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Fettuccine

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NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | July 18, 2007
An abundance of leftovers from a weekend dinner party led to this pasta dish on a Monday. It came out well enough to scribble down the steps and save the recipe for the future. Some leftover chicken breast and the sauce it was cooked in started things off. Shredding the meat lends a more pleasant texture than cubing. The recipe calls for broth instead of the sauce. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Menu Fettuccine With Edamame, Chicken and Mozzarella Arugula salad with shaved parmesan Lemon ice with butter cookies Fettuccine With Edamame, Chicken and Mozzarella Serves 4 -- Total time: 32 minutes 1 1/2 cups shelled edamame 8 ounces fettuccine 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 red bell pepper, diced 1 can (14 1/2 ounces)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
The Olive Tree is not the Olive Garden. But you would be forgiven for mixing them up. Both outside and in, the two restaurants look quite similar; they share a "rustic Italian" vibe and their logos are nearly identical. Both are reasonably priced, with menus offering a broad selection of popular Italian-American meals. The similarities between the two restaurants are obvious. But the Olive Tree, locally owned with locations in Glen Burnie and Aberdeen, differentiates itself from the mega-chain Olive Garden with an emphasis on what Maryland restaurants do best: seafood.
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FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 10, 1999
Ever read food articles in which the writer is extolling the fresh, briny taste of some freshly caught seafood?These stories always make my mouth water. The writer, of course, is sitting in a cafe, overlooking a waterfront. The delicacy practically jumps from the net onto his plate. The waiter brings the perfect wine, costing pennies, and the writer is blissed out. The scene is set in the south of Spain, Portugal or France. It certainly isn't in the parking lot of your supermarket.No matter what the quality of your fish counter, it isn't nearly as romantic.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | September 19, 2007
When you get tired of zucchini, a new way to cook it is as "fettuccine." Sliced in very thin ribbons with a mandoline or vegetable peeler, it mimics the long, flat shape of the popular noodles. Quickly sauteed in a little olive oil with garlic and some lemon zest, the zucchini fettuccine makes a great accompaniment to about anything you can think of. I've served it with real fettuccine pasta for a great combo, but also as a side dish to grilled shrimp or chicken. In this instance, it becomes the bed for lamb burgers served without buns.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 7, 1999
When I entertain and am short on time, I almost always choose pasta as the main course. That's exactly what I did several days ago when cooking dinner for out-of-town friends who were here for a visit. I knew there would be no free hours during the day to prepare food, so I planned a simple menu of Fettuccine With Tomatoes, Artichokes and Sausage to serve with a mixed green salad and warm, crusty bread. Dessert consisted of carefully selected store-bought sweets and included grapefruit sorbet and cookies from a local bakery.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 16, 2005
Dottie Crow and her husband of Pismo Beach, Calif., enjoyed a pasta dish with shrimp, mussels and chopped tomatoes that was served to them while they were visiting the Carmel Mission Inn. She was hoping someone would have a similar recipe that she could prepare at home. Carl Covington from Boonville, Mo., apparently did some Internet research and sent in several versions of shrimp and mussels over pasta. The recipe he submitted for Fettuccine Provencal With Mussels and Shrimp seemed to most closely resemble what the Crows are looking for. This seafood dish is grand enough to serve to company yet simple enough to prepare anytime, particularly in winter when fresh mussels from the Atlantic Ocean are at their peak of quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 1998
You've seen them around town. On Pratt Street, in the heart of Towson, on the Avenue in White Marsh. Strapazza restaurants are turning up everywhere. But, unlike a plate of linguine in which every strand resembles the next, these informal Italian cafes are owned by different members of the Coppola family, and each has its own distinct personality.Rafael Coppola, part owner and operator of the Strapazza in Cockeysville, may hold claim to the restaurant in the least glitzy location. His Strapazza is in a down-on-its-luck shopping center.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | September 19, 2007
When you get tired of zucchini, a new way to cook it is as "fettuccine." Sliced in very thin ribbons with a mandoline or vegetable peeler, it mimics the long, flat shape of the popular noodles. Quickly sauteed in a little olive oil with garlic and some lemon zest, the zucchini fettuccine makes a great accompaniment to about anything you can think of. I've served it with real fettuccine pasta for a great combo, but also as a side dish to grilled shrimp or chicken. In this instance, it becomes the bed for lamb burgers served without buns.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | June 29, 1993
Cathy, the family couch potato, returned from college this summer tuned into fitness.She joined the health club, where she works out three days a week. She bought running shoes for alternate-day activity. And she joins me most Sundays for a 20- to 30-mile bike ride.She also started eating healthy.So when my birthday came along, she decided to give a small dinner party, featuring a fettuccine recipe she concocted herself.The menu:Appetizers: Mini crab cakes on stoned wheat crackers; spicy garbanzo dip on whole wheat pita; red, green and yellow sweet pepper strips.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 19, 1994
I have eaten fettuccine Alfredo, and I have not died.Was I lucky? Or was Jane Hurley, the nutritionist for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, exaggerating when she recently likened the creamy Italian pasta dish to a "heart attack on a plate"?I think she was stretching the truth. But, during a long telephone conversation I had this week with Ms. Hurley, she seemed convinced that the dish -- made with pasta, cream, Parmesan cheese -- had no redeeming value.I happen to like fettuccine Alfredo and lasagna, another Italian dish that Ms. Hurley scorned after analyzing the fat content of dishes at 21 Italian restaurants in New York, Chicago and San Francisco.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | July 18, 2007
An abundance of leftovers from a weekend dinner party led to this pasta dish on a Monday. It came out well enough to scribble down the steps and save the recipe for the future. Some leftover chicken breast and the sauce it was cooked in started things off. Shredding the meat lends a more pleasant texture than cubing. The recipe calls for broth instead of the sauce. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Menu Fettuccine With Edamame, Chicken and Mozzarella Arugula salad with shaved parmesan Lemon ice with butter cookies Fettuccine With Edamame, Chicken and Mozzarella Serves 4 -- Total time: 32 minutes 1 1/2 cups shelled edamame 8 ounces fettuccine 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 red bell pepper, diced 1 can (14 1/2 ounces)
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 16, 2005
Dottie Crow and her husband of Pismo Beach, Calif., enjoyed a pasta dish with shrimp, mussels and chopped tomatoes that was served to them while they were visiting the Carmel Mission Inn. She was hoping someone would have a similar recipe that she could prepare at home. Carl Covington from Boonville, Mo., apparently did some Internet research and sent in several versions of shrimp and mussels over pasta. The recipe he submitted for Fettuccine Provencal With Mussels and Shrimp seemed to most closely resemble what the Crows are looking for. This seafood dish is grand enough to serve to company yet simple enough to prepare anytime, particularly in winter when fresh mussels from the Atlantic Ocean are at their peak of quality.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | April 20, 2003
During difficult times, when the world situation is tense and uncertain, fancy entertaining is the last thing on my mind. A dinner party of several courses, which would require a good amount of time in the kitchen (not to mention cleanup afterward), or a large cocktail party or reception isn't appealing. What I long for are simple meals shared with good friends. Comfort foods that soothe the palate and the soul come to mind. Stews, potpies, meatloaves and mashed potatoes and just about any kind of pasta top the list of dishes that calm and satisfy.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 10, 1999
Ever read food articles in which the writer is extolling the fresh, briny taste of some freshly caught seafood?These stories always make my mouth water. The writer, of course, is sitting in a cafe, overlooking a waterfront. The delicacy practically jumps from the net onto his plate. The waiter brings the perfect wine, costing pennies, and the writer is blissed out. The scene is set in the south of Spain, Portugal or France. It certainly isn't in the parking lot of your supermarket.No matter what the quality of your fish counter, it isn't nearly as romantic.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 7, 1999
When I entertain and am short on time, I almost always choose pasta as the main course. That's exactly what I did several days ago when cooking dinner for out-of-town friends who were here for a visit. I knew there would be no free hours during the day to prepare food, so I planned a simple menu of Fettuccine With Tomatoes, Artichokes and Sausage to serve with a mixed green salad and warm, crusty bread. Dessert consisted of carefully selected store-bought sweets and included grapefruit sorbet and cookies from a local bakery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 1998
You've seen them around town. On Pratt Street, in the heart of Towson, on the Avenue in White Marsh. Strapazza restaurants are turning up everywhere. But, unlike a plate of linguine in which every strand resembles the next, these informal Italian cafes are owned by different members of the Coppola family, and each has its own distinct personality.Rafael Coppola, part owner and operator of the Strapazza in Cockeysville, may hold claim to the restaurant in the least glitzy location. His Strapazza is in a down-on-its-luck shopping center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
The Olive Tree is not the Olive Garden. But you would be forgiven for mixing them up. Both outside and in, the two restaurants look quite similar; they share a "rustic Italian" vibe and their logos are nearly identical. Both are reasonably priced, with menus offering a broad selection of popular Italian-American meals. The similarities between the two restaurants are obvious. But the Olive Tree, locally owned with locations in Glen Burnie and Aberdeen, differentiates itself from the mega-chain Olive Garden with an emphasis on what Maryland restaurants do best: seafood.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | April 20, 2003
During difficult times, when the world situation is tense and uncertain, fancy entertaining is the last thing on my mind. A dinner party of several courses, which would require a good amount of time in the kitchen (not to mention cleanup afterward), or a large cocktail party or reception isn't appealing. What I long for are simple meals shared with good friends. Comfort foods that soothe the palate and the soul come to mind. Stews, potpies, meatloaves and mashed potatoes and just about any kind of pasta top the list of dishes that calm and satisfy.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 19, 1994
I have eaten fettuccine Alfredo, and I have not died.Was I lucky? Or was Jane Hurley, the nutritionist for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, exaggerating when she recently likened the creamy Italian pasta dish to a "heart attack on a plate"?I think she was stretching the truth. But, during a long telephone conversation I had this week with Ms. Hurley, she seemed convinced that the dish -- made with pasta, cream, Parmesan cheese -- had no redeeming value.I happen to like fettuccine Alfredo and lasagna, another Italian dish that Ms. Hurley scorned after analyzing the fat content of dishes at 21 Italian restaurants in New York, Chicago and San Francisco.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | June 29, 1993
Cathy, the family couch potato, returned from college this summer tuned into fitness.She joined the health club, where she works out three days a week. She bought running shoes for alternate-day activity. And she joins me most Sundays for a 20- to 30-mile bike ride.She also started eating healthy.So when my birthday came along, she decided to give a small dinner party, featuring a fettuccine recipe she concocted herself.The menu:Appetizers: Mini crab cakes on stoned wheat crackers; spicy garbanzo dip on whole wheat pita; red, green and yellow sweet pepper strips.
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