Advertisement
HomeCollectionsField Of Dreams
IN THE NEWS

Field Of Dreams

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 18, 2002
ABERDEEN'S first family of baseball has truly given its hometown a field of dreams. When the elegant new 5,557-seat Ripken Stadium opens tonight, it will join such minor-league shrines as Norfolk's Harbor Park and Indianapolis' Victory Field as must-see destinations for fans' pilgrimages. Among minor-league baseball's 176 teams, some may have catchier names than the Aberdeen IronBirds. Some examples: the Batavia Muckdogs, Hickory Crawdads, Kannapolis Intimidators, Rancho Cucamonga Quakes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
Date: June 22, 2013 Her story: Katherine Cox, 28, grew up in Baltimore. She is an exercise physiologist in the cardiac department at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital. Her mother, Donna Cox, works for the L. Warner Cos. Inc. in Timonium, and her father, David Cox, died in 2001. His story: Scott Smith, 28, also grew up in Baltimore. He is a senior workplace wellness program manager, or consultant, at CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield. His parents, Jane Smith and Sheridan Smith, are retired.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 4, 1991
A few pint-sized ball fields for a rookie baseball league sounds like a great idea. Exercise and all-American activity. Who could object? A gaggle of angry neighbors who say the fields will bring unwanted noise and traffic, drive down property values and generally ruin their retirements.Some background: Tom Brown, a former Washington Senator and Green Bay Packer who runs a sports program for 6-12-year-olds, wants to build four baseball fields (no lights), a flag-football field, concession stand, parking lot and small gymnasium on 7 1/2 acres west of Salisbury.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
The ball leaps off the bat, kicks up dust and bounds toward right field, a sure hit. Tom Coffin reckons not. The second baseman glides left, gloves the ball cleanly and throws the runner out. Coffin's teammates on the Colt .45s explode. "Woo-hoo!" "Way to go, Mr. Tom!" "You showboat, you!" Why the fuss? Coffin, a great-grandfather, is 73. It's Sunday morning in Dundalk and, on the American Legion baseball field, geezers like Coffin are feeling their oats. Once a week, nearly 150 players - from middle-aged men who still cherish the game to 70-somethings who inspire the rest - compete in the 10-team Eastern Baltimore County Over 40 Baseball League.
NEWS
By Maureen McNeill and Maureen McNeill,Special to The Sun | April 12, 1991
SALISBURY -- It looks as if Tom Brown will get to build his "Field of Dreams" after all.In a case that has pitted kids and baseball against people worried about lower property values, the Wicomico County Board of Zoning Appeals has given conditional approval to Mr. Brown's Rookie League park.Board Chairman J. Phillips Wright noted that the proposal drew more attention than any other he can remember. He said that the board had to base its decision on zoning, however, and not on neighbors' objections or the support of Rookie League fans.
NEWS
By Gary Lambrecht | April 19, 1992
The message was clear at Atholton High School last week.Baseballis back, and not even barbarians can hold up the game.Atholton has ushered in many an Easter break by celebrating the game of baseball with a well-run, two-day tournament. This year's tournament, which ended Wednesday with Mount Hebron defeating Atholton ina tense, extra-inning affair, was doubly significant.It marked the first tournament in Atholton's charming, new baseball facility, which includes two dugouts, a press box and a re-painted, electronic scoreboard.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | April 8, 1991
Just last week Dave Walsh was on the job at the Orioles' new downtown ballpark, building the tunnel that will connect the visitors' dugout and clubhouse, thinking about what it all will mean."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 24, 1991
SALISBURY -- Take a script worthy of Hollywood: A forme big-league ballplayer spends years building from scratch a sports program for a bunch of cute, All-American kids and finally scrapes together the money to build four child-sized diamonds in a sorghum field.Then add a strong dose of reality: Angry neighbors say the fields will bring unwanted noise and traffic, devalue their properties and ruin their retirements.Call it "Field of Dreams II." To adapt a line from the movie: Propose to build it and they will come -- to zoning hearings.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Evening Sun Staff | September 18, 1990
A CAR FROM West Virginia pulls out of the gravel parking lot. Soon it is replaced by a van from New York. Out of it spills a bunch of youngsters, headed for the clearing beyond the corn.There is no admission charge; no waiting to see the main attraction. You see it, in fact, as soon as you make the last turn onto the lane that winds down a bit, then crosses a creek. Here the cornfield gives way to a baseball diamond.It is just the way Hollywood left it a couple of years ago. It is just the way the fictional Ray Kinsella envisioned it when he plowed under his corn crop and mortgaged his life for a dream.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | September 29, 1991
For $20, the Baltimore Orioles let fans wear an official jersey of a favorite player and have their pictures taken on the field yesterday. But to many of the 100 or so people who turned out for the charity fund-raiser, it was worth $20 just to walk out on the field at Memorial Stadium."
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 6, 2011
Ravens linebacker and future action hero Ray Lewis has done it again, making another hilarious cameo in a fake movie trailer for Funny or Die. Lewis appeared with Drew Brees in a Pepsi Maxx commercial, fending off a serial-killing Pepsi bottle, on the sometimes unsafe-for-work website FunnyorDie.com back in February. This time, Lewis was one of a handful of NFL players -- including Tony Gonzalez, Shawne Merriman, DeSean Jackson and Dwight Freeney -- with lines in the lockout-spoofing trailer for “Field of Dreams 2.” With the NFL lockout shutting down the NFL season, “Twilight” actor Taylor Lautner heard voices in his head that asked him to build a football field in the middle of his Iowa farm.
NEWS
August 9, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS History lessons A considered look at baseball's past suggests that the game was never really played in Heaven, that even the Babe was villified in his day, and that Barry Bonds' name will outlast today's passing brickbats. Sports baltimoresun.com/steele Broadband boasting Cable and telephone companies are in a ferocious battle for broadband Internet market share, and they're all bragging about how fast they are. Unfortunately, they're usually exaggerating.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2005
When the poet Rudyard Kipling defined a man as one who keeps his head while all others around him are losing theirs, he could have been describing a clutch hitter - the Cal Ripken or Derek Jeter who tunes out the frenzy of a late-inning crowd, takes a nice, steady swing, and lines a game-winning single up the middle. Or he might have been describing the sort of baseball people who rarely draw the fan adoration of a Ripken or a Jeter, let alone the allusions of poets. Tonight, when big league baseball finally returns to Washington after a 33-season absence, the game won't just be the coming-out party for slugger Brad Wilkerson or manager and Hall of Famer Frank Robinson.
TRAVEL
By Linley Wartenberg and Linley Wartenberg,Special to the Sun | April 3, 2005
More than 15 years after Ray Kinsella built it, people still come to the Field of Dreams. Just like Shoeless Joe Jackson, throngs of baseball fans -- 65,000 a year -- are drawn to Dyersville, Iowa, to see the ballpark Kevin Costner's character built in a cornfield in the 1989 movie Field of Dreams. The field reopened for the season April 1, two days before this year's first major league baseball game. But while the famous cornfield is by far the town's biggest attraction, there are many other things to do and see here.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2004
On the hallowed turf where Johnny Unitas passed his way into the Hall of Fame and the Orioles played their way into the World Series, where a future governor watched baseball with his dad and a mayor-to-be courted his future wife, a crowd gathered yesterday to witness what they called the new Miracle on 33rd Street. City and state officials and leaders of nonprofit, religious and community groups came together to dedicate the first pieces of Stadium Place, a $50 million development with senior housing and a YMCA on the site of the old Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
By Sarah Merkey and Sarah Merkey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 4, 2004
This summer is the last that Lou Hause of Glen Arm will put on his Brewers baseball uniform and join his over-40 teammates for leisurely league play in Churchville each Sunday. His retirement is understandable - there comes a time when even the most dedicated players decide it's time to hang up their gear. At 75, Hause is the oldest member of the team, which also has two of his sons, Mike Hause, 48, of Perryville and Steven Hause, 44, of Pasadena, on the roster. Hause is also the oldest participant in the six-team-league that was formed 10 years ago. Hause joined the league a year after it was formed at the urging of son Mike, a technician for Ryder Truck Rental.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lasson | March 11, 1992
EVEN WITH its admirable attention to architectural authenticity, Oriole Park at Camden Yards -- which I suspect will be called "the new stadium" by most natives of this generation -- is not yet a local landmark. A tour of the stadium may evoke a flash of memories more than a flood of enthusiasm for the modern-day business of baseball.It made me remember my first visit to Memorial Stadium in the early '50s to see the old Orioles play a night game. How different that bright emerald diamond from my field of dreams while listening to Chuck Thompson describe the games on radio!
NEWS
By Tom Flynn and Tom Flynn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 17, 2003
There's a small, uneven field of grass and bare dirt on the grounds of Ellicott City's Town and Country Apartments that bears little resemblance to the many level soccer fields that dot Howard County. Yet a soccer field is just what it becomes each summer evening when a group of predominantly Hispanic players descends upon it for a nightly match. That humble patch provides a space for regular, free-wheeling play uncharacteristic of the thousands of youth players in organized leagues and clubs that dominate the sport in this soccer-loving county.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | July 6, 2002
Sadly, the Splendid Splinter has left us too soon. He's gone off to Ebbets Field, the Polo Grounds or some other version of baseball heaven where undoubtedly he'll get a warm welcome and probably some razzing too from such as the Flying Dutchman, the Georgia Peach and - without question - the Sultan of Swat himself. Probably, they'll greet The Kid with a pick-up game, a dream inter-generational All-Star Game. Teddy Ballgame might find himself playing left field behind the Rajah, the man he regarded as the best hitter ever.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.