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By Mike Giuliano | February 22, 2013
Jewish villagers facing religious discrimination in Czarist Russia in 1905 provide "Fiddler on the Roof" with very serious subject matter for a Broadway musical, but these villagers possess a sharp sense of humor that helps them carry their burdens. They also know how to carry a tune. Those are the showbiz ingredients that have made "Fiddler" one of the most enduringly popular shows. Its popularity is being reinforced yet again in a confidently staged production at Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia's current production of the classic Broadway musical "Fiddler On the Roof" gets everything right in its glowing celebration of tradition. Here, a close-knit family of seasoned professionals achieves theater excellence as they tell the story of dairyman hero Tevye, struggling to maintain his beloved traditions amid the changing values of his five daughters, each of whom needs a husband. This family's story is told against the backdrop of tiny village Anatevka's Jewish community working to survive Czarist Russia.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | November 30, 2007
The attempt to establish a movie as a "Hanukkah perennial" brings up bad memories of Jewish-American farces - Adam Sandler's Eight Crazy Nights or Adam Goldberg's The Hebrew Hammer. But the Senator Theatre has a better idea. Starting Tuesday, Hanukkah's first night, Baltimore's premier movie palace will present a collector's print of Fiddler on the Roof in four-track stereo, complete with a celebrity menorah-lighting before each evening show throughout the holiday. (An added attraction for movie lovers: This print was struck with the luxurious old Technicolor process known as dye imbibition.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | February 22, 2013
Jewish villagers facing religious discrimination in Czarist Russia in 1905 provide "Fiddler on the Roof" with very serious subject matter for a Broadway musical, but these villagers possess a sharp sense of humor that helps them carry their burdens. They also know how to carry a tune. Those are the showbiz ingredients that have made "Fiddler" one of the most enduringly popular shows. Its popularity is being reinforced yet again in a confidently staged production at Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 1999
A good "Fiddler on the Roof" is always a treat, and the folks at 2nd Star Productions have given us one.Fine singing is at the core of this "Fiddler," which will run weekends at the Bowie Playhouse in Whitemarsh Park through Dec. 4.Baritone Tom Zielinski was the first-class Figaro in the Annapolis Opera's "Marriage of Figaro" a couple of years ago. This time around, he cuts quite a swath through the role of Tevye the dairyman, the earthy, devout Ukrainian Jew...
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 31, 1992
Considering the fact that "Fiddler on the Roof" is a musical about changing traditions, it is surprising -- not to mention disappointing -- to see how little has changed in the production now playing a one-week run at the Lyric Opera House.Sammy Dallas Bayes, a member of the original Broadway cast, has re-created Jerome Robbins' 1964 direction and choreography with the diligence of an expert copiest. The result can perhaps best be described by using an element of the set as a metaphor.As it appears at the Lyric, designer James Noone's set includes two trees suspended from the flies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 22, 2009
The humble Jewish folk of Anatevka haven't changed much since they were first seen on the Broadway stage 45 years ago in a hit musical called "Fiddler on the Roof." The world hasn't changed much, either, at least not in terms of peaceful coexistence between people of different faiths and customs, which was really all that the Anatevkans yearned for in their little corner of cruel, czarist country. No wonder the touring production of "Fiddler" that has taken up temporary residence at the Hippodrome strikes such a strong chord.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 2001
Since the 1964 debut of the Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick musical, "Fiddler on the Roof," I've seen the show at least six times and watched it become part of our culture. "Sunrise, Sunset" has replaced "Here Comes the Bride" at most of the weddings I've attended over the past 30 years. Despite such familiar status, "Fiddler" proved new and enriching at Annapolis Chorale's concert rendition of the show last weekend. The musical is based on Sholom Aleichem's short story, "Tevye and His Daughters," a tale of a poor Jewish dairyman-philosopher living in a small Russian village, where he regularly converses with God. An excellent portrayal of Tevye was only one important element in the chorale's spectacular performance of "Fiddler," directed by J. Ernest Green.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 2006
If a Baltimore-based troupe hadn't snagged the name in 1916, Pasadena Theatre Company might more aptly be called the Vagabond Players. The nomadic group will open its new season next month with Fiddler on the Roof at Annapolis Area Christian School's Kerr Performing Arts Center in Severn - by rough count, its 13th home. Founded in 1978, the group first performed in the old A&P building on Crain Highway in Glen Burnie. President Sharon Steele said it moved to the Old Mill school complex in Millersville, then to Glen Burnie High School, Northeast High School in Pasadena, St. Bernadette Parish in Severn, and Baldwin Hall in Millersville.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,special to the sun | September 15, 2006
Fiddler on the Roof is called a classic with good reason -- just about everyone knows the story of a father struggling to hang onto religious and family traditions, or some of its many enduring philosophical songs, including "If I Were a Rich Man," "Matchmaker, Matchmaker" and "Sunrise, Sunset." Making the 1964 musical seem fresh requires a great cast and crew.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
Almost 50 years after its 1964 Broadway opening, composer Jerry Bock's and lyricist Sheldon Harnick's "Fiddler on the Roof" continues to touch hearts with its hero's adherence to cherished religious traditions. The 40-member cast assembled by 2nd Star director Brian Douglas brings fresh life to the story of dairyman Tevye and his family, playing at Bowie Playhouse in Whitemarsh Park. Having previously co-directed at 2nd Star, Douglas assumes his first full-fledged 2nd Star directing assignment with this production.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 21, 2010
Lin-Manuel Miranda is prompt, voluble and animated. Over the phone, his words come tumbling out in a great rush, and he takes command of the conversation as easily and dexterously as he assumed command of the Broadway stage. He conceived of "In the Heights" back in 1999, when he was a sophomore at Wesleyan University. Nine years later, his musical about a close-knit Latino neighborhood in New York made it to Broadway. Audiences and critics fell for the show, which boasts a propulsive score infused with salsa, merengue and hip-hop, and which won the 2008 Tony Award for best musical.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 22, 2009
The humble Jewish folk of Anatevka haven't changed much since they were first seen on the Broadway stage 45 years ago in a hit musical called "Fiddler on the Roof." The world hasn't changed much, either, at least not in terms of peaceful coexistence between people of different faiths and customs, which was really all that the Anatevkans yearned for in their little corner of cruel, czarist country. No wonder the touring production of "Fiddler" that has taken up temporary residence at the Hippodrome strikes such a strong chord.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
Sunrise, sunset. The actor known by just his last name - Topol - first played the part of Tevye the Milkman in "Fiddler on the Roof" in Tel Aviv in 1966, when he was 30 years old. Some 44 years later, he will play Tevye for the twenty-seven-hundred-and-somethingth time when he opens Tuesday at the Hippodrome Theatre in what is being billed as his farewell tour. "I stopped counting after I reached 2,500 performances," Topol says over the phone. "This is one of the five best parts ever written for a male actor-singer.
TRAVEL
By Tim Wheeler and Tim Wheeler,The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2009
17th Annual Berlin Fiddlers Convention Where:: Berlin When: : Sept. 25-27 What: : Like bluegrass? Why not check out the 17th annual Berlin Fiddlers Convention, three days of free live music in the historic Eastern Shore town not far from Ocean City? Musicians from all over the country are expected to compete for $3,400 in cash prizes. The winning band is invited back to perform the following year. This year's opening act is Sarah Beth & Company, a local group judged best bluegrass band at last year's hoedown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | March 20, 2008
I was completely in the dark about Amp Fiddler. Two years ago, I read about his latest album, the excellent Afro Strut, on a blog whose name I don't remember. But I immediately dug the inviting album snippets posted on the site, and I made a mental note: Next time you're out, support the brother and buy his CD. I certainly don't regret spending the $20 on the indie soul album. And I'm no longer shocked that such fine music flies way under the mainstream radar these days. It's a shame: Afro Strut, released in 2006, was one of the best R&B records that not nearly enough people heard that year.
NEWS
By Rosalie M.Falter | July 30, 1991
I recently had the pleasure of attending "Fiddler on the Roof" at the Annapolis Dinner Theatre and was entertained by a talented neighbor.Brian Ooysterwyk, the son of Carol and Dick Ooysterwyk, turned in an excellent performance as Mendel, the rabbi's son and one half ofthe ghost Promessera.Brian began the audition process for "Fiddler" in the spring. He auditioned for the part with a prepared piece of music for the musical director and a dance routine for the choreographer. After two call-backs, Brian was selected.
NEWS
By Sarah Brzezinski and Sarah Brzezinski,RIVER HILL HIGH SCHOOL | March 25, 2005
Continuing a tradition of spectacular shows at Mount Hebron High School, last weekend's production of Fiddler on the Roof was an entrancing embodiment of the students' skills. The show, based on writings of the Yiddish author Sholom Aleichem, has captivated audiences with its intermingling themes of love, persecution, poverty and change since it was adapted for the stage in 1964. Residing in the Jewish village of Anatevka, Russia, about 1905, impoverished dairyman Tevye faces the tribulations of preserving traditions and culture in a swiftly changing, hostile world.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | November 30, 2007
The attempt to establish a movie as a "Hanukkah perennial" brings up bad memories of Jewish-American farces - Adam Sandler's Eight Crazy Nights or Adam Goldberg's The Hebrew Hammer. But the Senator Theatre has a better idea. Starting Tuesday, Hanukkah's first night, Baltimore's premier movie palace will present a collector's print of Fiddler on the Roof in four-track stereo, complete with a celebrity menorah-lighting before each evening show throughout the holiday. (An added attraction for movie lovers: This print was struck with the luxurious old Technicolor process known as dye imbibition.
NEWS
By Sharahn D. Boykin and Sharahn D. Boykin,Sun Reporter | July 11, 2007
Money and organized sports for kids were both in short supply when the Enfield children were growing up. What there was plenty of on their 200-acre dairy farm in Frederick County was horses. So between their chores, Ken, Robert and Linda Enfield took up jousting, a sport their father has competed in since his teen years. "We could milk in the morning, joust during the day, and come back in the evening and milk," said Linda Minneck, now 52. Today, four generations of Enfields compete in the sport, with five family members in the National Jousting Hall of Fame.
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