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By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | October 21, 2007
College Park -- Maryland lost more than its homecoming game against Virginia last night - the Terps also lost their second starting offensive lineman in two weeks. Left guard Jaimie Thomas broke his right fibula early in the second quarter and is out for the rest of season, coach Ralph Friedgen said last night after his team's disappointing, 18-17 homecoming loss to Virginia. Right guard Andrew Crummey broke his left fibula on Oct. 6 against Georgia Tech. Clemson @Maryland Saturday, 3:30 p.m., chs. 2, 7, 105.7 FM, 1300 AM
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SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | July 28, 2014
CHICAGO -- Stefon Diggs has typically been out on the practice field with Maryland quarterback C.J. Brown at least once a week leading up to preseason practice. He has been running routes, stretching his legs and continuing to work his way back from the broken his right fibula  that ended his season just seven games into last year. And while the leg may have prevented him from taking part in the majority of spring practice, the junior wide receiver said Monday at the Big Ten media days that it's no longer an issue.
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SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | December 1, 2006
How the game was lost It looked like the bad old days for the Ravens, whose offense struggled on a wet, dreary night in Cincinnati. The Ravens made enough mistakes to drop a 13-7 decision to the Bengals and failed to clinch the AFC North. Steve McNair had trouble passing in the rain, but the Ravens still had a chance to pull out the game in the final minute. Their onside kick was caught by Cincinnati's Keiwan Ratliff to snuff out their last chance. The Ravens also took a major hit when kick returner B.J. Sams was lost for the season with a broken right fibula.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
INDIANAPOLIS - A 78-inch wingspan and a rehabilitated right lower leg were prominent on Jaimie Thomas' resume when the former Maryland left guard reported to the NFL scouting combine this week. After four weeks of training in Atlanta, Thomas was finally ready for the next step in his hoped-for transition to the NFL. "Right now it's pretty intense," Thomas said. "It's basically a job interview. My job is to get my body in the best physical shape I can and perform the best I can." Thomas is joined at the combine by center Edwin Williams, linebacker Moise Fokou, cornerback Kevin Barnes and wide receiver Darrius Heyward-Bey from Maryland.
SPORTS
By Special to The Evening Sun | April 29, 1993
CHARLES TOWN, W. Va. -- Jockey Frankie Martinez will be sidelined up to five months after suffering a broken right leg and a broken left wrist in a training mishap here Tuesday.Martinez was unseated from Grandpa's Shadow when the 2-year-old Darryl Boyer-trained filly shied from another horse while entering the track for a workout, wheeled and began bucking uncontrollably.The Charles Town native was transported via track ambulance to nearby Jefferson Memorial Hospital and later was transferred to Winchester Medical Center.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | January 4, 2008
You don't have to like Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Terrell Owens, but you do have to respect his toughness. After suffering a high ankle sprain Dec. 22, he's already walking without a protective boot and is expected to play in the Cowboys' divisional playoff game Jan. 13.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
David Keltz from Seton Hill has been portraying Edgar Allan Poe in one-man shows since 1992, and regularly performs at the Poe museums in Baltimore, Richmond and Philadelphia.This weekend, Keltz arrives in the Czech Republic capital of Prague for the International Poe Festival, where the 54-year-old actor will be performing through October. We talked with Poe's impersonator -- out of character -- before he left Baltimore:Your resume says you perform an abbreviated one-man show. How much do you charge for 10 minutes?
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | January 19, 1992
Close your eyes and try to picture the Dark Ages. See nothing? Probably.Few people are aware of the visual legacy of the Dark Ages -- roughly a period from the 4th to the 8th centuries A.D., ending before the Middle Ages began.Thanks to a new exhibition at Ariadne Galleries in New York City and its catalog, both titled "Treasures of the Dark Ages in Europe," we now can see that the barbarian tribes who spread across Europe wore gleaming jewelry inlaid with precious stones, and their horses wore fancy trappings.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun Reporter | October 24, 2007
COLLEGE PARK -- Before the season started, freshman Haroon Brown was somewhat of an afterthought in the Terps' 2007 recruiting class - a signing day addition to fill out the class, the last to be offered a scholarship. This weekend, he'll be Maryland's starting fullback. "I always prepare for the possibility," he said. " ... I was known to be a gamer in high school - I always played big in the games - so, hopefully, I keep that nickname up." Brown, of Phoebus High in Hampton, Va., is one of several young Terps whose career has been fast-tracked because of an injury, as starter Cory Jackson had an operation yesterday on his broken hand and will miss Saturday's 3:30 p.m. home game against Clemson.
NEWS
By Steve McKerrow | January 5, 1993
THE ingredients, in a few candid words: a dog, a soccer ball and a fallen tree branch.The results: a fractured fibula -- and a thoroughly disappointing story.People are crushed to hear the truth of how I broke my leg. Saying you tripped over a branch in the back yard while romping with a big Labrador retriever puppy sounds so unexciting, so haphazardly accidental."Skiing or bicycling?" said one acquaintance, the first day I ventured into the office on crutches. Familiar with my seasonal passions, he glowed with anticipation, but soon dimmed upon hearing the banal dog/ball/branch verity.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | January 4, 2008
You don't have to like Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Terrell Owens, but you do have to respect his toughness. After suffering a high ankle sprain Dec. 22, he's already walking without a protective boot and is expected to play in the Cowboys' divisional playoff game Jan. 13.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun Reporter | October 24, 2007
COLLEGE PARK -- Before the season started, freshman Haroon Brown was somewhat of an afterthought in the Terps' 2007 recruiting class - a signing day addition to fill out the class, the last to be offered a scholarship. This weekend, he'll be Maryland's starting fullback. "I always prepare for the possibility," he said. " ... I was known to be a gamer in high school - I always played big in the games - so, hopefully, I keep that nickname up." Brown, of Phoebus High in Hampton, Va., is one of several young Terps whose career has been fast-tracked because of an injury, as starter Cory Jackson had an operation yesterday on his broken hand and will miss Saturday's 3:30 p.m. home game against Clemson.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | October 21, 2007
College Park -- Maryland lost more than its homecoming game against Virginia last night - the Terps also lost their second starting offensive lineman in two weeks. Left guard Jaimie Thomas broke his right fibula early in the second quarter and is out for the rest of season, coach Ralph Friedgen said last night after his team's disappointing, 18-17 homecoming loss to Virginia. Right guard Andrew Crummey broke his left fibula on Oct. 6 against Georgia Tech. Clemson @Maryland Saturday, 3:30 p.m., chs. 2, 7, 105.7 FM, 1300 AM
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun Reporter | October 7, 2007
COLLEGE PARK -- Maryland lost probably its top offensive lineman for the rest of the season yesterday when three-year starter Andrew Crummey suffered a broken left fibula, coach Ralph Friedgen said. "I feel bad for Andrew because he was having a great year," Friedgen said. "I think he's an All-ACC player. It's just unfortunate for him because he's a senior and he means a lot to our football team. He's just a wonderful kid. To have your college career end this way is a sad thing." With 12:39 left in the first half, the Terps' right guard was carted off the field and hopped on his right leg into the trainers' room.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN REPORTER | December 1, 2006
CINCINNATI -- The Ravens' return game suffered a significant blow when return specialist B.J. Sams broke his right fibula during last night's 13-7 loss to the Bengals. Sams will miss the rest of the season. The loss of Sams, who entered last night's game ranked fifth in the NFL in kickoff return average and seventh in punt return average, left the Ravens scrambling. Cornerback Corey Ivy, who is not listed on the depth chart as a returner, took back one kickoff return and was in position for four punt returns, fumbling one. "My heart goes out to B.J.," special teams coordinator Frank Gansz Jr. said.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | December 1, 2006
How the game was lost It looked like the bad old days for the Ravens, whose offense struggled on a wet, dreary night in Cincinnati. The Ravens made enough mistakes to drop a 13-7 decision to the Bengals and failed to clinch the AFC North. Steve McNair had trouble passing in the rain, but the Ravens still had a chance to pull out the game in the final minute. Their onside kick was caught by Cincinnati's Keiwan Ratliff to snuff out their last chance. The Ravens also took a major hit when kick returner B.J. Sams was lost for the season with a broken right fibula.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | August 29, 2004
The NFL's four-game exhibition season is too long, too hazardous and too irrelevant to serve the purpose for which it once was intended. Under the current format, injuries are piling up before opening day, seasons are lost before they officially start and careers are often shortened needlessly. What other business eliminates as many assets before starting on the work clock as the NFL does? How much is too much when you're talking about blown out knees and fractured fibulas? When is enough really enough?
SPORTS
By David Steele | February 2, 2005
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- The T.O. Paradox was in full effect yesterday morning at Super Bowl media day. A throng that routinely and reflexively gets outraged over Terrell Owens' every movement and utterance wedged themselves in front of him for a solid hour to hear every outrageous comment he could offer. Nobody left disappointed -- except, maybe, those who couldn't get down to the Alltel Stadium field soon enough to catch his entire dialogue. Depending on where one was when the doors to the mass interview session opened, it took 10 to 15 minutes to be funneled from the concourse level to the row of podiums.
SPORTS
By David Steele | February 2, 2005
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- The T.O. Paradox was in full effect yesterday morning at Super Bowl media day. A throng that routinely and reflexively gets outraged over Terrell Owens' every movement and utterance wedged themselves in front of him for a solid hour to hear every outrageous comment he could offer. Nobody left disappointed -- except, maybe, those who couldn't get down to the Alltel Stadium field soon enough to catch his entire dialogue. Depending on where one was when the doors to the mass interview session opened, it took 10 to 15 minutes to be funneled from the concourse level to the row of podiums.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | August 29, 2004
The NFL's four-game exhibition season is too long, too hazardous and too irrelevant to serve the purpose for which it once was intended. Under the current format, injuries are piling up before opening day, seasons are lost before they officially start and careers are often shortened needlessly. What other business eliminates as many assets before starting on the work clock as the NFL does? How much is too much when you're talking about blown out knees and fractured fibulas? When is enough really enough?
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