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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | June 27, 1992
Baltimore apparently will lose out on its bid to be the site of the one of the world's biggest sports conventions, the FIFA Congress, because Washington isn't expected to hold the opening game of the 1994 World Cup soccer tournament.FIFA is soccer's international governing body and historically holds its biennial congress in conjunction with the opening game. The U.S. organizing committee for the World Cup has announced it will recommend that the opening game of the 24-nation tournament be held at Soldier Field in Chicago.
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NEWS
By Duncan Hill | June 17, 2014
Like many fans and casual observers around the world, my life has been inundated with soccer (or fĂștbol) over the past few days. This is not a complaint; I really love watching the World Cup. Generally speaking, I have never been able to get excited about watching soccer, especially American Major League Soccer, because the matches usually consist of about 800 completed passes and 0 goals. However, the World Cup is different; it's that special time every four years that we get to see some of the best athletes from around the globe compete for a gold trophy that they get to borrow until the next cup (and yes, I believe soccer players are some of the best, if not the best, athletes)
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SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | June 27, 1994
It's never too early (or late) for a little jingoism, which means to be overly chauvinistic or patriotic to the extreme regarding anything and everything American.From the moment a few years back when the United States was handed the responsibility of being host to the World Cup, a feeling has existed that many of the competing nations did not want to see the 1994 tournament go off well.No doubt the first six of 10 reasons why this country got the nod from the game's governing body, FIFA, had to do with money, television exposure, commercial considerations, sponsorships, advertising and, oh yes, money.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Derek Woodward can remember how local sports fans reacted to the 1994 World Cup, the first and only time the quadrennial soccer event was held in the United States. Despite games being played as nearby as Washington's RFK Stadium, few casual fans knew what was going on. But Woodward, a teacher and girls soccer coach at Kenwood High in Baltimore County, has seen local interest in the World Cup grow dramatically over the past 20 years. When Woodward organized a watch party at the Gunpowder Lodge in Perry Hall for the U.S. team's tournament opener in 2010, nearly 500 people showed up. "Now you have people who are emotionally invested in the sport and they're telling me how [English star]
NEWS
By Duncan Hill | June 17, 2014
Like many fans and casual observers around the world, my life has been inundated with soccer (or fĂștbol) over the past few days. This is not a complaint; I really love watching the World Cup. Generally speaking, I have never been able to get excited about watching soccer, especially American Major League Soccer, because the matches usually consist of about 800 completed passes and 0 goals. However, the World Cup is different; it's that special time every four years that we get to see some of the best athletes from around the globe compete for a gold trophy that they get to borrow until the next cup (and yes, I believe soccer players are some of the best, if not the best, athletes)
SPORTS
By Gary Davidson and Gary Davidson,Special to The Sun | October 30, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The organizing committee charged with attracting World Cup 1994 soccer games to the region put its best foot forward yesterday, apparently impressing an international inspection delegation with a whirlwind tour of the District of Columbia.Without significantly contributing to the proceedings, Baltimore seemingly moved a step closer to becoming the host of the weeklong Federation Internationale de Football Association Congress that precedes the June 17-July 17, 1994, tournament.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff and news services | August 21, 2009
Thirteen more stadiums have been dropped from consideration for the U.S. bid to host soccer's World Cup in 2018 or 2022, leaving 32 under consideration, including Baltimore's M&T Bank Stadium. Failing to make the cut Thursday were Legion Field in Birmingham, Ala.; Paul Brown Stadium in Cincinnati; Ohio Stadium in Columbus; Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville, Ark.; Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, Tenn.; the planned Sports City USA venue in Las Vegas; the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome and TCF Bank Stadium in Minneapolis; the Superdome in New Orleans; Heinz Field in Pittsburgh; Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City; the Alamodome in San Antonio; and Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Ariz.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | October 28, 1994
With the World Cup field expanding from 24 teams to 32 teams, FIFA yesterday increased the number of berths for Africa from the three that took part in the United States this past summer to five for the 1998 tournament in France.FIFA, soccer's world governing body, also increased by one entry the berths of four of the other five confederations and maintained the number for Oceania, which still must earn a spot by a playoff against a country from another continent.Besides the three spots for the North and Central American region and the five for Africa, Europe has 15 spots, including one for France as host nation; Asia has 3, plus a possible playoff winner with Oceania.
TRAVEL
By NEW YORK TIMES | November 27, 2005
FIFA, the international governing body for soccer, releases its last batch of 300,000 World Cup 2006 tickets on Dec. 12, offering a final chance to buy tickets to the games, held June 9 through July 9 in stadiums all over Germany. The opening game will be in Munich's new Allianz Arena, while the final - won by Brazil in Japan in 2002 - will be in Berlin's Olympic Stadium. Among the 12 cities with early matches are Frankfurt, Hamburg and Leipzig. The FIFA World Cup Ticketing Center in Frankfurt will process applications for tickets to all 64 matches; the prices range from as low as 35 euros ($41.
SPORTS
By Gary Davidson and Gary Davidson,Special to The Sun | August 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- If Jack Kent Cooke gets his stadium, Washington gets the World Cup final -- that is the formula District of Columbia Cup organizers are following.But Baltimore might not want to cheer Washington's bid for the title game.Cooke, owner of the Washington Redskins, is planning to build a new, 78,600-seat stadium for his NFL team. At that capacity, Washington could qualify for the world's soccer championship game, something that RFK Stadium -- which would hold 60,000 for the game -- probably couldn't do.If RFK Stadium were used in the proposal for games, the World Cup Washington Region bid committee will not seek the title contest, committee chairman John Koskinen said last week.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Likely sensing that uproar over Russia's anti-gay law isn't going away, FIFA says it has asked Russia for "clarification and more details" about the country's law ahead of the 2018 World Cup being held there, the Associated Press reports . Smart move, given how the International Olympic Committee has yet to receive a definitive answer from Russian officials about how the law will be enforced at the Sochi Winter Olympics in February. In a statement, FIFA says it has "zero tolerance against discrimination.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | March 21, 2012
"FIFA Street" Developer: EA Canada Platform: Xbox 360, Playstation 3 Score: 9/10 It is not surprising that "FIFA Street" is a great game, given its parentage. "FIFA 12" is the highest achievement so far in EA's quest to rule the world's game, and "Street" has inherited the core DNA and formula for enjoyment that makes even non-soccer fans recognize "FIFA 12" as a great gaming experience. In the mid-'00s, the "FIFA Street" series existed not as an offshoot of the main 11-on-11 game but as a standalone, "NBA Jam"-style game that you had to like soccer to enjoy.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff and news services | August 21, 2009
Thirteen more stadiums have been dropped from consideration for the U.S. bid to host soccer's World Cup in 2018 or 2022, leaving 32 under consideration, including Baltimore's M&T Bank Stadium. Failing to make the cut Thursday were Legion Field in Birmingham, Ala.; Paul Brown Stadium in Cincinnati; Ohio Stadium in Columbus; Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville, Ark.; Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, Tenn.; the planned Sports City USA venue in Las Vegas; the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome and TCF Bank Stadium in Minneapolis; the Superdome in New Orleans; Heinz Field in Pittsburgh; Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City; the Alamodome in San Antonio; and Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Ariz.
TRAVEL
By NEW YORK TIMES | November 27, 2005
FIFA, the international governing body for soccer, releases its last batch of 300,000 World Cup 2006 tickets on Dec. 12, offering a final chance to buy tickets to the games, held June 9 through July 9 in stadiums all over Germany. The opening game will be in Munich's new Allianz Arena, while the final - won by Brazil in Japan in 2002 - will be in Berlin's Olympic Stadium. Among the 12 cities with early matches are Frankfurt, Hamburg and Leipzig. The FIFA World Cup Ticketing Center in Frankfurt will process applications for tickets to all 64 matches; the prices range from as low as 35 euros ($41.
SPORTS
By Grahame L. Jones and Grahame L. Jones,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 22, 2004
HERAKLION, Greece - In a game of many missed chances last night, Mohammed Emad and Sepp Blatter didn't miss theirs. Emad jumped and, with a bicycle kick, knocked Australia out of the men's Olympic tournament and put his country, Iraq, into the semifinals against Paraguay with a 1-0 win in front of 10,023 at Pankritio Stadium. Blatter, too, was forced into some acrobatics - the verbal variety - by a question from Jamie Jackson of England's Observer newspaper, though Blatter's answer wasn't quite as deft as Emad's move.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | July 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - A rainstorm of biblical proportions had turned the soccer field at RFK Stadium into a slippery stew of mud Wednesday evening. The treacherous conditions did little to stop Washington Freedom scoring stars Mia Hamm and Abby Wambach from tackling any nearby Philadelphia Charge player, or from dribbling like madwomen through double teams, knee ligaments be damned. In the slop, even with a sore knee, a midfielder as skilled and hungry as Hamm can't be knocked off her shark-attack mentality to drive to the net. What a sight.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | March 22, 1992
John Koskinen, chairman of the Washington-area bid committee, is on edge. He didn't expect to be. But he is. Thefeeling won't be assuaged until tomorrow, when game sites are announced for the 1994 World Cup."Historically, I've been very bullish on our being picked," said Koskinen, who was co-owner of the Maryland Bays of the American Professional Soccer League until they folded this winter."We're the nation's capital," he said. "All the embassies are here and we've met all the requirements.
SPORTS
By Grahame L. Jones and Grahame L. Jones,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 22, 2004
HERAKLION, Greece - In a game of many missed chances last night, Mohammed Emad and Sepp Blatter didn't miss theirs. Emad jumped and, with a bicycle kick, knocked Australia out of the men's Olympic tournament and put his country, Iraq, into the semifinals against Paraguay with a 1-0 win in front of 10,023 at Pankritio Stadium. Blatter, too, was forced into some acrobatics - the verbal variety - by a question from Jamie Jackson of England's Observer newspaper, though Blatter's answer wasn't quite as deft as Emad's move.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis | February 25, 2002
INSPIRED BY the International Olympic Committee's evenhanded resolution of the Salt Lake City figure skating controversy - giving gold medals to both the Russians and Canadians - other sports authorities are acting to set straight some long-smoldering debates. To wit: Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig announced he will award the Brooklyn Dodgers the 1951 National League pennant. The reason: recent revelations that the New York Giants were stealing signs and that Bobby Thomson may have been tipped off about the Ralph Branca pitch on which he homered for the Shot Heard 'Round the World.
SPORTS
March 21, 2001
Pro football XFL's Week 7 rating is lowest in history for a `Big 3' network The XFL has hit a new low for prime-time programming. The national rating for the league's Week 7 broadcast on joint owner NBC was a 1.6, which is believed to be the lowest prime-time night among the big three networks in Nielsen Media Research history. It's also well below the worst previous evening sports broadcast on NBC, ABC or CBS. That dubious distinction had been held by Game 3 of last season's Stanley Cup Finals, which drew a 2.3 on ABC. Ratings are the percentage of U.S. television homes tuning in. ARENA FOOTBALL LEAGUE: Running back Lawrence Phillips, who signed with the Florida Bobcats on March 13, left the team over the weekend without telling anyone.
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