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By Katherine Dunn and Lem Satterfield and Katherine Dunn and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1998
If Baltimore-area teams weren't already motivated for tomorrow's private schools' state tournament, Washington-area attorney Robin Ficker called The Sun recently to provide some bulletin-board material.Ficker, who is known nationally for his heckling at the former Washington Bullets (now the Wizards) games, has a son who is a reserve wrestler for DeMatha, ranked No. 4 by the Maryland State Wrestling Association and defending private school state champ and National Preps champ."[Archbishop]
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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
Former Montgomery County delegate, county executive candidate and well-known sports heckler Robin K.A. Ficker is out of the practice of law for at least a year. The Maryland Court of Appeals suspended his law license yesterday, saying that despite four previous warnings, he ran his Bethesda law office in a slipshod way to the detriment of clients. "I will be back practicing in a year," Ficker said yesterday, adding that his associates will continue to staff the office without him. With his real estate sales business, efforts to roll back the state sales tax and other initiatives, he said, "I've got plenty on my plate."
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
Former Montgomery County delegate, county executive candidate and well-known sports heckler Robin K.A. Ficker is out of the practice of law for at least a year. The Maryland Court of Appeals suspended his law license yesterday, saying that despite four previous warnings, he ran his Bethesda law office in a slipshod way to the detriment of clients. "I will be back practicing in a year," Ficker said yesterday, adding that his associates will continue to staff the office without him. With his real estate sales business, efforts to roll back the state sales tax and other initiatives, he said, "I've got plenty on my plate."
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Jonathan Pitts and Tom Dunkel and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2004
Consider this a sign of how out of control behavior has gotten at sporting events: Robin Ficker - former scourge of NBA players and referees, the infamous foghorn fan of the Washington Bullets whose courtside seats were revoked by management - suddenly sounds like the voice of reason. The 61-year-old Rockville attorney and self-confessed fanatic used to taunt Chicago Bulls forward Scottie Pippen by reciting the names of ex-girlfriends and rankle Phil Jackson by reading excerpts about his youthful drug use from the coach's autobiography.
SPORTS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
The Maryland Court of Appeals suspended yesterday the law license of Robin Ficker, the former Montgomery County delegate and chief heckler at Washington Bullets games, for running his high-volume Bethesda law practice "like a taxicab company."He dispatched to court whichever lawyer in his office was available, and supervision in his office was so lax that he and others in his practice failed to appear in court, according to the 36-page opinion. Lawyers who worked for him allegedly appeared in court unprepared and, in one case, one of his lawyers went to the wrong court.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2004
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s increased fees and taxes are already causing a backlash from one of Maryland's leading anti-tax activists. Robin Ficker, whose most recent campaign was a failed effort to win the GOP nomination for Maryland's 8th Congressional District, cryptically announced plans yesterday to put together a primary challenge to Ehrlich in the 2006 gubernatorial election. "It's not personal. It's not about any politicians," Ficker said yesterday. "You have people raising fees, raising taxes - the car tax, the state property tax, the sewer tax - because the state has too many priorities."
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1999
If shaking hands with potential voters translates into votes, Republican Robin Ficker is a shoo-in to win election to the U.S. Senate next year.In officially announcing his candidacy yesterday for the seat held by U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, Ficker noted that he has shaken hands with more than 560,000 people during 2 1/2 years of campaigning around the state.Ficker, a former state delegate from western Montgomery County, has become a common sight at countless events around Maryland, ranging from Orioles games and street festivals to Monday's Bob Dylan concert in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield | November 18, 1999
A Montgomery County Circuit Court judge denied yesterday the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association's move to block a lawsuit seeking another upper-weight class for public high school wrestling.Attorney Robin Ficker, who sued in September, said Judge James Chapin also scheduled four days beginning Jan. 10 to hear arguments, after which he will rule on whether a 215-pound weight class should be created. The state's heaviest classifications are 189 pounds and unlimited (a maximum of 275 pounds)
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1998
A Montgomery County Circuit judge has removed a tax cap referendum from the local November ballot. The ruling could doom a similar 2-year-old law in neighboring Prince George's County.The petition ballot question, championed by anti-tax crusader Robin Ficker and signed by more than 10,000 voters, would have required the Montgomery County Council to get voter approval for every tax increase.Judge James C. Chapin ruled yesterday in Rockville that the so-called Ficker Amendment was unconstitutional because it would have prevented the County Council from using tax-raising powers granted under state law.Further, Chapin said that because the amendment was illegal, it could not remain on the ballot even as a "straw vote" on the issue of tax increases.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 6, 1999
A lawsuit has been filed in Montgomery County Circuit Court to require the Maryland Board of Education to institute an additional upper weight class for state high school wrestling.Attorney Robin Ficker filed the suit last week on behalf of himself and several parents of wrestlers in an attempt to create a 215-pound weight class. The state's heaviest classifications are 189 pounds and unlimited. Lighter unlimited wrestlers often are matched against much heavier opponents."It's a real health and safety issue," Ficker said.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2004
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s increased fees and taxes are already causing a backlash from one of Maryland's leading anti-tax activists. Robin Ficker, whose most recent campaign was a failed effort to win the GOP nomination for Maryland's 8th Congressional District, cryptically announced plans yesterday to put together a primary challenge to Ehrlich in the 2006 gubernatorial election. "It's not personal. It's not about any politicians," Ficker said yesterday. "You have people raising fees, raising taxes - the car tax, the state property tax, the sewer tax - because the state has too many priorities."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2003
Montgomery County voters have petitioned a proposal for a tougher property tax limit on next year's election ballot, election officials confirmed yesterday, setting off the fourth such effort there in the past decade. "The [Montgomery] population is increasing slowly, but the county budget is up 50 percent in six years," said Robin Ficker, a Republican whose property tax limit petitions were certified Thursday by the Montgomery County election board. Ficker's amendment would remove the Montgomery council's ability to override a 1990 inflation-linked limit on property tax increases.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2000
SALISBURY -- Eight Republican hopefuls for the U.S. Senate took their campaigns last night to the hometown of Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, the four-term Democrat each hopes to challenge next fall. Striving for recognition just two-and-a-half weeks before voters will select one of them in the GOP primary March 7, the candidates spoke to a crowd of about 100, knowing that the 90-minute forum was being broadcast live on cable television and will soon be available via the Internet. The event was organized by the GOP central committees of Somerset, Worcester, Wicomico and Dorchester counties.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2000
ROCKVILLE -- Montgomery County Circuit Court Judge James Chapin yesterday found that the state high school association's wrestling committee was not "arbitrary or capricious" in its actions and denied an attempt by attorney Robin Ficker to force the institution of a 215-pound weight class for this winter season. The state's heaviest classifications are 189 pounds and heavyweight (275 pounds maximum). Ficker filed suit in late July on behalf of several parents of wrestlers. He argued Monday that "you can have a 190-pound, 14-year-old wrestling a 19-year-old, 275-pounder."
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield | November 18, 1999
A Montgomery County Circuit Court judge denied yesterday the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association's move to block a lawsuit seeking another upper-weight class for public high school wrestling.Attorney Robin Ficker, who sued in September, said Judge James Chapin also scheduled four days beginning Jan. 10 to hear arguments, after which he will rule on whether a 215-pound weight class should be created. The state's heaviest classifications are 189 pounds and unlimited (a maximum of 275 pounds)
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1999
If shaking hands with potential voters translates into votes, Republican Robin Ficker is a shoo-in to win election to the U.S. Senate next year.In officially announcing his candidacy yesterday for the seat held by U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, Ficker noted that he has shaken hands with more than 560,000 people during 2 1/2 years of campaigning around the state.Ficker, a former state delegate from western Montgomery County, has become a common sight at countless events around Maryland, ranging from Orioles games and street festivals to Monday's Bob Dylan concert in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2000
ROCKVILLE -- Montgomery County Circuit Court Judge James Chapin yesterday found that the state high school association's wrestling committee was not "arbitrary or capricious" in its actions and denied an attempt by attorney Robin Ficker to force the institution of a 215-pound weight class for this winter season. The state's heaviest classifications are 189 pounds and heavyweight (275 pounds maximum). Ficker filed suit in late July on behalf of several parents of wrestlers. He argued Monday that "you can have a 190-pound, 14-year-old wrestling a 19-year-old, 275-pounder."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2003
Montgomery County voters have petitioned a proposal for a tougher property tax limit on next year's election ballot, election officials confirmed yesterday, setting off the fourth such effort there in the past decade. "The [Montgomery] population is increasing slowly, but the county budget is up 50 percent in six years," said Robin Ficker, a Republican whose property tax limit petitions were certified Thursday by the Montgomery County election board. Ficker's amendment would remove the Montgomery council's ability to override a 1990 inflation-linked limit on property tax increases.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 6, 1999
A lawsuit has been filed in Montgomery County Circuit Court to require the Maryland Board of Education to institute an additional upper weight class for state high school wrestling.Attorney Robin Ficker filed the suit last week on behalf of himself and several parents of wrestlers in an attempt to create a 215-pound weight class. The state's heaviest classifications are 189 pounds and unlimited. Lighter unlimited wrestlers often are matched against much heavier opponents."It's a real health and safety issue," Ficker said.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1998
A Montgomery County Circuit judge has removed a tax cap referendum from the local November ballot. The ruling could doom a similar 2-year-old law in neighboring Prince George's County.The petition ballot question, championed by anti-tax crusader Robin Ficker and signed by more than 10,000 voters, would have required the Montgomery County Council to get voter approval for every tax increase.Judge James C. Chapin ruled yesterday in Rockville that the so-called Ficker Amendment was unconstitutional because it would have prevented the County Council from using tax-raising powers granted under state law.Further, Chapin said that because the amendment was illegal, it could not remain on the ballot even as a "straw vote" on the issue of tax increases.
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