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October 6, 2009
After a paradoxical 2009, the Orioles enter this offseason in a curious position. They equaled their worst win-loss record in 20 years and trailed only the infamous 1988 season and the inaugural 1954 campaign as most futile in the club's modern history. Yet, there is a sense that the future has promise because of the emergence of young starting pitchers Brian Matusz (right), Chris Tillman and Brad Bergesen, catcher Matt Wieters and outfielders Nolan Reimold and Felix Pie. It can be argued that the Orioles have fewer holes to fill for 2010 than they have had entering an offseason in recent memory.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Ahead of new rules requiring chain restaurants to post calorie counts for their menu items, some of the restaurants are voluntarily introducing lower calorie selections. The new items tend to be salads rather than the main attractions such as burgers and pizza, but they contain an average of 60 fewer calories or a reduction of 12 percent, researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found. The researchers looked at new menu items in 2012 and 2013, ahead of new rules to offer the public nutritional information required by the Affordable Care Act. And they said the results, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, could be the beginning of a trend in calorie reduction at fast food restaurants that aids the obesity epidemic.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | November 24, 2007
Baltimore police are arresting fewer people than they have in years past, according to a recently released report, but almost 1,600 drug arrests in the first eight months of this year could not be prosecuted for lack of evidence. The decrease in arrests - 7,500 fewer through August compared with the corresponding period last year - provides evidence for what police officials have been saying: that they have stepped away from "zero-tolerance" policing. Jailing people for minor offenses that didn't result in criminal charges clogged the city jail and led to criticism and lawsuits.
NEWS
By Paul Marx | September 11, 2014
When it comes to policing, in some places less is better than more. Fewer police departments can result in better protection and better service. In places like Ferguson, Mo., hostility toward the police would be far less likely if the parent St. Louis County had fewer police departments - or even better, only one. County governments have evolved over time by a variety of ways, with a tendency toward more centralization. The particular form local government takes matters a great deal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Barry and Dan Barry,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 2, 2003
NEW YORK - This past Tuesday, the sun arced across a cloudless sky, the breath of fall rustled trees, and the number of people killed in the World Trade Center disaster dropped by 40. Just like that: Forty fewer souls to imagine rising from the dust; 40 fewer people to include in nightly prayers. Until now, the number of dead was 2,792. That number, 2,792, stood firm for more than a year. It was the number recorded in almanacs and history books. It was the number of the names of trade center victims that children uttered at September's second-anniversary ceremony.
SPORTS
September 11, 1999
Athletics: Tim Hudson has gone at least seven innings 11 times, allowed two runs or fewer 11 times and struck out seven or more nine times in 18 major-league starts.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1990
When asked by The Evening Sun whether they think young people starting their first jobs are well prepared or poorly trained, most callers to SUNDIAL said they believed workers had fewer skills.Of 231 callers, 139 said they believe high school graduates have fewer basic skills than in years past. Forty-six callers said they believe new workers are better prepared, and 46 said they believe the skill level is about the same.When asked about college students entering the work force, 100 said they have fewer skills, 71 said they are better prepared, and 58 said about the same.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | January 30, 2007
Ken Sander of York, Pa., admits it might be selective memory, "but ... it seems to me the Mid-Atlantic is having fewer nor'easters than 30-40 years ago. ... Has the storm track shifted?" The University of Virginia's nor'easter expert, Robert E. Davis, says these powerful winter storms have become fewer, but more severe. In years like this one, more storms take an inland, "continental" route. In other years, more rake the coastline as nor'easters, clobbering us and New England. Davis sees no clear trend either way.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | December 8, 2002
1. Shockey factor In Week11, Giants tight end Jeremy Shockey torched the Redskins for 11 catches and 111 yards. Shockey leads all tight ends in receptions (49) and is second in receiving yards (563) to Tony Gonzalez (577) of the Kansas City Chiefs. He will test the linebacking corps of Jessie Armstead, LaVar Arrington and Kevin Mitchell. 2. Start fast, end strong The Giants have outscored their opponents 33-9 in the first quarter. But then they taper off, scoring just 53 points in the fourth compared with their opponents' 95. A solid beginning hasn't been Washington's forte, as opponents are outscoring the Redskins 61-33 in the first quarter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | December 20, 2009
I n 2009, Baltimore's theatrical larder was, if not exactly bare, then less full and tempting than it usually is. Local troupes economized by staging fewer shows with safer and less challenging fare. Subscription series at both the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center and Rep Stage in Howard County were cut by one, and for the first time in several years, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival didn't mount a major fall production. In addition, duplication abounded. The Baltimore Shakespeare Festival and Rep Stage mounted identically cast productions of "Wittenberg" in June and August, and there were other examples.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
In the first month of Baltimore's tough new youth curfew, about four kids a night were picked up by police - a smaller-than-expected number that supporters say shows the law is working. City officials say the figures - which show that police issued 120 curfew violations in the program's first 30 days - indicate that parents and children have gotten the message that young people need to be inside at night. "The message has gotten out," said City Councilman Brandon M. Scott, who sponsored the curfew bill.
NEWS
May 24, 2014
Republican Ron George releases the first commercial in his campaign for governor, an introductory spot that also chronicles his opposition to tax increases. What the ad says : George a two-term state delegate from Anne Arundel County, is shown with family members and at a jewelry store he owns in Annapolis. In one frame, he is with former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who is raising an arm and smiling, though Ehrlich has not endorsed anyone in the race for governor. "He did not aspire to be in government, but when his community called, he stepped up to the plate," a voice-over says.
NEWS
May 5, 2014
It should be no surprise that the 26th Street landslide happened ( "Displaced residents blame city, railroad for inaction," May 2). Landslides occur after heavy rain and deterioration of the land. With over 3 inches of rain and a road that has had very little done to fix safety issues, this should come as no surprise. It was the perfect mix for an urban landslide like this one to occur. The fact that nobody was hurt was a good thing. However, something very alarming came from this.
NEWS
By Justin George and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
A tentative agreement between Baltimore and its police union would cut vacant positions from the department while raising officer pay, a shift intended to stop officers from leaving for better-paying agencies. The proposed three-year contract marks a sweeping change for an agency that has struggled with vacancies as it lags behind nearby Baltimore and Howard counties in officer pay. Police also said the deal would shift many more officers to patrol units and put more officers on the streets.
NEWS
By Justin George and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Homicides in Baltimore reached their lowest monthly total in three decades in March, a stark turnaround that police cautiously attributed to better patrols and intelligence-sharing after a bloody start to the year. Seven people were killed in March, the lowest monthly total since June 1983. The city has recorded fewer than 10 killings in a month just four times since 1970. March ended on an ominous note — with five shootings Monday, including one man who died after walking into a hospital with gunshot wounds.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Towson holds a 37-17 advantage in its series with Delaware and has won five of the last seven meetings with its Colonial Athletic Association foe. Eight of the last 14 contests in this rivalry have been decided by two goals or less, and the Tigers are 6-2 in those games. Delaware (5-3 overall and 0-1 in the conference) had a four-game winning streak in Saturday's 11-9 loss to Hofstra. Conor Peaks, who replaced then-junior Chris Herbert and started the final started the final seven games of 2013, has started all eight contests thus far. Peaks, a sophomore, has posted a 8.13 goals-against average and a .596 save percentage.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
If the current trend continues, Baltimore County could see crime decline for the second consecutive year, according to an analysis of Police Department data for the first six months of this year. From January to June, overall crime dropped nearly 6 percent compared with the corresponding period a year ago, including 34 fewer rapes, 67 fewer robberies and 449 fewer burglaries, the data show. "We feel some comfort when we see across-the-board declines, especially since our population was increasing during that time," said Chief Terrence B. Sheridan.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
Lockheed Martin Corp. reported yesterday that its profit tripled in the second quarter, despite fewer sales of fighter planes, rockets and other of its signature products. The Bethesda-based defense giant also said it expects income growth to continue, predicting an earnings increase of 30 percent to 35 percent for the year. "They've done what they said they would do - reduce debt, divest divisions - and it has worked," said Paul H. Nisbet, an aerospace analyst for JSA Research Inc. Lockheed Martin earned $144 million, or 33 cents a share, in the second quarter, compared with $42 million, or 11 cents a share, posted for the second quarter of 2000.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
I want to prune branches out of a tree so the wind will blow through it and it won't fall on my house. Is that possible? The answer is actually counterintuitive. One would think fewer branches would offer less wind resistance, but time lapse photography has shown that wind does not have the same effect on a tree as on a solid surface, where the wind pushes fairly evenly over the entire object. With a tree, wind hits different branches at different moments, causing some to bend with the wind while others are springing back.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | February 27, 2014
SARASOTA, FLA. - For the players who don't already have their ticket punched for the 25-man major league roster, spring training is about to get real. The Orioles open the Grapefruit League exhibition season Friday against the Tampa Bay Rays in nearby Port Charlotte, and the competition for a small handful of open major league jobs begins in earnest. Of course, manager Buck Showalter would tell you that it's been real for a month now, since just about everything everybody has been doing down here since the four-day January mini-camp is observed and evaluated.
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