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By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 29, 1995
Boston -- If you want to freeze-frame a single image for the Abortion '95 Yearbook, try this one: A close-up of Sen. Robert Smith and his pink plastic fetus.For a few extraordinary minutes during the Senate's roughshod ride over Dr. Henry Foster, the New Hampshire Republican offered an inflammatory diatribe.With the fetus doll in one hand, and illustrations in the background, he ranted about ''partial birth abortions.''This had about as much to do with Henry Foster as anything else that happened in the final days when the doctor's nomination and reputation became a ping-pong ball in the presidential ego match between candidates Bob Dole and Phil Gramm.
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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | November 11, 1992
A former resident at Maryland General Hospital has filed a $15 million slander suit charging the hospital's chief of obstetrics and gynecology with falsely accusing him of throwing away a fetus to cover up a botched abortion."
NEWS
By George F. Will NTC | November 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Ho-hum. It is becoming the sort of story that no longer rates much notice as news. The New York Times accorded it seven paragraphs at the bottom of an inside page, beneath this headline:Girl, 15, Accused of Letting Her Daughter Drown at BirthThis is another case of a newborn baby consigned to the garbage, like the one whose brief life began and ended in a Delaware motel room last November, when the baby's parents, both college students, were...
NEWS
By JULIE DEARDORFF and JULIE DEARDORFF,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 11, 2006
Expectant moms can enhance bonding with their unborn baby by spending a few extra minutes gazing at the fetus' tiny features and gestures during a prenatal ultrasound examination, according to new research. "Women are really affected not only by seeing the face, arms and legs but by the physical movement," said psychologist Zachariah Boukydis, lead author of the study. The research showed spending an average of six to seven additional minutes on ultrasounds can strengthen the maternal-fetal connection.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | April 23, 2007
WASHINGTON -- From the clamor following the Supreme Court's ruling to ban partial-birth abortion, one might assume that American women have been robbed of choice. In fact, women can still render themselves unpregnant, in the vernacular of choice-speak, by several means. They can "disarticulate the fetus" and even "reduce" or "separate the fetal calvarium." If the vocabulary is confusing, that's the point. Using Orwellian language to sanitize the issue, so to speak, is a time-honored tactic of the "pro-choice" arbiters.
NEWS
June 2, 2010
How times have changed. Only a few short years ago President George W. Bush called for a Sanctity of Life Day that has now been replaced by President Barack Obama with the anti-Christian Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month (June). At least we can say one thing about President Obama. He is consistent. He always takes the side that is short-sighted, harmful to individuals and society and focused on self. He sides with those demanding that the innocent (i.e. the human fetus and embryo)
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
As early as today, the U.S. Senate will vote on whether to ban "partial-birth" abortions. To do so, it must join the House of Representatives in overriding a veto by President Clinton. But even if the Senate approves the ban, it is unlikely to end abortions performed in the late stages of pregnancy.A congressional ban would end one particular procedure that voices on both sides of the abortion debate agree is the most gruesome and distasteful of all methods used to end pregnancies.In this method, the fetus is usually delivered feet first until all but its head has emerged.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 26, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The new wave of bans on certain late-term abortions -- laws that exist in nearly identical form in 31 states -- appeared to be in constitutional trouble in the Supreme Court yesterday. Justices who remain from the coalition that last upheld abortion rights eight years ago, along with newer justices, questioned the breadth of a Nebraska law. Their skepticism put in doubt the constitutionality of similar laws in other states and nearing passage in Congress. Maryland has no such law. As the justices held a hearing on their first abortion-rights case since 1992, protesters from both sides of the issue milled around noisily on the court's front sidewalk.
NEWS
By Jeff Griffith | September 20, 1992
Last Friday, I had an unexpected but pleasant surprise.My friend Jo -- the names have been changed to protect the innocent -- stopped in for a visit. She wanted to tell me that my interpretation of a certain bumper sticker is all wrong.I listened to her.She listened to me.We treated each other with respect.And we agreed to disagree.When Jo left, we hugged each other and promised to talk some more. I felt good about Jo's visit and I'm sure Jo did, too.Jo considers herself "pro-life."I consider myself "pro-choice."
NEWS
By William F. Buckley Jr | February 3, 2000
THE PRIMARY in New Hampshire notwithstanding, candidate Al Gore can't hope to have buried the history of his variable stands on abortion. As late as primary day itself, the New York Times published an op-ed piece by abortion enthusiast Faye Wattleton, whose greatest fear is that the very subject should actually be put up for political discussion since, manifestly, it isn't a political question at all. "The right to abortion is a private issue. It shouldn't be a political football that candidates can kick around at will."
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