Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFez
IN THE NEWS

Fez

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 21, 1997
CAIRO, Egypt -- In a dusty storefront on the Street of the Tentmakers, Muhammad al Tarabishi unsnaps the locks on a worn leather hatbox. He lifts the cover to reveal a flat-topped cone of maroon felt. The tarbush, or fez, worn by his grandfather who opened this shop a century ago, is more than an heirloom.It is a relic of a bygone age, a cultural icon with a colorful political past. Once favored by pashas and policemen, this brimless hat with the black silk tassel commanded respect for its wearer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Phil Marty and Phil Marty,Chicago Tribune | January 21, 2007
MARRAKECH, Morocco -- Morocco sits at the northwest tip of the African continent, stretching within just 9 miles of Europe. But, as our train between the cities of Rabat and Marrakech passes a dusty, ancient-looking village that seems as if it could crumble in an instant, I think that culturally, this country and Spain, its nearest neighbor on the Continent, might as well be 9,000 miles apart. Or not. Step off the ferry in Tangier, Morocco, and you might at first think you're still in Algeciras, Spain, where the ferry left an hour and a half ago. Though you'll see a few residents in the port wearing the traditional garb of long, flowing djellaba and perhaps a tight-fitting cap for men and a head covering for women, most are running around in jeans, sweaters or shirts, cell phones pasted to their ears.
Advertisement
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 22, 1995
FEZ, Morocco -- In the Middle East it still matters what you wear on your head. The Sudanese have floppy turbans, the Palestinians red and black checkered kaffiyehs and the Saudis the white ghutra.But the maroon, brimless fez, once the epitome of Old World courtesy and taste, has become, for most Muslims, politically incorrect."It's a hat of the oppressors," said Abdel Jouad, 26. "This is why no one wears it anymore."Only the Moroccan royal court has resisted the Muslim world's onslaught against the fez. King Hassan II is the only Arab leader to wear it. And Cabinet ministers, the royal guard and the palace staff all sport the fez, although the staff members wear a floppy, conical-shaped fez that denotes their status.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 6, 2005
CAIRO - For the past several weeks, during the first contested presidential election campaign they have ever known, Egyptians have witnessed a remarkable makeover of their long-serving president, Hosni Mubarak. The long-unchallenged leader of a government that has jailed and tortured its critics, Mubarak for the past 19 days has been ridiculed by political opponents and a previously fawning press. The president, in a series of well-choreographed campaign stops, has recast his image from that of an unapproachable modern pharaoh to a warmer, life-size politician who hugs peasants as well as professors, sips tea with penniless farmers and confesses that he "feels their pain."
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2005
The vehicles rolling down Pratt Street yesterday were much tinier than usual. For about four hours yesterday, the Inner Harbor was transformed by a colorful parade of all things great and small about the Shriners, from the Mason group's trademark miniature cars and motorcycles to a larger-than-life walking, waving velvet fez that hugged children in the crowd of about 25,000 lining the street. "Everybody loves a parade," said Raoul L. Frevel Sr., Imperial Potentate (head of all heads) of the Shriners.
TRAVEL
By Phil Marty and Phil Marty,Chicago Tribune | January 21, 2007
MARRAKECH, Morocco -- Morocco sits at the northwest tip of the African continent, stretching within just 9 miles of Europe. But, as our train between the cities of Rabat and Marrakech passes a dusty, ancient-looking village that seems as if it could crumble in an instant, I think that culturally, this country and Spain, its nearest neighbor on the Continent, might as well be 9,000 miles apart. Or not. Step off the ferry in Tangier, Morocco, and you might at first think you're still in Algeciras, Spain, where the ferry left an hour and a half ago. Though you'll see a few residents in the port wearing the traditional garb of long, flowing djellaba and perhaps a tight-fitting cap for men and a head covering for women, most are running around in jeans, sweaters or shirts, cell phones pasted to their ears.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 15, 1991
The masterpieces of early opera are essentially sung plays that must be brought to life by words and the accouterments of staging rather than by beautiful singing.Saturday's cast for Francesco Cavalli's "Ormindo" (1644) at the Peabody Conservatory of Music was not generally outstanding in vocal terms but the performance was an unqualified success.In less than discerning hands, this opera -- which recounts the adventures of Ormindo, the Prince of Tunis, who loves Erisbe, the wife of the elderly Ariadeno, King of Fez -- can seem pretty light stuff.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2005
They are men. Their average age is about 65. And their signature trademarks are a fez -- a red hat with a tassel -- and the tiny cars they drive in parades. More than 20,000 members of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Masons better known as the Shriners, are converging on Baltimore for their first national convention here since 1939. At least 18 hotels from Timonium to Baltimore-Washington International Airport are booked for the weeklong event that opens with a public ceremony Sunday and could bring the city up to $24 million in revenue.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 6, 2005
CAIRO - For the past several weeks, during the first contested presidential election campaign they have ever known, Egyptians have witnessed a remarkable makeover of their long-serving president, Hosni Mubarak. The long-unchallenged leader of a government that has jailed and tortured its critics, Mubarak for the past 19 days has been ridiculed by political opponents and a previously fawning press. The president, in a series of well-choreographed campaign stops, has recast his image from that of an unapproachable modern pharaoh to a warmer, life-size politician who hugs peasants as well as professors, sips tea with penniless farmers and confesses that he "feels their pain."
NEWS
By Sebastian Rotella and Sebastian Rotella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 2003
MADRID, Spain - Moroccan authorities announced the indictment of six more suspects yesterday in this month's suicide bombings in Casablanca, a case that has taken an unexpected twist with the death in custody of a chief suspect. Authorities provided new details about the dead man, who allegedly organized the synchronized attacks that killed 43 people May 16. The 30-year-old suspect, owner of a small shoe store in Fez, had been ill with chronic heart problems and a severely enlarged liver caused by medication, officials said.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2005
The vehicles rolling down Pratt Street yesterday were much tinier than usual. For about four hours yesterday, the Inner Harbor was transformed by a colorful parade of all things great and small about the Shriners, from the Mason group's trademark miniature cars and motorcycles to a larger-than-life walking, waving velvet fez that hugged children in the crowd of about 25,000 lining the street. "Everybody loves a parade," said Raoul L. Frevel Sr., Imperial Potentate (head of all heads) of the Shriners.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2005
They are men. Their average age is about 65. And their signature trademarks are a fez -- a red hat with a tassel -- and the tiny cars they drive in parades. More than 20,000 members of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Masons better known as the Shriners, are converging on Baltimore for their first national convention here since 1939. At least 18 hotels from Timonium to Baltimore-Washington International Airport are booked for the weeklong event that opens with a public ceremony Sunday and could bring the city up to $24 million in revenue.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 21, 1997
CAIRO, Egypt -- In a dusty storefront on the Street of the Tentmakers, Muhammad al Tarabishi unsnaps the locks on a worn leather hatbox. He lifts the cover to reveal a flat-topped cone of maroon felt. The tarbush, or fez, worn by his grandfather who opened this shop a century ago, is more than an heirloom.It is a relic of a bygone age, a cultural icon with a colorful political past. Once favored by pashas and policemen, this brimless hat with the black silk tassel commanded respect for its wearer.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 22, 1995
FEZ, Morocco -- In the Middle East it still matters what you wear on your head. The Sudanese have floppy turbans, the Palestinians red and black checkered kaffiyehs and the Saudis the white ghutra.But the maroon, brimless fez, once the epitome of Old World courtesy and taste, has become, for most Muslims, politically incorrect."It's a hat of the oppressors," said Abdel Jouad, 26. "This is why no one wears it anymore."Only the Moroccan royal court has resisted the Muslim world's onslaught against the fez. King Hassan II is the only Arab leader to wear it. And Cabinet ministers, the royal guard and the palace staff all sport the fez, although the staff members wear a floppy, conical-shaped fez that denotes their status.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 15, 1991
The masterpieces of early opera are essentially sung plays that must be brought to life by words and the accouterments of staging rather than by beautiful singing.Saturday's cast for Francesco Cavalli's "Ormindo" (1644) at the Peabody Conservatory of Music was not generally outstanding in vocal terms but the performance was an unqualified success.In less than discerning hands, this opera -- which recounts the adventures of Ormindo, the Prince of Tunis, who loves Erisbe, the wife of the elderly Ariadeno, King of Fez -- can seem pretty light stuff.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Morris and Mike Morris,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2003
Comedian David Wain is hoping to break away from the "Seinfeld mold" of "cookie-cutter stand-up comedy" when he and fellow comedians Michael Ian Black and Michael Showalter perform Sunday at the Ottobar. The trio -- who worked on the early-'90s MTV series The State and 2001's critically acclaimed summer camp spoof Wet Hot American Summer -- aim to introduce Charm City to its brand of alternative comedy with their improv group Stella. Don't expect typical stand-up comedy from these guys.
FEATURES
By Lisa Lytle and Lisa Lytle,Orange County Register | August 5, 1992
They look like typical men's work and weekend clothes. Touch them, wear them, even swing on a flying trapeze in them -- they'll feel almost as comfy as workout clothes. The secret: a stretch fiber called spandex.Andrew Fezza, Michael Kors, Jhane Barnes, Robert Amerigo, Sabato Russo and the Falke Group's Niels Bastrup are among the designers stretching clothes to the limit for fall.Spandex -- best known as the brand name Lycra -- has been around in men's athletic clothes for years, but not until this year have designers given it new life in sport coats, sweaters, suit trousers and casual shirts.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.