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NEWS
March 8, 2011
Thanks to a brief article published in The Sun several weeks ago, I found out about and attended a wonderful reunion of the Baltimore Colts on March 6 at Martin's West. Former Colts Bruce Laird, Lydell Mitchell and their helpers organized a reunion of the 1975-77 Colts that formed one of the most exciting teams we've ever had. Led by Bert Jones, they won their division three years in a row and created a fever that lasts to this day. More than 600 fans and guests attended the bull and oyster roast, sang the Colts fight song, lined up for autographs and reveled in the highlights projected on giant screens.
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SPORTS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Friday presented perfect weather for a doubleheader between the Orioles and rival New York Yankees, and a chance for the Orioles to build on their lead in the bid for a division crown. Yet as fans filed into a sun-filled Oriole Park at Camden Yards at noontime, a cloud also rolled in with word of infielder Chris Davis' 25-game suspension by Major League Baseball. He tested positive for a banned amphetamine. "I'm so disappointed," said Gary Martin, a 55-year-old from Annapolis who came to the early game of the doubleheader with his wife, Trisha.
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NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2005
How long do the fatigue and "brain fog" last after general anesthesia for surgery? It depends - on your age, the specific drugs used, how long the surgery took and how healthy you were to start with. These days, most general anesthesia is short-acting, which means you wake up quickly and the drugs are mostly out of your system within a few hours, said Dr. Carl Rosow, an anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. But tiny amounts can linger for up to seven days - enough so that you may not feel completely normal, especially if you also have a drink or two. Moreover, if you are one of the unlucky 20 percent to 40 percent of patients who have nausea and vomiting after general anesthesia, that can add considerably to your recovery time because of dehydration and weakness from not eating, said Dr. John Ulatowski, director and chair of the department of anesthesia and critical care at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
It's hard to believe something this wonderful got lost in the insanity of Maryland officially joining the Big Ten, but it did, and for that I apologize. Former Oriole Nate McLouth, a Michigan native whose allegiance falls with the Maize and Blue squared off with the Michigan State mascot on Monday. The Big Ten mascots celebrated Maryland joining the league at Nationals Park in Washington. McLouth donned a Michigan helmet and flexed hard alongside the Spartan. It's hard for mascots to look menacing, but it's also pretty difficult for Nate McLouth to look menacing, so I'm not sure I believe the animous is real.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
Let the squealing begin. One frenzied Justin Bieber fan from Baltimore — and are there any other kind? — will get a chance on Friday to win a trip to Los Angeles to attend the Feb. 9 premiere of the boy wonder's new movie. A singing contest will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday at the Hard Rock Café , 601 E. Pratt St. Fifty teen-aged fans will be selected to sing one of Justin's signature songs — "Baby", "Never Say Never" or "U Smile" for a panel of three judges.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Emiline D. Lazzeri, a Baltimore County native who as a child lived for a year in a glass-encased room at Johns Hopkins Hospital while being treated for rheumatic fever , died of congestive heart failure March 14 at her home in Largo, Fla. She was 80. Born Emiline Phillips, she grew up across the city line in Baltimore County's Jones Creek neighborhood and graduated from Sparrows Point High School. Her childhood was marked by a rare illness she developed at age 6. In attempts to diagnose the illness, she became a fixture at Baltimore's most famous medical institution for one year and linked to one of its most renowned doctors forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 2, 1997
Joy Ehrlich will star in the Baltimore premiere of Wallace Shawn's one-person show, "The Fever," at the Theatre Project for two weeks beginning Wednesday. The Obie Award-winning play, which debuted at the New York Shakespeare Festival in 1990 starring the author, traces the personal impact of a native New Yorker's travels through the war-torn Third World.The Theatre Project's production is directed by John Malpede, a Los Angeles-based director who is also a solo performer. Ehrlich, a Baltimore native, recently returned from 2 1/2 years of theater work and studies in the Netherlands.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
A 61-year-old man with a high fever was rescued Tuesday evening from a 957-foot tanker ship anchored near Annapolis, U.S. Coast Guard officials said. The captain of the Cape Althea contacted Coast Guard officials about 5 p.m. reporting he had a 104-degree fever, and Anne Arundel County Fire Department personnel helped retrieve the man via a 45-foot rescue boat to a medical center, officials said. "Since the Cape Althea was at anchor and the crew from Anne Arundel County Fire and Rescue has an advanced capability to aid medically, we asked them to assist," said Chief Petty Officer Eddie McCrae, supervisor of the Coast Guard Sector Baltimore Command Center, in a statement.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun Staff Report | April 1, 2011
Brooks Robinson is resting comfortably at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, he said in a statement Friday. The Orioles' Hall of Fame third baseman was admitted earlier in the week when he developed an infection and fever. "I had a successful procedure yesterday to relieve the symptoms of the infection," Robinson said, according to the news release. "The doctors are optimistic that the inflammation and infection will be completely cleared by the end of the weekend and they can move forward with my originally scheduled routine procedure early next week.
EXPLORE
July 4, 2012
An article from the July 5, 1962, edition of the Herald Argus and Baltimore Countian reported on the consequences of being bitten by a tick for one area youngster. A case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever was reported in a five-year-old male residing in the southeastern section of the county during the week ended June 29, according to Dr. William H. F. Warthen , County Health Officer. The child is hospitalized and a complete epidemiological investigation is being made in order to determine the cause of the infection.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Like many Maryland graduates, Stan Gelbaugh wasn't thrilled when the school announced nearly 20 months ago that it was going to be moving from the Atlantic Coast Conference to the Big Ten. The former Terps quarterback, who was a part of three straight ACC championship football teams from 1983 through 1985, also knew he had little choice but to accept the decision. Even Monday, as he joined a couple of hundred alums, administrators and fans at the Under Armour Brand House in Harbor East to celebrate Maryland officially joining the Big Ten on Tuesday, Gelbaugh seemed to be more resigned to the change than rejoicing about it. "I think it's going to happen," Gelbaugh said hesitantly, when asked for his feelings about the move.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 7, 2014
If it is really April, why does everything in the garden look so dead? You are going to hear that a lot this month. Gardeners and non-gardeners alike, trapped by cold and snow for months, have rushed outdoors to find so much looking so brown. It might not be dead, just burned, damaged by the terrible cold of this winter, the coldest in Baltimore in 30 years. Wait through May and even into June for signs of new growth before you give up on your garden. There may be life in there yet. Winter burn is just one of the problems we gardeners will face during this late spring.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
You can't see the Higgs boson, but you can watch its discovery. Scientists crowd around dozens of monitors as they collect data from experiments using a looping 17-mile underground tunnel and equipment likened to a five-story Swiss watch. They worry what the media might say if tests fail, and wonder whether the experiment should have been conducted in secret. And they clamor for a seat in the auditorium where physicists will present their findings in the hunt for the elusive "God particle," a subatomic building block that existed only in theory, but had never been detected.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
I really think it's time my 12-year-old son took the white crayon from the window sill. As kids everywhere know, if you want a snow day from school, put the white crayon by the window and turn your pajamas inside out. This year, the superstitions worked beautifully. The schools have now run out of snow days and I've run out of patience. Don't misunderstand me. I love snow and the way it brightens up the dark and dreary winter landscape. And now that I'm a college professor, I, too, get snow days off from teaching.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 17, 2013
As some in Congress groped for a way to avert economic Armaggedon, House Republicans continued to chase their mirage -- the repeal or defunding of "Obamacare" -- at the expense of the nation's much more serious problems. This blatantly partisan attempt to bury President Barack Obama's singular legislative achievement has now wasted a year or more of time. The Party of Lincoln could have, and should have, devoted itself to addressing the critical national task of putting the jobless back to work.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | July 22, 2013
Men's soccer Goalie scores winner as Bohemians rally, secure first-ever playoff spot Goalkeeper Zach Kane (Loyola University, Perry Hall) scored the game-winning goal in the 94th minute, and the Baltimore Bohemians secured the first Premier Development League playoff bid in program history, defeating the host Ocean City (N.J.) Nor'easters, 3-2, in a comeback victory Sunday. After being sent to the offensive end in a desperation move, Kane headed in a 40-yard free kick.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | April 28, 2002
Q. I am a pediatrician concerned about parents' use of two over-the-counter medications. I often feel like a one-woman army trying to combat simultaneous use of acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Motrin, etc.) for children with fever. Parents sometimes alternate doses as often as every two hours. Some parents are giving these medications together to bring down a fever. Clearly, fever is a physiologic function that helps the body fight infections. I try to educate parents about this, but there seems to be an almost irrational fear of fever in our culture.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, who has thyroid cancer, developed a fever yesterday and was taken to a Virginia hospital "for evaluation," a Supreme Court spokesman said. He was allowed to go home after undergoing tests at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, said spokesman Ed Turner. It was the second time this summer that the 80-year chief justice has gone to the hospital complaining of a fever. In mid-July, he was hospitalized for two days for what officials described as observation and tests.
SPORTS
By Mark Giannotto, The Washington Post | June 17, 2013
Crystal Langhorne (Maryland) scored all 16 of her points in the second half and had nine rebounds as the Washington Mystics rallied to upend the defending WNBA champion Indiana Fever, 64-60, on Sunday afternoon. It was Washington's third straight win and marked the second time the team has started a season with wins in four of its first five games. Washington went a league-worst 5-29 last season. Indiana (1-5) pulled ahead by four when it closed the third quarter on a 7-0 run. But forwards Michelle Snow and Langhorne ensured the Fever suffered its fifth straight defeat, combining for 14 of Washington's final 18 points.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 12, 2013
This time, I'm with Santoni. That is to say, I agree with Bob Santoni, the outspoken owner of the Baltimore supermarket that bears his family's name, that some members of the brain trust running our fair city have stepped through the looking glass. "They live in a fantasy world down at City Hall," Santoni said when asked about the latest scheme to nickel and dime people who live and work in Baltimore — a proposal by a young city councilman to impose a 10-cent fee for every plastic bag provided in a retail establishment.
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