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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

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NEWS
April 15, 1997
Michael Dorris,52, an adoptive parent of children with fetal alcohol syndrome and author of a prize-winning book on the subject, died Thursday or Friday in Concord, N.H., a family friend said.The Concord Monitor reported that Mr. Dorris was found Friday in a Concord motel room. Police said the death appeared to have been a suicide. The newspaper said he apparently suffocated himself using a plastic bag.Mr. Dorris won a National Book Critics Circle award in 1989 in the nonfiction category for "The Broken Cord," a first-person account of how fetal alcohol syndrome affected his eldest son, Abel, who died.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
Many predicted the 1980s crack epidemic would create a generation of children with major developmental and behavioral problems, but a new study found much of that hype hasn't panned out. Researchers from the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine found that the effects of crack cocaine in utero had only small effects on adolescent behavior, cognition and school performance. Crack is a more addictive, crystalized form of cocaine that is smoked for a intense high.
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NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | April 12, 1991
An auditorium full of restless teen-agers fell silent as Dr. Loretta P. Finnegan showed evidence of how drug use affects unborn babies.The slide projector flashed images of children deformed by fetal alcohol syndrome, infants suffering from heroin withdrawal, a baby born with half a brain to a cocaine and heroin addict."
NEWS
By TROY MCCULLOUGH and TROY MCCULLOUGH,SUN COLUMNIST | June 18, 2006
Nick Osborn has a mystery on his hands, and he's turned to the Internet masses for help. Osborn, a collector of vintage snapshots that he has scavenged from flea markets, garage sales and eBay, said he came across an odd batch of slides a few years ago, and they've intrigued him ever since. "I've never been able to figure out just what is going on," Osborn wrote in his recent appeal for assistance on Swapatorium (swapatorium. blogspot.com/2006/06/faces.html). "There are about 50 slides in all - all dating from between 1959 and 1969 and all of young women.
NEWS
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II and THOMAS H. MAUGH II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 31, 2006
Nearly 8 million children each year are born with birth defects that are genetic in origin, and fully 70 percent of them could be prevented or mitigated, according to the first worldwide study commissioned by the March of Dimes. In the absence of treatment, at least 3.3 million of the children die before the age of 5, while 3.2 million are disabled for life, according to the study released yesterday. "Our report identifies for the first time the severe and previously hidden global toll of birth defects," said Dr. Jennifer L. Howse, president of the March of Dimes.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
Many predicted the 1980s crack epidemic would create a generation of children with major developmental and behavioral problems, but a new study found much of that hype hasn't panned out. Researchers from the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine found that the effects of crack cocaine in utero had only small effects on adolescent behavior, cognition and school performance. Crack is a more addictive, crystalized form of cocaine that is smoked for a intense high.
NEWS
By TROY MCCULLOUGH and TROY MCCULLOUGH,SUN COLUMNIST | June 18, 2006
Nick Osborn has a mystery on his hands, and he's turned to the Internet masses for help. Osborn, a collector of vintage snapshots that he has scavenged from flea markets, garage sales and eBay, said he came across an odd batch of slides a few years ago, and they've intrigued him ever since. "I've never been able to figure out just what is going on," Osborn wrote in his recent appeal for assistance on Swapatorium (swapatorium. blogspot.com/2006/06/faces.html). "There are about 50 slides in all - all dating from between 1959 and 1969 and all of young women.
NEWS
March 1, 2006
On Monday, February 27, 2006, RICHARD TOMPAKOV, loving son of Catherine and the late Steven Tompakov; devoted brother of Michael Tompakov; loving grandson of Frieda and Alvin Tompakov; beloved nephew of Sherry Myers; good friends of Wendy, Jim and Jay Thaxter. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS, INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Thursday, March 2 at 12 Noon. Interment Har Zion Tifereth Israel Congregation Cemetery-Rosedale. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be directed to the National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, 900 17th Street, NW, Suite 910, Washington, DC (20006)
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 19, 2012
Women continue to mix cocktails and pregnancy despite the dangers it can pose to unborn babies. New government data found that 7.6 percent of women drank while pregnant and 1.4 percent of those moms binged on alcochol and beer. Binge drinking involves four or more drinks on one occasion. The Centers for Disease Control and Preventiion used data from a telephone survey of more than 345,000 women aged 18 to 44 to come up with its analysis. Of those, 13,880, or 4 percent, were pregnant.
NEWS
October 17, 1994
FROM "Starting Points: Meeting the Needs of Our Youngest Children," a report issued earlier this year by the Carnegie Corporation of New York:Each year, American taxpayers reach deep into their pockets to meet the costs, both direct and indirect, of policies that are based on remediation rather than prevention.* In the six years between 1985 and 1990, estimated public outlays related to teen-age childbearing totaled more than $120 billion. More than $48 billion could have been saved if these births had been postponed until the mother was age 20 or older.
NEWS
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II and THOMAS H. MAUGH II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 31, 2006
Nearly 8 million children each year are born with birth defects that are genetic in origin, and fully 70 percent of them could be prevented or mitigated, according to the first worldwide study commissioned by the March of Dimes. In the absence of treatment, at least 3.3 million of the children die before the age of 5, while 3.2 million are disabled for life, according to the study released yesterday. "Our report identifies for the first time the severe and previously hidden global toll of birth defects," said Dr. Jennifer L. Howse, president of the March of Dimes.
NEWS
April 15, 1997
Michael Dorris,52, an adoptive parent of children with fetal alcohol syndrome and author of a prize-winning book on the subject, died Thursday or Friday in Concord, N.H., a family friend said.The Concord Monitor reported that Mr. Dorris was found Friday in a Concord motel room. Police said the death appeared to have been a suicide. The newspaper said he apparently suffocated himself using a plastic bag.Mr. Dorris won a National Book Critics Circle award in 1989 in the nonfiction category for "The Broken Cord," a first-person account of how fetal alcohol syndrome affected his eldest son, Abel, who died.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | April 12, 1991
An auditorium full of restless teen-agers fell silent as Dr. Loretta P. Finnegan showed evidence of how drug use affects unborn babies.The slide projector flashed images of children deformed by fetal alcohol syndrome, infants suffering from heroin withdrawal, a baby born with half a brain to a cocaine and heroin addict."
NEWS
February 10, 1992
The idea of Grandma boozing it up may seem unthinkable. But a new report by a U.S. House subcommittee puts the lie to the image of little old ladies spending their days knitting and little old men puttering in the garden. The report on health and long-term care found that alcoholism is a problem for 2.5 million elderly Americans.Alcohol dependency in later years is partly a result of problems associated with aging: loneliness, death of a spouse or friends, physical decline and just plain boredom.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | April 15, 1991
Youngsters from poor families are more likely to be mentally retarded and suffer lifelong learning disabilities because the nation's system of preventing those illnesses for the poor is in disarray, a report to the president concludes.The report, which is to be presented to the President's Committee on Mental Retardation next week, challenges federal and state governments to improve access to adequate health care for all."Our health-care system . . . is highly discriminatory against children -- particularly minority and poor children -- and should be restructured," said Albert A. Baumeister, one of the authors of the report.
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