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By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2002
ATLANTA -- Dane Fife's video inspiration is the basketball classic Hoosiers. His role is defensive stopper. And his method of locker room madness is designed to release his own tension as much as anyone else's. For the past three games of the NCAA tournament, Indiana's senior has been the equalizer for the Hoosiers. In a span of 10 giddy days, Fife has effectively shut down three of the tournament's best shooting guards. Next up: Maryland All-American Juan Dixon. It's a matchup that could go a long way toward determining tonight's NCAA championship game at the Georgia Dome.
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NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
For the Botts family of Owings Mills, the Fourth of July is a workout. Every family member marches with Monumental City Ancient Fife and Drum Corps, a group that plays about 15 performances a year - none more important than on Independence Day. Father Rich Bott plays a six-hole fife, a flutelike instrument. His wife, Dawn, strides along at the head of the group, and the couple's two sons, Ryder, 11, and Kelton, 7, carry flags as part of a color guard. Early Saturday, the family pulled on their Colonial-era costumes, and prepared for a long day. There were two parades to get to - one in Towson in the morning, and another in Annapolis in the evening.
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SPORTS
By Seattle Times | August 11, 1993
FIFE, Wash. -- Citing indifference to their efforts by the Washington State Racing Commission, backers of a Thoroughbred racetrack in Fife have abandoned their plans to build a $55-million facility in Pierce County.Dan Absher, spokesman for Fife Thoroughbred Racing Management, said his group also will abandon a lawsuit that sought to overturn the commission's decision to award racing dates to a group trying to build a track in Auburn, located south of Seattle. Fife is located east of Tacoma and southwest of Auburn.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2008
Pasadena Theatre Company, showing a good sense of timing or a little bit of luck, scheduled in the middle of an election season a musical chronicling the vote for independence by the Continental Congress in the summer of 1776. The theater group knew about the historical parallels between the 1969 Broadway opening when Americans were divided over the Vietnam War and the present political divisions over Iraq, but it is unlikely to have anticipated the wrangling in Congress over the financial crisis during this musical's opening week.
NEWS
June 15, 2007
Above, Peter Davies, town crier of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, practices his bell-ringing aboard the Bluenose II, docked at the Naval Academy. The replica of the schooner that won the first America's Cup completes its visit today and moves on for a two-day stopover in Baltimore. At left, members of the Musique 400 Troupe dance with visitors. Phil Roberts plays the fife.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menizie and By Karol V. Menizie,Sun Staff | August 13, 2000
When you think of a woodworking shop, you don't usually imagine a place where bird song outside is louder than the work going on inside. But such a place is Hubbard Cabinetmakers in Butler, where two cousins are building their future and a business on the furniture-making traditions of the past. One recent day, Fife Hubbard was soundlessly carving naturalistic details in the ball-and-claw foot of one leg of a small dressing table, while his cousin, Crawford Hubbard, carefully painted carpenter's glue on the "breadboard" ends of a trestle table top. At the back of the shop their co-worker Mike Clarkson was using a hand scraper to shape a chair leg. The only modern sound was a radio murmuring in the background.
FEATURES
October 16, 1994
The Grand Militia Muster at Historic St. Mary's City Oct. 22-23 brings 17th-century re-enactment units from all over the East Coast. The units, which include groups representing the English Civil War and the James Fort Militia, will show their skills in pike drill, crossbow, swordplay and camp cooking on Governor's Field.Admission is $6.50 for adults; $6 for seniors and students 13 to 18; $3.25 for ages 6 to 12. Historic St. Mary's City is on Route 5 in Southern Maryland. Call (301) 862-0990.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Staff Writer | July 28, 1993
Ten men wearing blue, Civil War short coats and smocks stood at attention by a cannon, atop a mountain in Elkridge that overlooks the Patapsco River Valley and the old B&O Railroad line.The men, however, were only 15-millimeters tall.And standing above, looking at the men with pride, was the 15-year-old Hanover resident who created them for the train exhibit at the B&O Railroad Station Museum in Ellicott City."It probably took me more time researching what the details of the uniforms were than the time it took me to paint it," said David O'Toole, a sophomore at Archbishop Spalding High School in Severn.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Staff Writer | July 28, 1993
Ten men wearing blue Civil War short coats and smocks stood at attention by a cannon, atop a mountain in Elkridge that overlooks the Patapsco River Valley and the old B&O Railroad line.But the men were only 15 millimeters tall.And standing above, looking at the men with pride, was the 15-year-old Hanover resident who created them for the train exhibit at the B&O Railroad Station Museum in Ellicott City."It probably took me more time researching what the details of the uniforms were than the time it took me to paint it," said David O'Toole, a sophomore at Archbishop Spalding High School in Severn.
NEWS
By Arizona Republic | December 16, 1991
PHOENIX -- Gov. Fife Symington yesterday denounced the federal government's planned lawsuit against him as "outrageous" and "typical of Washington run amok."The planned lawsuit by the U.S. Resolution Trust Corp. is not as severe as he had been led to expect, Mr. Symington said in an interview.Federal officials are planning to file a civil suit against Mr. Symington in U.S. District Court in Phoenix for his role as a former director and largest borrower in the downfall of Southwest Savings and Loan Association.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2007
J. Fife Symington Jr., who helped bring international air flights to Baltimore through Pan American World Airways and was a former ambassador to Trinidad and Tobago, died of old-age complications Sunday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Glyndon resident was 97. Mr. Symington worked to establish early commercial aviation routes and was among the first employees to open the Pan Am terminal at what is now the Dundalk Marine Terminal in 1937. Born in Baltimore, he was attracted to flying through an uncle, John Hambleton, a World War I flying ace who was a Pan American founder.
NEWS
June 15, 2007
Above, Peter Davies, town crier of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, practices his bell-ringing aboard the Bluenose II, docked at the Naval Academy. The replica of the schooner that won the first America's Cup completes its visit today and moves on for a two-day stopover in Baltimore. At left, members of the Musique 400 Troupe dance with visitors. Phil Roberts plays the fife.
NEWS
By SCOTT COLLINS and SCOTT COLLINS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 26, 2006
HOLLYWOOD -- Don Knotts, the saucer-eyed, scarecrow-thin comic actor best known for his roles as the high-strung, small-town deputy Barney Fife on the 1960s CBS series The Andy Griffith Show and the leisure-suit-clad landlord Ralph Furley on ABC's '70s sitcom Three's Company, has died. He was 81. Mr. Knotts, who lived in West Los Angeles, died Friday night of lung cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, according to Sherwin Bash, his longtime manager. Family members said that his longtime friend Mr. Griffith was one of his last visitors.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2005
Despite the cold, people stood outside the Ellicott City B&O Railroad Station Museum on Sunday, drawn by rolling snare drums and high-pitched fifes. The musicians, dressed in Civil War military uniforms, are members of a youth re-enactment group, the Patapsco Patriots. Director and principal musician Tim Ertel calls his troupe an "eccentric" version of the Boy Scouts. Not only do they learn music, the boys also pick up on American history, volunteer and camp on battlefields. The Patapsco Patriots Fife and Drum Corps will appear at Fort McHenry on Saturday and Sunday for a Civil War living-history weekend.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2002
ATLANTA -- Dane Fife's video inspiration is the basketball classic Hoosiers. His role is defensive stopper. And his method of locker room madness is designed to release his own tension as much as anyone else's. For the past three games of the NCAA tournament, Indiana's senior has been the equalizer for the Hoosiers. In a span of 10 giddy days, Fife has effectively shut down three of the tournament's best shooting guards. Next up: Maryland All-American Juan Dixon. It's a matchup that could go a long way toward determining tonight's NCAA championship game at the Georgia Dome.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen, Ken Murray and Christian Ewell and Paul McMullen, Ken Murray and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2002
ATLANTA -- He averaged more playing time two seasons ago, when he walked on from the football team and was used by Gary Williams to light a fire under Danny Miller. Calvin McCall hasn't played more than seven minutes in a game in 2001-02 and Maryland will welcome a top recruiting class, but McCall hopes to have a bigger role in next season's rotation. "It's tough getting minutes with Juan [Dixon] out there," McCall said yesterday. "Right now, I'm just thinking about winning a national championship.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 26, 1993
Of course the wonderful thing about "Strictly Ballroom," opening today at the Senator Theatre, is that it's not strictly ballroom. It's strictly everything.It's one of those wondrous fables that seems to bore in so intensely on such a small subject that you only notice upon reflection the scale of its ambition. At the time you hardly notice it, because you're having such a good time.It might be seen as the vivid, comic dramatization of a truth uttered about academic life but applicable to any intensely factional human enterprise: The fights are so bitter because the stakes are so small.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen, Ken Murray and Christian Ewell and Paul McMullen, Ken Murray and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2002
ATLANTA -- He averaged more playing time two seasons ago, when he walked on from the football team and was used by Gary Williams to light a fire under Danny Miller. Calvin McCall hasn't played more than seven minutes in a game in 2001-02 and Maryland will welcome a top recruiting class, but McCall hopes to have a bigger role in next season's rotation. "It's tough getting minutes with Juan [Dixon] out there," McCall said yesterday. "Right now, I'm just thinking about winning a national championship.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menizie and By Karol V. Menizie,Sun Staff | August 13, 2000
When you think of a woodworking shop, you don't usually imagine a place where bird song outside is louder than the work going on inside. But such a place is Hubbard Cabinetmakers in Butler, where two cousins are building their future and a business on the furniture-making traditions of the past. One recent day, Fife Hubbard was soundlessly carving naturalistic details in the ball-and-claw foot of one leg of a small dressing table, while his cousin, Crawford Hubbard, carefully painted carpenter's glue on the "breadboard" ends of a trestle table top. At the back of the shop their co-worker Mike Clarkson was using a hand scraper to shape a chair leg. The only modern sound was a radio murmuring in the background.
NEWS
By Erika Peterman and Erika Peterman,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
Imagine that you are 12 years old, marching on a Civil War battlefield with the sound of gunfire exploding around you. Too young to carry a weapon, you have been chosen instead to play a fife or a drum to help communicate commands to the soldiers.But that's not all. You might have to haul firewood and water and guard the soldiers' tents. You might also be ordered to tend to the wounded or even bury the dead.Though the Patapsco Guard Fife and Drum Corps - a group of about 10 boys ages 11 to 16 - only re-creates these scenes with other Civil War re-enactors, its members get a realistic look at what many boys their age faced during the War Between the States.
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