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October 2, 1997
Characters -- real and fictional -- who don't behave as one might expect offer up some interesting choices for viewers tonight.People up in arms over ABC's "Nothing Sacred" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) and its depiction of an unorthodox Catholic priest who spends considerable time questioning himself and his church should find a kindred spirit here tonight: John Cullum ("Northern Exposure") plays a husband who refuses to attend his wife's funeral because he disagrees with Father Ray (Kevin Anderson)
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NEWS
By David Horsey | May 20, 2014
The late, great New York senator, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, famously said, "You are entitled to your opinion, but you are not entitled to your own facts. " That sentiment, however wise, seems sadly quaint in an era when many Americans strongly prefer a "reality" that conforms to their opinion, not to objective facts. A fresh case in point is Marco Rubio, the boyish Florida senator who is considered a serious contender for the U.S. presidency in 2016. Sunday, on ABC's "This Week," Mr. Rubio said, "I do not believe that human activity is causing these dramatic changes to our climate the way these scientists are portraying it," adding that he also did "not believe that the laws that they propose we pass will do anything about it, except it will destroy our economy.
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NEWS
September 25, 1992
It was all in fun, of course, but Vice President Dan Quayle probably couldn't help wincing during the hour-long tele-bashing endured on Monday night's episode of "Murphy Brown." Mr. Quayle picked a fight with the fictional sitcom heroine last spring when he chided her as a poor role model for choosing to bear a fictional baby even though she was not married to the child's fictional father.This year's season-opener might well have been titled, "The Cultural Elite Strikes Back." Series creator Diane English managed to weave Mr. Quayle's criticism -- and Murphy's indignant reaction -- into the story so seamlessly that viewers experienced something akin to vertigo trying to distinguish art from life.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 7, 2014
President Obama was doing his favorite thing this week: talking to crowds of adoring young people who already agree with him while acting like he persuaded them about something. They also seemed to give Obama the impression that he's a really funny guy. On Wednesday, he told a crowd of 1,400 at the University of Michigan that he visited a local deli, Zingerman's. He proceeded to tell a long story about ordering the small Reuben sandwich, which he said was "killer. " That description got a good laugh.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | April 5, 1992
As Paul Fussell sees it, we can only remember crucial moments in our lives when the facts can be made to fit one of a small number of fictional plots, the roots of which date back thousands of years.Speaking at a scientific and cultural symposium on memory at Johns Hopkins Hospital yesterday, the author of "The Great War and Modern Memory" said we use the tremendous power of stories and myths to shape our past. In turn, those myths seem to determine which memories we keep and which we toss away.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,jean.marbella@baltsun.com | September 4, 2008
I miss Murphy Brown. Not so much the sitcom of old, although I did watch it regularly and loved Candice Bergen's sass and style (great white shirts, cool accessories) as TV reporter Murphy Brown. But what I really miss is a time when campaign discourse about unwed pregnancy centered on a grown-up, albeit fictional, woman rather than a 17-year-old, and very real, girl. Back then - 1992, to be exact - it was slightly comical when Vice President Dan Quayle triggered a dispute by holding up Murphy Brown as a symbol of the breakdown in family values because the fictional character had a fictional baby out of fictional wedlock.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday | February 21, 1998
Director John Singleton's "Rosewood" (8 p.m.-10: 30 p.m., HBO) is a breathtaking story of the tragic events in Rosewood, Fla. in 1923, when a black, economically flourishing town of Rosewood was attacked by neighboring poor whites. All but a handful of the townsfolk were killed, and one house was left standing. Even more chilling was the fact that no one spoke of the massacre for 60 years.Singleton does a good job showing the mounting hysteria of those few days. And he gets good performances from Esther Rolle, Don Cheadle and Jon Voight as a white shop owner whose relationship to the people of Rosewood is drawn with realistic ambiguity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Daniel J. Kornstein and Daniel J. Kornstein,Special to the Sun | December 17, 2000
"Protect and Defend," by Richard North Patterson. Alfred A. Knopf. 549 pages. $26.95. It is always risky for a practicing lawyer to read a legal thriller. The legal practitioner reads such a novel with both a jaded and a critical eye. If the author errs as to tone or substance, if the author makes a technical mistake, the lawyer-reader snickers and, thinking of his or her own courtroom experience, says, sotto voce: "I could do better than that." Not so with the latest book by the prolific and talented Richard North Patterson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2008
The Development by John Barth Houghton Mifflin / 167 pages / $23 Considered a writer's writer, John Barth crams his prose with narrative tricks, literary allusions, figurative language and dirty jokes. Although the results can be head-spinning, they are also funny and tragic - at the same time. Barth's latest book of nine interlocking short stories, The Development, shows him as a master of the form. Barth (winner of the National Book, the PEN/Malamud and the Lannan Foundation Lifetime Achievement awards)
NEWS
By Froma Harrop | June 17, 1999
THESE characters are fictional. Mr. and Mrs. Ewing of Passaic, N.J., tell their 15-year-old daughter Amy: "No tattoos." A month later at Monmouth Beach, Amy bends over to pick up her mascara wand, and her bathing suit rides up in back. What do the Ewings see on her left lower buttock but a tattoo of a red rose. Amy has defied her parents. Whose problem is it? Why, it's Gov. Christine Todd Whitman's, of course.Indeed -- and this part is not fictional -- social conservatives in the state of New Jersey are trying to put this matter onto the desk of the governor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Baltimore novelist Laura Lippman's husband, David Simon, once suggested that she write a novel based on the real-life disappearance of local gambling kingpin Julius "The Lord" Salsbury. Naturally, she ignored him. "David saw the story with a reporter's heart and intellect," said Lippman, who, like Simon, is a former reporter for The Baltimore Sun. "He still has this passion for fact and investigation and getting the real story. When he brought me Julius Salsbury, he said, 'Maybe you'll figure out where he went.' " Salsbury fled the state in 1970 while awaiting the outcome of his appeal on a federal gambling conviction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Richards | January 28, 2014
There's a scene in the first episode of the new web series "BFA" that quickly tells you this isn't another navel-gazer about life as a 20-something in New York or Los Angeles. Our protagonists, a group of Baltimore actors who make up the fictional Stick People Theatre Company, have just put on an edgy performance in their partially renovated rowhouse. The audience - five lonely souls - is told afterward by emcee Sarah Pearl (played by 23-year-old Katie Hileman) that cupcakes and beer are available as refreshments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Documentaries were supposed to be a dying genre -- and living proof that we were becoming dumber as a nation. Reality TV is cheaper and easier to make. And who has time for lengthy, in-depth explorations of anything any more in the age of Twitter? Docs were dead, the conventional wisdom decreed, another victim of our rats-on-LSD attention spans. But everywhere you look these days, it seems as if there's another documentary premiering. And some filmmakers believe that's the result of a change in audience attitudes toward the troubled state of American life today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
They were novels discussed in whispers during class, passed around among groups of friends and read by flashlight late into the night. They explored serious topics - race and class, body image, sex, addiction, divorce. And, says author and critic Lizzie Skurnick, these young-adult novels were real literature that didn't get the respect they deserved. Now Skurnick, a former Baltimore resident who received her master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars, is bringing them back Her imprint, Lizzie Skurnick Books, has republished four classic young-adult novels since its launch in September.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Sex that compares to supernovas, solar systems, quarks and atomic nuclei? Oh my. Such is the (possibly over-)heated prose of UMBC professor Manil Suri, whose literary description of the sexual act in his novel "The City of Devi" was so overwhelming in its cosmic significance that he's been awarded the coveted Bad Sex In Fiction award by Britain's Literary Review. Here's a sample of Suri's work, tame enough to be published in an all-audiences forum: "Surely supernovas explode that instant, somewhere, in some galaxy.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
A few years back, Nathan “Bodie” Barksdale had a public spat with “The Wire” creator David Simon over the extent to which he was an inspiration for drug boss Avon Barksdale in the series. All the while, he vowed that he was long out of the game. But now the Drug Enforcement Administration says Barksdale is a high-ranking member of the Black Guerrilla Family. U.S. marshals arrested him this week on federal heroin and gun charges after he spent a short spell on the run. Barksdale, 52, is accused of taking part in a heroin conspiracy with alleged drug supplier Suraj Tairu, who is also charged in the case.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2001
Twelve years after Rufus Juskus' wife died of Hodgkin's disease, he decided to put his feelings about grieving on paper, not knowing where the journey would take him. What emerged was Blueprint, Juskus' first published novel that gives a fictional account of coping with the death of his wife. Set in Columbia, the book was published this summer and ultimately helped Juskus come to terms with his grief. "I didn't set out for it to be a therapeutic exercise," said Juskus, 51, of Columbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | July 17, 2005
NOVEL UNTIL I FIND YOU By John Irving. Random House. 819 pages. Skeptical critics, ever-mindful of literary fashion, underrate him, but John Irving, a perennial best-selling novelist, has continued to rebel valiantly against the fictional demands of postmodernism. Until I Find You, his brilliant 11th novel, finds Irving once more in the realm of realism, and, with 819 pages, at a length rivaling that of Tom Jones and Moby Dick. Not for Irving are the pale, cardboard quasi-characters of the postmodern novel nor the death of the authorial persona.
NEWS
November 20, 2013
“Fallacies do not cease to be fallacies because they become fashions.” - G.K. Chesterton With the gubernatorial campaign in full swing, and the Maryland General Assembly's legislative session less than two months away, we're going to see a lot of talk from state politicians about tax cuts and spending cuts. Most of what you'll hear or read about those issues will be pure prevarications. At a forum on state manufacturing, Democratic and Republican candidates supported the idea of cutting the state's corporate income tax rate . Attorney General Doug Gansler, a Democrat, and Republican candidates Harford County Executive David Craig, Del. Ron George and Charles Lollar all support some form of reduction in the corporate income tax rate.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
The Colonial Players troupe is opening its 65th season with an invitation for audiences to embark on an adventure of new voices and broad horizons — namely a time travel adventure written by prolific British master of farce, Alan Ayckbourn. "Communicating Doors" is a daring departure from Ayckbourn's comedy, "Taking Steps," which closed Colonial Players' previous season. The show asks us to suspend disbelief — or at least stretch it to accept what may be possible through time travel.
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