seminal questions about the way we live now. Promoting his new film and new favorite, Down in the Valley, in a Manhattan hotel room, Norton asks, "How can anybody figure out who they are or what's best about them when the culture around them gives them no spirituality, no sense of history, no sense of place, no sense of self?"
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