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NEWS
August 19, 1993
The forthcoming $150 million expansion of the Baltimore Convention Center dooms Festival Hall. The Schmoke administration is now considering moving that portable structure several blocks north to rejuvenate the Howard Street corridor.This is an intriguing idea, but one that requires realistic and unsentimental examination.From the 1858 opening of Hutzler Brothers until the 1970s, Howard Street was Baltimore's pre-eminent shopping street. Those days are now gone and never likely to return.
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NEWS
August 22, 1998
LAST WEEKEND illustrated what an exciting mosaic Baltimore is: The Stone Soul picnic brought thousands of African-American revelers to Druid Hill Park, the 98th German Festival took place in Carroll Park and India Day was celebrated at Market Place.Such a scattering of crowd events throughout the city is encouraging. This year's AFRAM festival underscored that festivals do not need to be downtown to succeed. Its new West Baltimore location around Mondawmin Mall seemed to make everyone happy.
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1994
Wrecking crews began demolishing Festival Hall yesterday, peeling off the tin roof like aluminum foil off a TV dinner while two Potts and Callahan backhoes clawed at the box-shaped structure.Festival Hall is adjacent to the Baltimore Convention Center, and for about a decade it was a home for ethnic festivals and small trade shows. It is being razed to make way for an expanded convention center. The demolition work is expected to last three weeks.Bruce Hoffman, executive director of the Maryland Stadium Authority, said the convention center will cover three city blocks and hold 9,000 people.
NEWS
June 1, 1996
THIS WEEKEND KICKS OFF the Baltimore area's season of ethnic festivals. People of Polish ancestry gather around the Pulaski Monument in Patterson Park; Lithuanians celebrate at the Catonsville Armory. By the time the series ends in late September with the Ukrainian festival, more than a dozen ethnic festivals will have highlighted the diversity of the Baltimore region's roots.Ethnic festivals have existed here for more than 200 years. Except that in the early days they were just an ordinary part of the social life of a wide variety of immigrant communities.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | August 16, 1993
The Schmoke administration is considering moving Baltimore's Festival Hall north a few blocks to help rejuvenate the Howard Street corridor.The Baltimore Development Corp. hired consultants this year to evaluate options for moving the 8-year-old meeting place at Howard and Pratt streets and instructed them to study sites along the Howard-Eutaw corridor, including one south of the Lexington Arcade.Home to a steady mix of summer festivals, car shows, crafts fairs and other events that draw hundreds of thousands of people a year, the $4.5 million building must be dismantled to make way for construction of a $150 million expansion of the Convention Center.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and David Michael Ettlin and Gregory P. Kane and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writers | October 22, 1993
Baltimore's Festival Hall, where countless thousands of people have celebrated the American melting pot during eight years of ethnic fetes, will be demolished rather than moved to make way for the $151 million Convention Center expansion.The building was designed with the idea of eventually dismantling and moving it from the block bounded by Howard, Camden, Sharp and Conway streets, but consultants for the Baltimore Development Corp. say that option is too costly."The existing building cannot be dismantled and relocated elsewhere except at great expense," said Michael Seipp, executive vice president of BEDCO.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | January 28, 1993
Has Baltimore's Festival Hall outlived its usefulness?If state legislators approve funds this spring to expand the Convention Center on the site of Festival Hall, what should city officials do with the existing structure? Would it be worthwhile to invest potentially millions of dollars to move it -- and if so, where?To answer such questions, the Baltimore Development Corp. is about to commission a feasibility study. The agency is looking for consultants capable of evaluating the cost and benefits of moving the $4.5 million facility to "various sites within the downtown area."
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | January 19, 1992
If you have any thoughts of replacing that rusty old buggy sitting in the driveway, now is the best time to see everything the industry has to offer.Auto manufacturers from around the world have their latest models in town and on display in the Baltimore Convention Center and adjacent Festival Hall as part of the eighth annual International Auto Show.It is like having all the car dealers scattered along Ritchie Highway under one roof in a gala event offering industry officials the opportunity to hawk their wares at a time when showroom traffic has been dismal.
FEATURES
August 1, 1991
FridayOutside Festival Hall on Main Stage6:30 p.m.: parade at Eutaw and Dolphin streets.* 6:45 p.m.: Delilah* 7:30 p.m.: Opening ceremonies* 7:45 p.m.: Spur of the Moment* 9:15 p.m.: Harold Melvin and the Blue NotesInside Festival Hall:* 7 p.m.: Omar Chandler* 8 p.m.: Marva Hicks* 9 p.m.: Brand New HeaviesSaturday:Outside Festival Hall on Main Stage1:15 p.m.: The Look* 2:15 p.m.: Gloria Jennings Fashion Show* 3:45 p.m.: The Flirt* 4:30 p.m.: James Foster*...
FEATURES
July 12, 1993
TODAY11 a.m.-9 p.m.: Upper Deck All-Star FanFest, a baseball theme park. Baltimore Convention Center and Festival Hall. Admission is $12 for adults, $8 for seniors 62 and older, children 12 and younger and military.11 a.m.-9 p.m.: Baltimore's All-Star StreetFest Workout Day, Camden Street, south of Festival Hall. Features exercise and aerobic activities. (410) 837-4636.4 p.m.: StreetFest Step Competition, Camden Street. African-American fraternities and sororities perform rhythmic steps and cheers.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | December 11, 1994
The KinderGala, a black-tie dinner dance, has been a tremendous source of money for the Kennedy Krieger Institute since it began 14 years ago. Although it's one of the pricier of the fund-raisers at $275 a ticket, it has never had a problem attracting guests.This year was no exception, with more than 800 people dancing to the music of the Fabulous Fantoms Band and dining on gourmet fare dished up by the Hyatt's Larry Frank.But something was missing. The sparkle was gone. That's it, there were no Christmas trees, and it felt a little as if "The Grinch Who Stole Christmas" had been there.
NEWS
By Holton F. Brown | November 18, 1994
Also in yesterday's editions, an incorrect date was given for the opening of a permanent exhibit on local pharmaceutical and drug industries at the Baltimore Museum of Industry. The exhibit will open Dec. 2.+ The Sun regrets the errors.THANKSGIVING, THE PARADE:Weather permitting, the city's annual Thanksgiving Parade will strut eastward across Pratt Street beginning at 11 a.m. tomorrow, starting near Eutaw Street and ending at Market Place.Baltimore's own Vincent Pettway, who won the International Boxing Federation's junior middleweight boxing championship on Sept.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1994
Wrecking crews began demolishing Festival Hall yesterday, peeling off the tin roof like aluminum foil off a TV dinner while two Potts and Callahan backhoes clawed at the box-shaped structure.Festival Hall is adjacent to the Baltimore Convention Center, and for about a decade it was a home for ethnic festivals and small trade shows. It is being razed to make way for an expanded convention center. The demolition work is expected to last three weeks.Bruce Hoffman, executive director of the Maryland Stadium Authority, said the convention center will cover three city blocks and hold 9,000 people.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | December 23, 1993
Cambridge residents got an early Christmas present this month when the Schaefer administration committed $3 million to help pay for Sailwinds Park, a $35 million waterfront recreation area and tourist attraction along the Choptank River.The money, from the state Department of Transportation, will be combined with other funds to build a $4 million visitors center near the entrance to the park.It is the first multimillion-dollar infusion for the Eastern Shore project, which is intended to revitalize Cambridge in the same way that the Inner Harbor redevelopment brought visitors to downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
October 27, 1993
Save Festival Hall and lots of money, tooLet me see if I understand this correctly: Baltimore City plans to demolish a perfectly good building, Festival Hall, in order to expand the Convention Center. A study has determined that Festival Hall, which was conceived and designed as a temporary structure, is not.Putting aside the question of whether Festival Hall architectural or construction contracts were properly fulfilled, how is is possible for Baltimore City to proceed with an estimated $151 million expansion project when there are more pressing needs in the city?
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and David Michael Ettlin and Gregory P. Kane and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writers | October 22, 1993
Baltimore's Festival Hall, where countless thousands of people have celebrated the American melting pot during eight years of ethnic fetes, will be demolished rather than moved to make way for the $151 million Convention Center expansion.The building was designed with the idea of eventually dismantling and moving it from the block bounded by Howard, Camden, Sharp and Conway streets, but consultants for the Baltimore Development Corp. say that option is too costly."The existing building cannot be dismantled and relocated elsewhere except at great expense," said Michael Seipp, executive vice president of BEDCO.
NEWS
August 17, 1993
It is good that the Schmoke administration is trying to figure out what to do with Festival Hall now that an expansion of the Convention Center will make that eight-year-old structure redundant. But before officials begin seriously thinking about moving that hall anywhere, they ought to establish whether it is movable.It so happens that the Maryland Stadium Authority has looked into that possibility.Its conclusion was "it didn't appear that it was a building that could be easily movable," according to Bruce Hoffman, the authority's executive director.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | February 22, 1992
Last year more than 30,000 people went to the American Craft Council Craft Show. This year's show, being held this weekend at the Baltimore Convention Center and adjoining Festival Hall, promises to be just as packed.If you're planning to attend the show, remember: Forewarned is forearmed:* There will be more than 550 craftspeople selling ceramics, metal, wood, fiber, jewelry, clothing, glass and other media. That's a lot of booths to see, so be sure to wear comfortable shoes and clothing.
NEWS
August 19, 1993
The forthcoming $150 million expansion of the Baltimore Convention Center dooms Festival Hall. The Schmoke administration is now considering moving that portable structure several blocks north to rejuvenate the Howard Street corridor.This is an intriguing idea, but one that requires realistic and unsentimental examination.From the 1858 opening of Hutzler Brothers until the 1970s, Howard Street was Baltimore's pre-eminent shopping street. Those days are now gone and never likely to return.
NEWS
August 17, 1993
It is good that the Schmoke administration is trying to figure out what to do with Festival Hall now that an expansion of the Convention Center will make that eight-year-old structure redundant. But before officials begin seriously thinking about moving that hall anywhere, they ought to establish whether it is movable.It so happens that the Maryland Stadium Authority has looked into that possibility.Its conclusion was "it didn't appear that it was a building that could be easily movable," according to Bruce Hoffman, the authority's executive director.
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