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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1998
Corn stands as tall as eight feet across Maryland farmlands, growing into what promises to be a bumper crop.That's good news for consumers, hungry for one of Maryland's favorite summer side dishes.But it might be bad news for farmers, who might be unable to cash in on their golden fields."We are looking at a great crop but drastic prices," said Kelly Hereth, executive director of the Carroll County Farm Service Agency.Maryland corn usually hits its peak in August, and consumer demand appears to be high for sweeter varieties that keep their flavor longer -- one reason local groceries and roadside stands are stocking more corn.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2000
"This could be my best crop ever," Joe Mullhausen said yesterday morning as he disappeared into a thicket of dark green corn stalks towering 10 feet, maybe 12 feet, above the ground. Mullhausen, 70, a stocky, white-haired farmer, planted 130 acres of field corn this year at his home farm near Prospect and on rented land in northeastern Harford County. He said the ears are longer, thicker and the kernels are deeper. "I doubt that I will live long enough to see a better crop than this," he said.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2000
"This could be my best crop ever," Joe Mullhausen said yesterday morning as he disappeared into a thicket of dark green corn stalks towering 10 feet, maybe 12 feet, above the ground. Mullhausen, 70, a stocky, white-haired farmer, planted 130 acres of field corn this year at his home farm near Prospect and on rented land in northeastern Harford County. He said the ears are longer, thicker and the kernels are deeper. "I doubt that I will live long enough to see a better crop than this," he said.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1999
The drought of 1999 is officially over, but the damage continues for Maryland farmers in the middle of harvesting a meager field corn crop for which the rains of August and September came too late.In some cases, the rain has brought more headaches, such as flattened crops and fields too wet to withstand heavy harvesting equipment."In plain words, it's a real mess," said Joe Mullhausen, a northern Harford County farmer near Whiteford.Mullhausen found parts of his cornfields flattened by Hurricane Floyd.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | December 20, 1992
Rainy weather and soggy fields have combined to delay harvesting what may be among the biggest corn crops of the past two decades.Despite the delayed harvest and the prospect that some grain may rot in the fields, Perryman farmer Brownie Pearce said the yield per acre of his corn crop is the second largest in 20 years.More than half of Mr. Pearce's 1,900-acre farm was planted in corn this year. About 110 acres of corn remain to be harvested. Mr. Pearce said the yield is 135 bushels per acre -- 28 more bushels per acre than last year's drought-devastated crop.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1999
The drought of 1999 is officially over, but the damage continues for Maryland farmers in the middle of harvesting a meager field corn crop for which the rains of August and September came too late.In some cases, the rain has brought more headaches, such as flattened crops and fields too wet to withstand heavy harvesting equipment."In plain words, it's a real mess," said Joe Mullhausen, a northern Harford County farmer near Whiteford.Mullhausen found parts of his cornfields flattened by Hurricane Floyd.
FEATURES
By Copley News Service | July 14, 1991
Corn on the cob is available almost the year round, but there's no doubt that it's best during the season that practically is synonymous with fresh corn -- summer.Not all corn is table-ready. Basically, there are several classifications, including popcorn, field corn, ornamental corn and sweet corn. Popcorn kernels burst open when exposed to heat. Field corn is used for animal feed or dried for hominy. It also is ground to make masa harina, which is used for corn tortillas and tamales. Ornamental is the multicolored dried corn that is used in decorations.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POLENTA AND GRITS? and ERICA MARCUS WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POLENTA AND GRITS?,NEWSDAY | May 17, 2006
Polenta and grits are both made by cooking dried, ground corn with water to achieve a porridge. The difference between them lies in how the corn is processed and ground. Corn is a grain native to the Americas, and it didn't arrive in Europe until Columbus brought it back upon his return to Spain. Europeans came to appreciate field corn, a starchier variety that is ground into cornmeal and used as animal feed. Northern Italians took to it and used the meal in the grain porridge called polenta that had been eaten since Roman times.
NEWS
April 28, 1991
The Carroll Soil Conservation District Board members have congratulated Bill Buchman for his dedication to soil conservation and water quality.Bill Buchman and his wife own and operate a vegetable and grain farm on Coon Club Road here.Bill also manages eight greenhouses and about 600 acres, in whichhe grows pumpkins, sweet corn, field corn and soybeans.About 35 percent of Bill's rented fields have been contoured by the Carroll Soil Conservation District, and nearly all row crops are planted using no-till.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | October 26, 2003
Sweet corn is great, but it can't hold a candle to the beautiful ornamental corn of fall. Marbled crimson and cream, slate blue, Burgundy, butter yellow swirled with russet, purple, blood red and more, ornamental corn is like a Fauvist painting on a cob. While today we use it primarily for decoration, ornamental corn, also known as Indian corn or field corn, is one of the "three sisters" (corn, beans and squash) that have been Native American diet staples for millenniums. Massasoit brought deerskin bags of popped corn to the first Thanksgiving.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1998
Corn stands as tall as eight feet across Maryland farmlands, growing into what promises to be a bumper crop.That's good news for consumers, hungry for one of Maryland's favorite summer side dishes.But it might be bad news for farmers, who might be unable to cash in on their golden fields."We are looking at a great crop but drastic prices," said Kelly Hereth, executive director of the Carroll County Farm Service Agency.Maryland corn usually hits its peak in August, and consumer demand appears to be high for sweeter varieties that keep their flavor longer -- one reason local groceries and roadside stands are stocking more corn.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | December 20, 1992
Rainy weather and soggy fields have combined to delay harvesting what may be among the biggest corn crops of the past two decades.Despite the delayed harvest and the prospect that some grain may rot in the fields, Perryman farmer Brownie Pearce said the yield per acre of his corn crop is the second largest in 20 years.More than half of Mr. Pearce's 1,900-acre farm was planted in corn this year. About 110 acres of corn remain to be harvested. Mr. Pearce said the yield is 135 bushels per acre -- 28 more bushels per acre than last year's drought-devastated crop.
FEATURES
By Copley News Service | July 14, 1991
Corn on the cob is available almost the year round, but there's no doubt that it's best during the season that practically is synonymous with fresh corn -- summer.Not all corn is table-ready. Basically, there are several classifications, including popcorn, field corn, ornamental corn and sweet corn. Popcorn kernels burst open when exposed to heat. Field corn is used for animal feed or dried for hominy. It also is ground to make masa harina, which is used for corn tortillas and tamales. Ornamental is the multicolored dried corn that is used in decorations.
SPORTS
January 30, 2011
Joe Heldmann of Catonsville writes: I live where there is a large population of deer like many other areas. I also have five acres about 5 miles downstream from Paw Paw, W. Va. My question to you: Are there any programs to relocate deer? I actually feed them field corn because I have a small piece of woods behind my house and at times they roam around my yard. I enjoy watching them throughout the year. In my area of West Virginia there are not very many left and I rarely see one on my way back and forth.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1999
Farmers get spring fever, too."Everything is coming alive, all of nature, the trees, the grass," says Bobby Prigel Jr., a fourth-generation farmer in Baltimore County's Long Green Valley. The grass is a welcome arrival, because that's what his cows eat.In grain fields, the wheat and barley have awakened from their winter dormancy and soaked up the fertilizer that farmers spread last month. Wheat fields looked like sparse lawns a month ago. Now they are lush and the grain is almost knee-high.
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