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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | September 4, 2007
The ethanol boom might reduce the nation's dependence on foreign oil, but the huge increase in corn crops that it requires could seriously harm the Chesapeake Bay, according to a government report to be released today. The report by the multistate Chesapeake Bay Commission estimates that demand for ethanol will lead to an increase of 300,000 acres of corn in the six-state watershed. That increase would erode the progress that farmers have made in reducing the amount of pollution flowing into the bay from farms, sending an added 5 million pounds of nitrogen into the estuary each year.
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NEWS
By Laura Ciolkowski and Laura Ciolkowski,Chicago Tribune | August 26, 2007
Embryo Culture Making Babies in the Twenty-First Century By Beth Kohl Sarah Crichton/Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 288 pages / $24 In 1978, an eternity ago as measured by advances in science and technology, the first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, was born in England. Either a tiny blessing from heaven brought into the world with a little help from a team of miracle workers in white lab coats, or a suspicious "alien life-form" manufactured in the artificial light of a petri dish, Louise was for many a Rorschach test for the rapidly growing arsenal of modern reproductive technologies.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | August 1, 2007
There are signs along a forlorn stretch of U.S. 40 on the west side that Mayor Sheila Dixon is trying to make Baltimore better, and I don't mean all the new trees, shrubs and stamped concrete planters in the median strips. I mean the 4-by-8-foot, city-sponsored placards with Dixon's name on them. "A cleaner, greener, safer and healthier Baltimore," they read on top. On the bottom, the signs give kudos to "Mayor Sheila Dixon and the Citizens of Baltimore." That's right: a great, big thank-you to the mayor seeking re-election and the taxpayers who paid for the signs promoting her. When the median work began months ago, the city posted large placards at either end of the project, so passing motorists would be aware of the beautification project.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 1, 2007
Judd Apatow is the best friend the schlubs of the world have ever had, for in the world he's created onscreen, they always get the girl. And not just any girl, but the most beautiful girl. Knocked Up continues the tradition Apatow started in 2005's The 40-Year-Old Virgin, where Steve Carell, as cinema's most inexperienced, least refined lothario, ended up with Catherine Keener anyway. Here, it's Seth Rogen as an arrested adolescent who believes life is best lived stoned and whose aspiration is to create a Web site listing every nude scene ever filmed.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | March 30, 2007
Men whose mothers ate a lot of beef during their pregnancy have a sperm count about 25 percent below normal and three times the normal risk of fertility problems, researchers reported this week. The problem may be because of anabolic steroids used in the United States to fatten the cattle, Dr. Shanna H. Swan of the University of Rochester Medical Center reported in the journal Human Reproduction. It could also be because of pesticides and other environmental contaminants, she said. If the sperm deficit is related to the hormones in beef, Swan's findings may be "just the tip of the iceberg," wrote biologist Frederick vom Saal of the University of Missouri- Columbia in an editorial accompanying the paper.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest and Nancy Jones Bonbrest,Special to The Sun | March 18, 2007
Not sure what the strange vine that's taking over your garden is or how to get your grass looking green without drowning it in chemicals? Can't figure out what the odd splotches are on the holly tree or where they came from? If you have garden and landscape questions such as these, you're in luck. The Home and Garden Information Center in Ellicott City, part of the University of Maryland Cooperative Extension, offers personalized solutions to quandaries about pests, plants and landscaping.
NEWS
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Hartford (Conn.) Courant | September 3, 2006
NEW YORK -- Two years of Maggie Gyllenhaal's work are flooding the cineplex around the time of her first child's birth. Talk about labor. If delivering movies were the same as babies, Gyllenhaal would need a double epidural. The release Friday of Trust the Man, a romantic comedy, follows on the heels of the July release of World Trade Center. Then, also this month, in limited release, comes Sherrybaby, marking her second film as the lead. Another supporting role follows in the Will Ferrell vehicle Stranger Than Fiction, having its premiere at the Toronto Film Festival and opening in November.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | August 4, 2006
ON THE POCOMOKE RIVER -- Joseph Fehrer Jr. paddled through dirt-black water and past islands of gnarled roots to an ancient cypress tree. On one side of the colossus stretched 1,000 acres of farmland where a developer plans to build 2,170 homes, a grocery store, a movie theater and shops that would triple the population of Snow Hill. On the other side of the tree, across the Pocomoke River, sits a 9,300-acre nature preserve that Fehrer's father helped create to protect this rare and vanishing cypress swamp.
NEWS
By JASON CHOW AND RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and JASON CHOW AND RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 4, 2006
TORONTO -- Seventeen people believed to have been inspired by al-Qaida were arrested and a large amount of explosives seized in raids that Canadian authorities said yesterday prevented terror attacks against targets in southern Ontario. Authorities said they recovered three tons of the commonly used fertilizer ammonia nitrate, about three times the amount used in the bombing of the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, which killed 168 people in 1995. Police are treating the case as a "homegrown plot by homegrown terrorists," said Royal Canadian Mounted Police spokeswoman Michelle Paradis.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | May 14, 2006
It seems that the anxiety associated with a trip to fill up the tank has never been higher. But imagine pulling up to a gas station and pumping 200 gallons of fuel. That is what farmers do routinely. For example, a tractor big enough to pull a 30-foot, 12-row seeder will burn 15 gallons of diesel fuel in an hour, said Melvin Baile Jr., who farms about 750 acres near New Windsor in Carroll County. "It is like getting hit with a hammer, and it is making our lives very, very difficult," Baile said.
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