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NEWS
January 17, 1994
On the third day of his presidency, President Clinton demonstrated what elections are all about. He signed orders last January reversing several controversial, abortion-related policies of the Reagan and Bush administrations.One of them was a ban on federal funding of medical research making use of tissue from aborted fetuses. That policy severely hampered research that has shown tantalizing promise for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, diabetes and leukemia.Earlier this month, the federal government announced its first grant for fetal tissue research in five years, $4.5 million to study the effects of implanting fetal tissue into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease.
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BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Reporter | January 14, 2007
Stem cells are a hot topic among biotech businesses and on Capital Hill ? where the new Congress is again considering a bill to lift restrictions on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. But there?s still a lot of confusion among the public about what the cells are, what they can do and from where they come. ?I don?t think most people understand the science ? there?s an awful lot we don?t understand yet,? said Dale Carlson, spokesman for the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, which was created to help administer $3 billion in stem cell funding for the state?
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NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM and SARA ENGRAM,Sara Engram is deputy editor of the editorial pages of The Evening Sun | January 20, 1991
YOU MAY HAVE MISSED the announcement, but President Bush has declared tomorrow "National Sanctity of Human Life Day."The proclamation comes in the same week as the 18th anniversary of the Supreme Court's Roe vs. Wade decision legalizing abortion. That 1973 ruling initiated a stand-off that has proven to be just as resistant to dialogue as Saddam Hussein's determination to hold onto Kuwait.Almost two decades later, there seems to be no chance of civil discussion, let alone compromise, between those who see a fertilized egg as a potential life that is still part of a woman's body and those who see the same microscopic speck as a tiny person with rights of its own.The nation is paying a price for this impasse.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | April 11, 2001
In a feat of biological alchemy, scientists have converted human fat into cells that make muscle, bone and cartilage, suggesting that people's least-favorite body part could become a rich source of repair cells for disease or injury. The new fat stem cells "may take the use of fetal tissue or embryonic tissue off the table as a practical matter," said Dr. Marc H. Hedrick, a plastic surgery specialist at the University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine. The Bush administration has said it supports the use of adult stem cells but not embryonic ones.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 27, 1995
CHICAGO -- Researchers from Chicago, New York and Florida report the first proof that fetal tissue transplants survived, grew and functioned in the brain of a Parkinson's patient, a milestone that eventually may lead to new therapies for Huntington's, Alzheimer's, strokes and other disorders.The transplant was linked to a significant improvement in the patient's condition, freeing him from the prison of rigidity and immobility, the main symptoms of the disease, and enabling him to enroll in an exercise class.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 27, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In May, when the Bush administration announced a plan to collect fetal tissue for medical research into Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and other ailments, officials stated that they could supply all that would be needed without using tissue from induced abortions.But newly obtained memorandums from officials at the National Institutes of Health show that the administration greatly exaggerated the amount of fetal tissue its storage bank could obtain from miscarriages and from ectopic pregnancies, in which the fertilized egg develops outside the uterus.
NEWS
May 21, 1992
What if "Murphy Brown" was a sit-trag rather than a sit-com? What if the title character in this popular TV show was not celebrating the birth of a child (albeit out of wedlock) but suffering from diabetes or Parkinson's disease or spinal cord injury or Alzheimer's disease. What if, in her desperation, she gave a plug for fetal research that might, eventually, offer some hope of a cure?Would Vice President Quayle find a "poverty of values" in such a decision on the spurious theory that the use of fetuses from induced abortions might encourage more abortions?
NEWS
By Christopher Scanlan and Christopher Scanlan,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- For 17 years, Jake Garn has been one of the Senate's most ardent opponents of abortion. Even so, he will vote this week to lift the federal ban that has blocked researchers from using tissue from aborted fetuses to try to treat some common, incurable diseases.The reason: Senator Garn's daughter Susan, 32, has diabetes, one of the diseases researchers believe may be helped by fetal-tissue transplants. She is alive today only because her father donated one of his kidneys after the disease damaged hers.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Declaring that the federal government has failed in its responsibility, two medical societies said yesterday that they would establish a board to set ethical guidelines for research involving fetal tissue and new reproductive technologies."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 27, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In May, when the Bush administration announced a plan to collect fetal tissue for medical research into Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and other ailments, officials stated that they could supply all that would be needed without using tissue from induced abortions.But newly obtained memorandums from officials at the National Institutes of Health show that the administration greatly exaggerated the amount of fetal tissue its storage bank could obtain from miscarriages and from ectopic pregnancies, in which the fertilized egg develops outside the uterus.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 1, 2001
WASHINGTON - In President Bush's first week in office, he plunged into the politically turbulent abortion debate from several angles, questioning and, in one case, reversing Clinton-era initiatives that had been the law for the past eight years. But Bush's statements and actions have not only raised the ire of the abortion rights community, which expected his opposition to its cause. They have also sent alarm bells ringing through scientific research and patients groups that fear Bush may curtail federally funded research that uses fetal tissue or stem cells from embryos and aborted fetuses.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Scientists who cultured human stem cells from discarded embryos and aborted fetuses told a Senate panel yesterday that their research could yield life-saving therapies, including a treatment for Parkinson's disease within a decade.Acknowledging that their work poses tough moral questions, the researchers said they neither created nor destroyed life in their efforts to grow tissues that could transplanted into patients suffering from a variety of ailments."I firmly believe this research holds potential for the treatment of catastrophic disease and injuries that afflict humans," said Dr. John Gearhart, an obstetrician-gynecologist from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 20, 1998
BOSTON -- Could we pause for a moment in our race past the new scientific landmarks? We went by this one so fast that we barely had time for more than a single "gee whiz."This month, the neon news flashing along the medical fast track announced that scientists were finally able to isolate and cultivate embryonic stem cells in the lab. Eventually, we are told, this breakthrough could lead to an endless supply of cells, tissue and organs, not to mention cures for problems from heart disease to Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 27, 1995
CHICAGO -- Researchers from Chicago, New York and Florida report the first proof that fetal tissue transplants survived, grew and functioned in the brain of a Parkinson's patient, a milestone that eventually may lead to new therapies for Huntington's, Alzheimer's, strokes and other disorders.The transplant was linked to a significant improvement in the patient's condition, freeing him from the prison of rigidity and immobility, the main symptoms of the disease, and enabling him to enroll in an exercise class.
NEWS
January 17, 1994
On the third day of his presidency, President Clinton demonstrated what elections are all about. He signed orders last January reversing several controversial, abortion-related policies of the Reagan and Bush administrations.One of them was a ban on federal funding of medical research making use of tissue from aborted fetuses. That policy severely hampered research that has shown tantalizing promise for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, diabetes and leukemia.Earlier this month, the federal government announced its first grant for fetal tissue research in five years, $4.5 million to study the effects of implanting fetal tissue into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
By Roll Call Report Syndicate | March 14, 1993
Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol Hill were recorded on important roll-call votes last week:YES N: NO X: NOT VOTINGHOUSE: FETAL TISSUE RESEARCHBy a vote of 253 for and 173 against, the House approved an amendment to advance fetal-tissue research to combat diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.The amendment was added to a National Institutes of Health funding bill (HR 4) that already contained language helping President Clinton lift a longtime ban on the research.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | November 27, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- It was only because he was such an avid athlete that Rod Preston noticed the little problem in his right leg when he jogged. After a couple of miles, it was as if his leg `D stopped obeying the silent, automatic commands of his brain.But the feeling would pass, and Mr. Preston shrugged it off. Probably just a pinched nerve.It was 1982, and Mr. Preston was working at a pharmaceuticals firm and pursuing a business degree at California State University, Northridge."I was the kind of a guy who would surf 'til the sun set and ski down and climb up mountains," recalls Mr. Preston, 42, of suburban Moorpark.
NEWS
By Christopher Scanlan and Christopher Scanlan,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The battle over fetal-tissue research intensified yesterday as President Bush authorized the government to begin storing tissue from miscarriages and tubal pregnancies for experimental transplants but continued to bar the use of tissue from aborted fetuses.Administration officials called the plan a "pro-research" and "pro-life" solution to a thorny ethics debate over using fetal tissue to try to find cures for diabetes, Parkinson's disease and other illnesses that afflict millions of Americans.
NEWS
January 25, 1993
In a matter of minutes on Friday, President Clinton reversed some of the most significant anti-abortion victories of the past two decades. Too bad he couldn't end, with the stroke of a pen, one of the longest and most acrimonious public debates in the nation's history. But the presence of some 75,000 demonstrators -- many of whom have gathered in Washington each Jan. 22 since 1973 to protest legalized abortion -- proved that the country has not heard the end of the issue.To mark the 20th anniversary of Roe vs. Wade, the Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion, the president signed an executive order reversing the infamous "gag rule" prohibiting any mention of abortion in federally financed family planning clinics.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | November 27, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- It was only because he was such an avid athlete that Rod Preston noticed the little problem in his right leg when he jogged. After a couple of miles, it was as if his leg `D stopped obeying the silent, automatic commands of his brain.But the feeling would pass, and Mr. Preston shrugged it off. Probably just a pinched nerve.It was 1982, and Mr. Preston was working at a pharmaceuticals firm and pursuing a business degree at California State University, Northridge."I was the kind of a guy who would surf 'til the sun set and ski down and climb up mountains," recalls Mr. Preston, 42, of suburban Moorpark.
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