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NEWS
September 2, 2011
It is all about money. Years ago, Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. under Constellation Energy Group cut their field workforce to as few humans as possible and then subcontracted much of their field work to electrical contractors. Any county government executive complaining to the legislature might as well be talking to the wall. The utilities have their lobbyist who with campaign contributions have no fear of any legislative action. BGE/Constellation top management are only interested in how big their payday is going to be when the merger takes place with Exelon Corp.
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NEWS
September 2, 2011
It is all about money. Years ago, Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. under Constellation Energy Group cut their field workforce to as few humans as possible and then subcontracted much of their field work to electrical contractors. Any county government executive complaining to the legislature might as well be talking to the wall. The utilities have their lobbyist who with campaign contributions have no fear of any legislative action. BGE/Constellation top management are only interested in how big their payday is going to be when the merger takes place with Exelon Corp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2011
Matthew "Mat" Azola, who had overseen historic restorations and construction projects for Azola Cos., died Tuesday night in his Ramona, Calif., home from complications of a black widow spider bite. He was 34. Mr. Azola, the son of Martin "Marty" and Lone Azola, was born in Baltimore and raised in historic Rockland, the 19th-century Falls Road mill community that had been restored by his father and grandfather in the 1970s. After graduating from Towson High School in 1995, he attended Towson University for a year before entering the family business.
FEATURES
April 18, 1996
TV anchor does a little field workIt's about time Harry Smith put in an honest day's work.The co-anchor of "CBS This Morning," who may be leaving the show soon, spent yesterday helping tend the grounds at Oriole Park at Camden Yards for one of his "Hey Harry, Do My Job" segments.Mr. Smith, whose previous jobs-for-a-day have included minister, dairy farmerand blue-crab fisherman, started his workday at 8: 30 a.m. as a part of groundskeeper Paul Zwaska's crew. His duties included mowing the grass, chalking the field and raking the dirt to remove rocks.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 1, 2004
An expert in African art who has lived on that continent and studied how its leaders have used the arts to promote political and economic agendas has been hired as the Baltimore Museum of Art's curator of African art. Karen Milbourne, an assistant professor of African art history at the University of Kentucky who has organized exhibitions on the healing powers of African art and on the political aspects of African-art studies, will step into her new...
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | June 29, 1997
25 years ago Rain and more rain fell as Hurricane Agnes moved through, halting all field work after Tuesday and leaving soggy fields that will delay resumption of work for several more days, according to the Maryland-Delaware Crop Reporting Service. It is too early to fully assess the effects of the storm. Flooding along larger streams and rivers severely damaged or wiped out some crops. -- The Carroll Record, June 29, 1972.50 years ago With the beginning of Governor Lane's new fiscal program, Carroll County will start to receive $531,108 in additional state revenues annually for the cooperation of its government functions and relief of taxation at the local level.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 30, 2008
Gwyneth J. Spangler, who despite being diagnosed with cystic fibrosis when she was 18 months old went onto become a successful athlete and outdoorswoman while working as a hydrogeologist, died of pulmonary failure Thursday at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Falls Church, Va. The Catonsville resident was 38. Gwyneth Jones was born in Baltimore and raised on West Seminary Avenue in Lutherville. At Towson High School, she was a member of the track team, which made the state finals one year, and also participated in the old Lady Equitable race in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 5, 2011
Matthew "Mat" Azola, who had overseen historic restorations and construction projects for Azola Cos., died Tuesday night in his Ramona, Calif., home from complications of a black widow spider bite. He was 34. Mr. Azola, the son of Martin "Marty" and Lone Azola, was born in Baltimore and raised in historic Rockland, the 19th-century Falls Road mill community that had been restored by his father and grandfather in the 1970s. After graduating from Towson High School in 1995, he attended Towson University for a year before entering the family business.
FEATURES
By Jerdine Nolen | May 20, 1998
Editor's note: A Baltimore author writes about a child who ventures out in the middle of the night to see how Harvey Potter grows his wonderful balloons.Harvey Potter was a very strange fellow indeed. He was a farmer, but he didn't farm like my daddy did. He farmed a genuine, U.S. Government Inspected Balloon Farm.No one knew exactly how he did it. Some folks say that it wasn't real - that it was magic. But I know what I saw, and those were real, actual balloons growing out of the plain ole ground!
SPORTS
March 26, 2011
Patriot delights in the scent of live people. Justice prefers them dead. And Blu goes bonkers at the smell of trout. In a world filled with a cornucopia of odors, each of the seven dogs of the Natural Resources Police K-9 force finds something that sets its nose twitching. These dogs track bad guys and lost kids, drowning victims and wandering Alzheimer patients, illegally taken wildlife and illicit guns. They tell humans to look here instead of there, saving precious time in situations where often every moment counts.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller | nicole.fuller@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 11, 2010
One of the groups organizing a petition drive with the ultimate aim of preventing slots at an Anne Arundel County mall is paying a private firm to help gather the 19,000 signatures required for a ballot referendum. The Maryland Jockey Club recently hired FieldWorks, a Washington-based group, to organize its effort for a referendum on the casino site, said Tom Chuckas, president of the Jockey Club, which operates Laurel Park racetrack. Chuckas declined to say how much his group is paying FieldWorks, adding that the amount is still being determined.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporter | May 30, 2008
The Anne Arundel County Council ordered an audit yesterday of a contract worth as much as $11 million to install artificial turf at school athletic fields that was awarded to a company with political ties but no experience in such projects. Council members, who also froze the funding for the project in the annual budget that they approved yesterday, declined to say why they want the contract reviewed. But their 6-0 vote came after one councilman questioned the transparency of the bidding process, and two subcontractors no longer involved in the deal raised questions about Sunny Acres Landscaping's winning bid. The owner of a Georgia-based turf provider, whom Sunny Acres cut ties with, said key aspects of the project have changed since the county signed the contract.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 30, 2008
Gwyneth J. Spangler, who despite being diagnosed with cystic fibrosis when she was 18 months old went onto become a successful athlete and outdoorswoman while working as a hydrogeologist, died of pulmonary failure Thursday at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Falls Church, Va. The Catonsville resident was 38. Gwyneth Jones was born in Baltimore and raised on West Seminary Avenue in Lutherville. At Towson High School, she was a member of the track team, which made the state finals one year, and also participated in the old Lady Equitable race in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | August 14, 2006
It's hard work, picking beans, but many Polish immigrants felt that they didn't have a choice during the Depression years. Money was tight, jobs were scarce, families were large and discrimination was rampant. So come summertime, mothers would head out from Baltimore to farmland in Pennsylvania and Maryland with their children in tow. Some of the women skinned tomatoes or husked corn, but mostly, families with children as young as 5 worked side by side picking beans. They would work six days a week, heading out when the sky was dark and the fields wet with dew. If they were lucky, they made 2 cents a pound (some remember a half penny or 1 penny a pound)
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 1, 2004
An expert in African art who has lived on that continent and studied how its leaders have used the arts to promote political and economic agendas has been hired as the Baltimore Museum of Art's curator of African art. Karen Milbourne, an assistant professor of African art history at the University of Kentucky who has organized exhibitions on the healing powers of African art and on the political aspects of African-art studies, will step into her new...
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2002
Ask one and then the other about her favorite food and you'll get the same answer: Dad's steak on the grill. For Jacque and Brandi Sutphin, identical twins and senior standouts on the No. 2-ranked South River girls soccer team, that one is easy. Dig even further and it's still the same: Medium rare and most of the time without steak sauce, but on occasion they'll reach for a little A-1. "And if one is having A-1, the other is having A-1," said Brandi, who, along with her sister, insists - from favorite music to television shows to subjects in school to Dad's work on the barbecue - there's very little difference between the two. That is until they take the soccer field.
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