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By Gregory P. Kane | January 25, 1993
CASTRO, THE BLACKS AND AFRICA. By Carlos Moore Center for Afro-American Studies, UCLA. 472 pages. $23.50.THE regime of Cuba's Fidel Castro has overseen the systematic FTC destruction of black self-help groups called the Sociedades de Color. It has suppressed Afro-Cuban religions; banned Afro hairstyles as counterrevolutionary; pursued a foreign policy in Africa motivated as much by white supremacy and paternalism as by altruism; and alienated sympathetic American blacks like former exiles Robert Williams and Eldridge Cleaver as well as diplomats from black African countries.
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SPORTS
By Steve Gould | April 11, 2012
By now, you've heard the news: The Miami Marlins on Tuesday suspended Ozzie Guillen for five games for telling Time magazine he loves and respects Cuban dictator Fidel Castro. I wrote earlier that while I find Guillen's remarks stupid and insensitive -- and completely understand why many people were offended by them -- I thought it was wrong to punish him for them. The Marlins decided to suspend Guillen anyway, and trying to appease the outrage felt by much of the Cuban-American portion of the team's fan base certainly had something to do with that.
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NEWS
By Peter A. Bowe | February 25, 2001
LAST MONTH, Cuban President Fidel Castro celebrated the 42nd anniversary of his revolution. Through 10 U.S. presidents over 40 years, the United States has maintained a tight embargo on trade and travel with his country. It's time to reassess our objectives for this relationship and how to achieve them. If we want to move Cuba toward democratic capitalism, as opposed to getting revenge against Mr. Castro for his 1960s property expropriations, then our interests are better served by ending the embargo.
SPORTS
April 9, 2012
Frankness is his charm Kevin Baxter Los Angeles Times Should Ozzie Guillen be punished for speaking his mind? No, not if the Marlins believe in free speech. However, South Florida has only a tenuous relationship with free speech — especially regarding Cuba. And Guillen, a former Marlins coach who has long maintained a home in South Florida, certainly knows that. Guillen's comments put the team in a tough spot at a time when it was opening the doors to a new $515 million home in the heart of Miami's Little Havana, the most rabidly anti-Castro piece of real estate on Earth.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | September 21, 1990
Miami -- THE CHAMPAGNE is on ice here. The Cuban community in exile is in no doubt that the aging Fidel Castro, erstwhile revolutionary guerrilla of the Sierra Maestra, scourge of John F. Kennedy, sower of discontent in the Andean peaks, tail-wagger of the Soviet Union and last surviving caudillo of Latin America, finally is in sight of his come-uppance.No man is an island, not even in the lush and potentially self-sufficient Caribbean. Mr. Castro cannot survive without a financial and political mentor and protector in Moscow.
NEWS
By Timothy Dwyer and Timothy Dwyer,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 6, 1992
CASTRO'S FINAL HOUR. Andres Oppenheimer. Simon & Schuster. 461 pages. $25. Each trip to Cuba is a journey to hopelessness. Every morning Cubans awake to the reality of no food, no fuel and no future. They are stuck on an island sinking under the weight of a collapsing economy and isolated from the rest of the world because of one man, Fidel Castro.Mr. Castro, who has ruled Cuba with an iron fist for 33 years, now finds himself without any friends in the world. The Soviet Union, which propped up Cuba with free oil and other raw materials, is gone.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Staff Writer | April 12, 1992
MIAMI -- For 26-year-old Lema Dukens, democracy in Haiti meant bathrooms were installed in his town outside Cap Haitien and he could go to school to learn to read and write."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Nick Madigan and Matthew Hay Brown and Nick Madigan,Sun reporters | February 20, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Fidel Castro, the revolutionary leader who brought communism to the Western Hemisphere, vexing U.S. policymakers for nearly a half- century, resigned yesterday as president of Cuba. "My wishes have always been to discharge my duties to my last breath," Castro, 81, wrote in a message published in the Communist Party daily Granma. But he said his failing health would not permit him to continue as Cuba's supreme leader: "It would be a betrayal to my conscience to accept a responsibility requiring more mobility and dedication than I am physically able to offer."
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1995
He is, according to one of his biographers, the Energizer Bunny of world politics.Fidel Castro, 69, still bearded and seemingly in robust health, moves right along, beating his drum for world socialism and the Cuban Revolution, and against the United States' economic embargo of his country.These are the themes that he will probably speak upon, and probably at great length, in New York during the festivities next ,, week marking the 50th anniversary of the United Nations.Mr. Castro has been Cuba's leader for almost 37 years and the enduring nemesis of the world's remaining superpower.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1998
NEXT TIME you're passing through Havana, stop by the Museo de la Alfabetizacion.There you'll see people in their 50s, 60s and 70s, some with grandchildren in tow, proudly finding the letters they wrote to Fidel Castro some 35 years ago.Permanently stored in the museum, the letters have a common message: I've learned to read, and here's the proof.More than 700,000 Cubans dispatched that message in the early 1960s. In one of the most remarkable literacy campaigns in history, cadres of literate Cubans took to the sugar fields and city streets of the island.
NEWS
October 26, 2011
I am happy to see that once again there are Americans raising their voices in protest. I know I'm not happy with the direction that our elected officials, the banking industry and the military-industrial complex are taking this country. Our third president, Thomas Jefferson, recognized the need for "a little rebellion every so often. " Critics of the people who are beginning to protest say they lack direction. But it seems to me that once groups of people emerge who are disenchanted enough to organize, leaders eventually will appear.
NEWS
August 16, 2011
I saw the point of the writer who complained about Leonard Pitts' rather frequent accusations of "racism," but to say that President Obama's policies are "socialistic, Marxist" ("No racism here Mr. Pitts " Readers Respond, Aug 11)? Give me a break. This is not Fidel Castro, people! Obama is so timidly middle-of-the-road I am always shocked when I hear people describe him as if he were some flaming radical. He seems to be pursuing the same policies as George Bush before him, a far as I can see. Even "Obamacare" is hardly universalized medicine.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 4, 2010
Nilo S. Faria, a retired Gilman School Spanish teacher and former political prisoner who was confined to Cuban prisons during the 1960s for his anti-Castro activities, died March 23 of complications from kidney disease at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. The longtime Reisterstown resident was 90. Born and raised in Santa Clara, Cuba, Dr. Faria was the son of a real estate salesman and a homemaker. His father sent him to Baltimore, where he graduated in 1938 from Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | April 8, 2009
Franken's lead in Minn. Senate race grows ST. PAUL, Minn.: Democrat Al Franken increased his small lead over Republican Norm Coleman on Tuesday in the protracted dispute over Minnesota's Senate race, but it remains unclear when the five-month legal battle will end. A state court ordered more than 300 absentee ballots that had previously been excluded to be counted Tuesday, and the results increased Franken's lead from 225 votes to 312. Lawyers representing Coleman,...
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | March 4, 2008
At some point in this presidential campaign, we may have a real debate on foreign policy differences between the parties. That hasn't yet happened. The candidates have sparred about experience. They have clashed on Iraq. But they're still dancing around the most central question: How do you balance force and diplomacy when trying to keep America safe? Nothing illustrates the need for clarity more than the jousting over whether America should talk directly to the likes of Ra?l Castro or Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 26, 2008
Fidel Castro is stepping down? As Dorothy Parker said upon hearing of the death of President Calvin Coolidge, how can you tell? The bearded one lost most of his relevancy for us "yanquis" long ago. He once loomed large in the lives of baby boomers as we crouched under our desks in "duck-and-cover" drills, terrified of his nuclear-tipped Russian missiles. To today's youths, Mr. Castro is so last century. Even in Miami and Havana, the response to Mr. Castro's retirement is reported to be remarkably ho-hum.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 15, 1996
VATICAN CITY -- They are both septuagenarians in the autumn of their reigns, Pope John Paul II and Cuban President Fidel Castro. One helped topple communism in his native Poland, the other has vowed to redeem it in Cuba. Now, after nearly two decades of studiously avoiding and sometimes criticizing each other, il papa and el comandante are carefully edging toward a summit in Rome this week.Vatican officials say they are not interested in a mere photo opportunity. They say they are seeking what they call "substantial concessions" from the Cuban government: Havana must allow the local Roman Catholic Church a greater role in education, legally recognize its agencies, give it a fair voice in the government-controlled media and relax visa restrictions on foreign missionary priests and nuns.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2002
EVER SINCE the Greeks crossed the Aegean to lay siege to Troy, nation states have tried to win wars by surrounding their enemies and starving them out. As nations grew, so did the complexity of such tactics. Napoleon tried to blockade the continent of Europe. The Union tried the same against the Confederacy. What was once the military siege is now the economic embargo. It is employed by the United States most notably against Cuba and Iraq, but also against Iran, Libya and, in a limited way, other countries.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | February 25, 2008
ATLANTA -- Fidel Castro has had a powerful ally in his half-century of brutal rule: the U.S. government. The antiquated U.S. policy of complete isolation has done more to help Mr. Castro maintain his ruthless tyranny than any of his police-state tactics - brutally quashing dissent, ruining (or murdering) potential rivals, and occasionally allowing criminals and troublemakers to flee. Mr. Castro blamed the U.S. embargo for every misery visited upon Cuban citizens, from fuel shortages to food rationing to dwindling medical supplies.
NEWS
By Hector Tobar and Hector Tobar,Los Angeles Times | February 24, 2008
MEXICO CITY -- When Fidel Castro and his band of bearded rebels entered Havana just after New Year's Day 1959, Dwight Eisenhower was president of the United States, and few people questioned U.S. hegemony in Latin America. Castro declared himself a Communist, and nearly every government in the region joined the U.S. in condemning his regime. Two generations and nine American presidents later, Castro is finally stepping down as Cuba's leader - widely admired, even if his policies are not widely emulated.
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