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NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
Leasing office space in this economy can be a challenge, especially in older buildings, but Taylor Fields is working on getting an edge: a super-fast fiber-optic broadband connection. "One of the first things [prospective tenants] ask is what kind of Internet service we have," said Fields, a Timonium-based commercial leasing agent for the James F. Knott Realty Corp. "They all want fast Internet. " As work begins on a fiber-optic broadband network that will connect every Maryland school, hospital, police station — and even more public buildings — businesses also want to get involved.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
Hundreds of miles of new fiber-optic cable about as thick as a garden hose are lighting 21st-century ambitions from one end of Maryland to the other. Economic development officials imagine businesses opening or expanding thanks to more robust Internet connections. School administrators envision students using more electronic resources and foresee greater collaboration between schools. Some folks just look forward to dumping their dial-up modems. "We're providing a new highway system touching every area of the state," said Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, whose technology staff took a lead role in the Central Maryland portion of the statewide project called the One Maryland Broadband Network.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | December 26, 1990
Four-year-old Jackie Topa came to Baltimore to sing some well-rehearsed songs for her father, an Army reservist stationed in Jacksonville, Fla.The songs, she said, were "about Christmas and all that kind of stuff."Nikki Haagenson's children came with the chicken pox. But they also had something better to share with a father spending Christmas so many miles away: a list of what Santa brought.At CSX Railroad's Baltimore headquarters yesterday, a bit of Christmas magic and some high-quality fiber optics helped reunite children with parents, husbands with wives, fathers with sons.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2012
Zayo Group announced Tuesday that it has acquired FiberGate Inc. and its network of fiber optic lines stretching from Northern Virginia to Baltimore. The $117 million purchase adds 399 new route miles and 130,000 fiber miles in the combined Washington, D.C./Baltimore metro areas to Zayo's network. FiberGate, based in Alexandria, Va., has been providing fiber optic services to the federal government, large enterprise and carrier customers for almost 17 years. "As a result of the acquisition, we will have one of the most comprehensive fiber networks in the D.C. area of any provider," said Dan Caruse, CEO of Colorado-based Zayo.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1997
In an unusual and potentially lucrative deal, Baltimore County would get a cut of any services Comcast Cablevision offers through its new fiber optic network -- even if they don't involve television.The proposed 15-year agreement, which goes well beyond the typical cable franchise, guarantees the county won't be left behind as the cable industry develops profitable new fiber-optic ventures -- which could include anything from high-speed Internet access to local telephone service. The county gets about $4.3 million annually from Comcast's cable television franchise deal, but no estimates have been made on future revenues.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2001
Thousands of engineers and businessmen will sink their teeth into a high-fiber diet at a conference next week in Baltimore, but with a slowdown in the telecommunications sector, the crowd will be slightly smaller than last year. About 8,700 people are expected at the National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference at the Baltimore Convention Center, according to David Burpee, general manager for the event. The conference, a highly technical event at which telecom companies showcase their products and industry experts run workshops, had about 9,000 attendees last year in Denver, Burpee said.
NEWS
March 15, 1992
The drama of light -- without danger of shock -- enhances the edge of this Sylvan Pool. Fiber optics in the form of neon have been used in commercial applications, such as store signs, for more than 100 years. Recently, the lighting method has made its way into residence design.In this Maryland pool, halogen gas in a tube was installed just below the blackstone coping, directly above the waterline. The light source is out of sight and well away from the water. A color wheel placed in front of the light source provides a spectrum of five colors.
BUSINESS
By Edmund L. Andrews and Edmund L. Andrews,New York Times News Service | May 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In a move that could greatly increase competition for many local telephone companies, the Federal Communications Commission proposed a rule yesterday that would force them to let rivals plug directly into local telephone systems.The proposal, which officials hope will be adopted within 12 months, will be a big help for the growing number of operators of high-speed fiber optics lines that bypass the traditional telephone system.These companies allow customers to reach their long-distance carriers at prices considerably lower than the access charges imposed by local telephone companies.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 17, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- For making possible the global phone network -- and with it 976 numbers, home-delivered Chinese food and "Larry King Live" -- the world owes copper wire a debt of gratitude.Copper wire, though inexpensive and ubiquitous, has had a klutzy reputation as a relatively crude transmission medium. It was expected to give way to snazzy, speedy and expensive fiber optics for the next communications revolution -- that of high-speed data exchanges between computers.But in recent years, spurred by research aimed at getting the most out of the world's millions of miles of existing telephone wire, copper has won new technological respect.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1997
Only three months after an initial public offering that made him worth more than $200 million, Ciena Corp. founder and chief scientist David R. Huber is leaving the Linthicum-based telecommunications equipment company to consider working on an encore.Ciena made the announcement last week, buried at the end of an announcement of a contract to supply its equipment to a start-up telephone company based in St. Louis. Yesterday, the company said Huber wanted to work on fiber optics research that is more basic than the refinements of existing products that Ciena is likely to focus on in the short term.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
Leasing office space in this economy can be a challenge, especially in older buildings, but Taylor Fields is working on getting an edge: a super-fast fiber-optic broadband connection. "One of the first things [prospective tenants] ask is what kind of Internet service we have," said Fields, a Timonium-based commercial leasing agent for the James F. Knott Realty Corp. "They all want fast Internet. " As work begins on a fiber-optic broadband network that will connect every Maryland school, hospital, police station — and even more public buildings — businesses also want to get involved.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2010
FiberLight LLC, a Georgia-based fiber-optic network provider, said Wednesday it will soon unveil a network that can connect commercial customers in downtown Baltimore and several southern suburbs to points in Washington and Northern Virginia. FiberLight operates 3,000 miles of fiber-optic networks across the country, but company officials said that the Baltimore-Washington region is its fastest-growing market. "It's a huge, growing market for us," said Judd Carothers, the company's executive vice president of network operations, engineering and construction.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2010
Workers are mapping Baltimore's underground telecommunications network, an effort that could help the city lure a billion-dollar project offering ultra-high-speed Internet connections to residents and businesses. Baltimore is one 1,100 communities to apply for the Google Fiber pilot project. On its website, Google Fiber recommends that applicants have a conduit system in place to lay the fiber optic cables. Winners are expected to be announced later this year. City workers have begun a survey of the city's 3.9 million-foot-long underground conduit system "using state-of-the-art GIS mapping technology," according to a statement from the office of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
Two months ago, city officials and business leaders were giddy with the notion that Baltimore maybe — just maybe — could lure Google Inc. to build a next-generation fiber-optic network for blazing-fast Internet service. On Wednesday, a larger group of city boosters wrestled with a more sobering possibility: What if Google doesn't choose Baltimore? More than 1,100 communities across the United States are vying for Google's Fiber for Communities pilot project. And Google isn't expected to announce a winner until the end of the year.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | March 12, 2010
Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake turned Thursday to civic leaders and athletic apparel maker Under Armour Inc. for help in luring a high-profile Google pilot project to Baltimore. She also appointed a "Google Czar" to spearhead the effort. Baltimore is one of many municipalities vying for Google's attention. The Mountain View, Calif., company recently launched a project called Google Fiber for Communities and plans to develop ultra-high-speed broadband networks in one or more locations across the nation.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | November 24, 2009
In an acquisition that will double its size, Ciena Corp. said Monday that it will buy the optical-networking assets of Nortel Networks Corp. for $769 million. The purchase - set to close in the first quarter next year - would make Linthicum-based Ciena the largest provider of fiber-optic networking gear in North America, and the third largest in the world. "This is a transformational deal, not just for Ciena, but for the industry," said Gary Smith, Ciena's president and chief executive officer.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | June 4, 1994
A seemingly harmless Northeast Baltimore brush fire ended up being more problematic for Marylanders last night as it burned a fiber optic cable and disrupted telephone service for thousands of MCI customers.The fire, which occurred about 9:10 p.m. near railroad tracks at Garrett Avenue and 25th Street, damaged an aerial cable that contained thousands of simultaneous relays, said Jim Collins, an MCI spokesman.As a result, MCI customers who attempted to place long-distance calls were often getting busy signals.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- AT&T has teamed up with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Digital Equipment Corp. to build a communications network far faster than current fiber optics.The experimental network, which is being built with an $8.4 million grant from the Pentagon and was announced yesterday, could make it far cheaper than with current fiber-optic technology to transmit television images, book-length computer files and even entire libraries in the blink of an eye.Local and long-distance companies already use fiber optics through much of their networks, making it possible to send up to 2.5 billion bits of data a second in the form of light pulses that fly down a single hair-thin strand of glass.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | November 24, 2009
In an acquisition that will double its size, Ciena Corp. said Monday that it will buy the optical-networking assets of Nortel Networks Corp. for $769 million. The purchase - set to close in the first quarter next year - would make Linthicum-based Ciena the largest provider of fiber-optic networking gear in North America, and the third largest in the world. "This is a transformational deal, not just for Ciena, but for the industry," said Gary Smith, Ciena's president and chief executive officer.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | May 25, 2009
A regional web of fiber-optic cable would spread from Maryland's Eastern Shore to its western mountains under a plan by local governments to tap federal stimulus money for communications expansions. If the effort is successful, it could mean $100 million or more flowing into Maryland, out of a $7.2 billion chunk of federal money set aside for fiber-optic projects. Working separately, two groups of local governments are working to snare their share of funds, which officials said could create networks that would be cheaper than buying the service from private companies.
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