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NEWS
June 11, 1997
EVERYTHING in recent British, Irish and Northern Ireland elections has gone right for Sinn Fein, the Irish Republican Army's political alter ego. The British Conservatives lost power. The Irish Republic's Prime Minister John Bruton, who rebuked Sinn Fein, tumbled out of power in the election last Friday. In Belfast, a Catholic and nationalist coalition of which Sinn Fein is part will run City Hall for the first time.For the IRA "military" group and Sinn Fein, this represents a high point.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 3, 1998
DUBLIN, Ireland -- At first glance, the agreement aimed at ending three decades of street warfare and other violence in Northern Ireland seems like a political winner here in the Republic of Ireland. In contrast to the North, where it is the subject of relentless and often vitriolic debate, in Ireland the accord has the support of every major political party.Who, after all, could object to peace?But while the agreement represents a momentous step in resolving one of this century's most persistent conflicts, government and other political figures in Ireland say they face a surprisingly daunting challenge in persuading the more than 2 million eligible voters to turn out on May 22, when it will be put to referendums here and in Northern Ireland.
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NEWS
May 16, 1997
IF IT WAS JUST THE ECONOMY, stupid, the right-of-center John Major would still be prime minister of Britain, and the slightly-left-of-center John Bruton would remain prime minister of Ireland. Polls suggest, however, that the June 6 election will hurl Mr. Bruton after Mr. Major to oblivion.There is no great issue between the normally ruling Fianna Fail Party and currently ruling Fine Gael Party. Their fundamental division is over the Irish Civil War of 1921-23. Both talk up free enterprise and protect state enterprise.
NEWS
April 17, 1998
THE NEXT OBSTACLE in the tortuous road to peace in Northern Ireland is twin referendums May 22. Simple majorities for the settlement in the province and in the Irish Republic are probable. That's not good enough.The key to making the settlement succeed would be a decisive majority in its favor among Protestant voters in Northern Ireland. Such an outcome is not assured. Protestants are a small majority of the people in Northern Ireland but a substantial majority of voters who turn out and who will elect the majorities to the new Northern Ireland Assembly for years.
NEWS
November 19, 1994
The theatrical political crisis in Dublin may slightly delay but will not upset the peace process in Northern Ireland, which all major parties in the Irish Republic favor. It does illustrate why Ulster Unionists reject the Republic, but its backlash may budge the Republic toward accommodating them.Since the 1992 election, Ireland has been governed by an uneasy coalition of the traditionalist Fianna Fail and secular-minded Labor parties. It was put together by Albert Reynolds, a canny old Fianna Fail leader, and Dick Spring, an ambitious young Labor leader.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 25, 1992
LONDON -- Ireland will vote today in a national election that nobody wanted -- and which is expected to provide only inconclusive results.None of the Irish political parties is expected to garner a clear majority in the 166-seat Dail, or parliament, so that a round of political horse-trading will be necessary for one of the two major parties to form a coalition government.And the process has been complicated by the decision to hold a simultaneous national referendum on liberalizing Ireland's tough anti-abortion constitutional provisions.
NEWS
December 21, 1994
The new coalition government of the Irish Republic, with John Bruton of the Fine Gael party as prime minister, has a better chance than its predecessor to move the peace process in Northern Ireland forward.The crucial stumbling block to progress now is the Ulster Unionist Party, representing the majority in Northern Ireland. The new leadership in Dublin has more standing than any previous Irish government to lure them into constructive engagement.What's interesting is the presence of the Democratic Left Party with two cabinet seats.
NEWS
February 7, 1992
Charles Haughey's resignation as prime minister of Ireland at 66 will end -- presumably -- a career often compared to Houdini for its escapes, or to cats for its successive lives.On Monday, Mr. Haughey will hand the resignation to young President Mary Robinson, a longtime adversary and political maverick. Cause of the downfall, ostensibly, was a retelling of an old scandal, the wiretapping of journalists in 1982 in search of a cabinet leak. But the real reason was an accumulation that includes scandals of alleged favoritism in state deals with the private sector and other matters.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 10, 1990
LONDON -- Mary Robinson, feminist and human rights activist, lawyer and mother, liberal politician in a conservative, Roman Catholic country, was elected the first female president of Ireland yesterday.Ms. Robinson, a Catholic married to a Protestant, favors decriminalizing homosexuality, legalizing divorce and providing greater accessibility to contraceptive devices and to information about abortion.Her improbable victory as in independent candidate in Wednesday'spresidential voting was declared yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
April 17, 1998
THE NEXT OBSTACLE in the tortuous road to peace in Northern Ireland is twin referendums May 22. Simple majorities for the settlement in the province and in the Irish Republic are probable. That's not good enough.The key to making the settlement succeed would be a decisive majority in its favor among Protestant voters in Northern Ireland. Such an outcome is not assured. Protestants are a small majority of the people in Northern Ireland but a substantial majority of voters who turn out and who will elect the majorities to the new Northern Ireland Assembly for years.
NEWS
June 11, 1997
EVERYTHING in recent British, Irish and Northern Ireland elections has gone right for Sinn Fein, the Irish Republican Army's political alter ego. The British Conservatives lost power. The Irish Republic's Prime Minister John Bruton, who rebuked Sinn Fein, tumbled out of power in the election last Friday. In Belfast, a Catholic and nationalist coalition of which Sinn Fein is part will run City Hall for the first time.For the IRA "military" group and Sinn Fein, this represents a high point.
NEWS
May 16, 1997
IF IT WAS JUST THE ECONOMY, stupid, the right-of-center John Major would still be prime minister of Britain, and the slightly-left-of-center John Bruton would remain prime minister of Ireland. Polls suggest, however, that the June 6 election will hurl Mr. Bruton after Mr. Major to oblivion.There is no great issue between the normally ruling Fianna Fail Party and currently ruling Fine Gael Party. Their fundamental division is over the Irish Civil War of 1921-23. Both talk up free enterprise and protect state enterprise.
NEWS
December 21, 1994
The new coalition government of the Irish Republic, with John Bruton of the Fine Gael party as prime minister, has a better chance than its predecessor to move the peace process in Northern Ireland forward.The crucial stumbling block to progress now is the Ulster Unionist Party, representing the majority in Northern Ireland. The new leadership in Dublin has more standing than any previous Irish government to lure them into constructive engagement.What's interesting is the presence of the Democratic Left Party with two cabinet seats.
NEWS
November 19, 1994
The theatrical political crisis in Dublin may slightly delay but will not upset the peace process in Northern Ireland, which all major parties in the Irish Republic favor. It does illustrate why Ulster Unionists reject the Republic, but its backlash may budge the Republic toward accommodating them.Since the 1992 election, Ireland has been governed by an uneasy coalition of the traditionalist Fianna Fail and secular-minded Labor parties. It was put together by Albert Reynolds, a canny old Fianna Fail leader, and Dick Spring, an ambitious young Labor leader.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 25, 1992
LONDON -- Ireland will vote today in a national election that nobody wanted -- and which is expected to provide only inconclusive results.None of the Irish political parties is expected to garner a clear majority in the 166-seat Dail, or parliament, so that a round of political horse-trading will be necessary for one of the two major parties to form a coalition government.And the process has been complicated by the decision to hold a simultaneous national referendum on liberalizing Ireland's tough anti-abortion constitutional provisions.
NEWS
November 24, 1992
Ireland's Labor Party, traditionally a vehicle for the respectable left, is the probable gainer from the muddled politics that will produce both an election to replace a broken coalition and a confusing referendum on abortion tomorrow. Of the four Irish mainstream political parties, Labor is the only one currently not in public disfavor. Its leader, Dick Spring, towers above his rivals in the polls.The referendum is on three constitutional amendments that would prohibit abortion in nearly all circumstances but permit freedom of travel abroad to get information about abortion.
NEWS
November 16, 1990
Irish voters have destroyed forever certain stereotypes, notably their own, about the Irish Republic. They have elected as president a mother of three who is also a crusader for contraception and divorce and, additionally, a lecturer on European Community law. The presidency is ceremonial, but symbol often counts for more than substance in Irish politics and Anglo-Irish relations. The Irish have finally got a president who can look the British sovereign and prime minister in the eye and not blink, and do the same to an Irish cardinal.
NEWS
November 24, 1992
Ireland's Labor Party, traditionally a vehicle for the respectable left, is the probable gainer from the muddled politics that will produce both an election to replace a broken coalition and a confusing referendum on abortion tomorrow. Of the four Irish mainstream political parties, Labor is the only one currently not in public disfavor. Its leader, Dick Spring, towers above his rivals in the polls.The referendum is on three constitutional amendments that would prohibit abortion in nearly all circumstances but permit freedom of travel abroad to get information about abortion.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | February 24, 1992
London. -- If hope had not been dashed so often before, one might think this a hopeful moment in the long grief of Anglo-Irish ++ relations. There is a new Irish prime minister as well as a new president. There is a changed government in London. The violence in Northern Ireland is the worst in years and must be addressed. The killing, by British soldiers, of four more IRA men last week, who were attacking a police station, has provoked new trouble between young republican sympathizers and the police in Belfast.
NEWS
February 7, 1992
Charles Haughey's resignation as prime minister of Ireland at 66 will end -- presumably -- a career often compared to Houdini for its escapes, or to cats for its successive lives.On Monday, Mr. Haughey will hand the resignation to young President Mary Robinson, a longtime adversary and political maverick. Cause of the downfall, ostensibly, was a retelling of an old scandal, the wiretapping of journalists in 1982 in search of a cabinet leak. But the real reason was an accumulation that includes scandals of alleged favoritism in state deals with the private sector and other matters.
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