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By Betsy Hornick and Betsy Hornick,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 5, 2001
When nutritionists discuss the benefits of whole grains, they usually mention fiber. But the latest research focuses on an array of vitamins, minerals and hundreds of phytochemicals found in whole-grain foods. "It's not to say that the fiber in whole grains doesn't still play an important part," says Joanne Slavin, a professor of nutrition and whole-grains researcher at the University of Minnesota. "But recent findings suggest that it's more than just fiber. In fact, it's the whole food - literally the whole grain."
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Baltimore was among dozens of disappointed cities when Google announced it had picked Kansas City, Mo., for a high-speed fiber-optic data network in 2011, but officials vowed to continue fighting for fiber nonetheless. Nearly four years later, some are disappointed by the lack of progress— and want to show that some of the fervor that wooed Google remains, waiting for new, affordable options for fast Internet service. A community group based in North Baltimore has attracted more than 900 people and nearly $17,000 in donations to a crowdsourced campaign, the Baltimore Broadband Coalition.
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FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 14, 1995
Are your kids eating enough fiber? Probably not.Food consumption surveys done by the U.S. Department of Agriculture show that American kids, like American adults, eat only half the fiber they need for good health.For children, dietary fiber is especially important to prevent constipation and reduce the risk of obesity, according to physician Christine L. Williams, in research published recently in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association to launch its multi-year Child Nutrition and Health Campaign.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
They are as well-versed in 3-D printing, weaving and the anthropology of fashion as they are in classic looks from Chanel and Dior. Students in the Maryland Institute College of Art s fibers program approach fashion from an unusual perspective. Although the college does not offer a traditional fashion design curriculum, graduates are creating inventive garments informed by education rooted in a sensual - and intellectual - understanding of textiles. "Fashion is a cultural force that relates to how we communicate ideas, values, fears and aspirations, our sense of belonging, and our ideas around gender and class," said fibers department chair Valeska Populoh.
FEATURES
By Medical Tribune News Service | April 28, 1992
Older Americans aren't asking where's the beef, but they aren't asking for fiber either, according to a study of eating habits of Americans aged 65 and older.From 1978 to 1988, the elderly ate less high-fat beef and pork and switched from white bread to whole-grain bread, University of North Carolina researchers reported.But while the elderly are making healthier menu choices, they still have not increased their consumption of high-fiber foods such as fruits, vegetables and cereal, study author Dr. Pamela S. Haines wrote in the current issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
NEWS
August 20, 1993
Did the Public Service Commission give the C&P Telephone Co. an extraordinarily favorable write-off of a huge pension obligation in order to help C&P pay for a fiber-optic network linking together every high school and college in Maryland?That's the impression left by the confluence of these two events. C&P's ratepayers, it appears, will indeed be footing a hefty portion of the bill for this statewide fiber-optic telecommunications system.That's not the way C&P is promoting this project, though.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 1997
Will eating carbohydrates fatten you up or trigger diabetes? It depends on the type and amount of carbohydrates you choose.New information from the Nurses' Health Study of 65,000 women shows those who ate the least cereal fiber and the most quickly digested carbohydrates like white bread, cola drinks and white rice were the most likely to develop diabetes. Those who chose the most cereal fiber and more slowly digested carbohydrates from yogurt and breakfast cereal had the lowest risks.The women's research echoed findings from a similar study in men. Together, they confirm the Food Guide Pyramid recommendation to base your eating habits on grain foods.
NEWS
August 17, 1993
By attempting to tip-toe around Maryland's normal procurement procedures, the governor's chief adviser on information technology finds himself in an awkward position: there's the appearance of a conflict of interest, even though Francis J. Knott may have done nothing wrong.We have little doubt Mr. Knott wants to do the right thing for his longtime friend, Gov. William Donald Schaefer. Mr. Knott seeks to propel Maryland into the vanguard of high-tech telecommunications, linking schools together via a controversial $40 million fiber-optic line built by C&P Telephone Co. The trouble is that Mr. Knott and Mr. Schaefer want to handle this matter as though it were a private-sector deal: negotiate an agreement with C&P and then build the fiber-optic network.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler and Karen Zeiler,Contributing Writer | November 4, 1994
Karin Birch first embraced fiber art six years ago with a whimsical painting she titled "Ode to Housework."She affixed tiny beads to the canvas in the shape of irons -- and rather fancied the results."
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | August 7, 1994
Q: This is a photo of a small green wicker rocker that was given to me as a child. It is about 62 years old and in good condition. What is its current value?A: Wicker is a term that encompasses a variety of natural fibers such as cane, rush, willow, rattan and reed. In 1917 Marshall B. Lloyd invented a loom that produced a man-made fiber. As a result, production was less costly and more efficient. After 1920 this technique was used to construct most wicker furniture. Your child's wicker rocker would probably be worth about $150 to $175 in mint condition.
NEWS
August 31, 2014
The 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 holds special significance for Baltimore in the next few weeks ( "More details announced for Star-Spangled Spectacular Celebration Aug. 12). On Aug. 25, 1814, President James Madison, and his wife Dolly were forced to flee for their lives when the British army sacked and burned the White House. The later attack on Fort McHenry led to the creation of the Star Spangled Banner, our national anthem. Why is so little attention being paid to this uniquely historic time?
NEWS
By Philip Spevak, Stan Wilson and Anthony Gill | July 1, 2014
There is a monopoly for fast Internet services in Baltimore City. As a consequence, a new Comcast customer can pay as much as $1,000 more over two years for standard "triple-play" service (telephone, Internet and cable television) than would a new customer in Annapolis, where competition exists. And the fastest Internet speed offered by Comcast in Baltimore is only one-third of what is currently available in Annapolis and most of the state. We pay more for less in Baltimore because fast fiber optic technology - often called fiber to the premises (FTTP)
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
A Massachusetts company building a high-speed fiber network has added a 270-mile segment into the Baltimore area, while the City of Westminster is launching a high-speed network of its own. Lightower Fiber Networks expanded its network to include Baltimore and parts of Baltimore, Howard and northern Anne Arundel counties, officials said Tuesday. The network extends to the Washington, D.C., area and Northern Virginia, connecting through Montgomery and Prince George's counties, as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014
Nineteen is a lucky number -- at least for MICA'S XIX: An Experimental Fashion Event. Senior fiber major Heyhee Choi is one of the 19 to be featured at the weekend event, along with 18 other artists and designers who make up MICA's fiber department's multimedia event class. The collection will include costumes, contemporary fashion, puppetry, performance and a traditional catwalk. Check out the designers' work at 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Saturday at 2640, 2640 St. Paul St. Tickets are $7 in advance (at store.mica.edu )
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
Hundreds of miles of new fiber-optic cable about as thick as a garden hose are lighting 21st-century ambitions from one end of Maryland to the other. Economic development officials imagine businesses opening or expanding thanks to more robust Internet connections. School administrators envision students using more electronic resources and foresee greater collaboration between schools. Some folks just look forward to dumping their dial-up modems. "We're providing a new highway system touching every area of the state," said Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, whose technology staff took a lead role in the Central Maryland portion of the statewide project called the One Maryland Broadband Network.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2012
Zayo Group announced Tuesday that it has acquired FiberGate Inc. and its network of fiber optic lines stretching from Northern Virginia to Baltimore. The $117 million purchase adds 399 new route miles and 130,000 fiber miles in the combined Washington, D.C./Baltimore metro areas to Zayo's network. FiberGate, based in Alexandria, Va., has been providing fiber optic services to the federal government, large enterprise and carrier customers for almost 17 years. "As a result of the acquisition, we will have one of the most comprehensive fiber networks in the D.C. area of any provider," said Dan Caruse, CEO of Colorado-based Zayo.
FEATURES
By Trish Hill and Trish Hill,N.Y. Times News Service | July 24, 1991
Theresa Jakubik, an aspiring actress in Manhattan, recently went to brunch with some people she wanted to impress. "I put on these adorable little culotte shorts," she said. But by the end of the day, she didn't look adorable. The rayon culottes were so wrinkled, she said, "I looked like I had rolled out of a 90-hour flight."It wrinkles, it's no bargain, it has to be dry-cleaned, it spots easily and trees die for its birth.This is the fabric of the 1990s?Rayon, once considered a second-class fabric to be used in lieu of silk, is showing up in every kind of clothing for both women and men. Designers talk ecstatically of its drapability, of the way it follows the line of the body.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | August 19, 2008
The Q: We've written a lot here about Verizon's fiber-optic video, voice and data services. Lots of people tell us how much they love it. Some people write to say they hate it, especially the problems they've had getting it installed properly. And some people, like reader Susan Gillette, just want to know when FiOS is coming to their neighborhood. "If you have written about why Verizon can cheerfully trumpet FiOS all over the airwaves but still doesn't have it in the city and won't say when it will be there, I missed the story," Gillette said.
HEALTH
By Deb Schulze, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Deb Schulze weighs in on fiber. With all the discussions about the health benefits of fiber, people wonder how much they need. Here are the daily recommendations from a leading research group, the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies: • For ages 50 and younger: Men should eat 38 grams and women 25 grams.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | July 27, 2011
Howard Magazine had a chance to talk with Rob Jungmann, the man behind Jungmaven T-shirts, while he was living for a few months in Ellicott City. Jungmann started making outdoor gear and apparel from industrial hemp in 1993 after graduating from Central Washington University. Jungmaven tees for men and women are sold at Liquid Blue Denim in Maple Lawn and at designer boutiques in New York, Japan and Europe. Q: What turned you on to industrial hemp as a clothing fiber? A: I had a professor in college in Washington.
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