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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Since I can't use fertilizer as a de-icer now that Maryland has a new lawn fertilizer law, what should I use instead that won't damage my plants? I'm on a fixed income. We've never recommended fertilizer as de-icer. Commercial de-icers can cause some problems, though. See our de-icer chart at http://ter.ps/MeltIceSafe to compare them. Sand and kitty litter are possible substitutes. Also, if you have only a small area to keep clear of ice, you can drape heavy plastic or another waterproof material over the area and lift it after the ice event.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
The sprawling farm along Annapolis Road in Gambrills stands as an oasis of rural life in the midst of suburbia. Cows graze beyond the white fence as commuters pass by; farm trucks carry organic produce to local farmers markets. Maryland Sunrise Farm is on 857 acres that served as a dairy operation for the U.S. Naval Academy as recently as the 1990s; midshipmen got their milk straight from the source. Its corn maze is a fall tradition, and residents say the farm is a reminder of Anne Arundel's agricultural past, a marker of history in a fast-growing portion of the county not far from Fort Meade.
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NEWS
May 1, 2013
In my reading and listening about the fertilizer plant fire and explosion in West, Texas, I have noticed a dearth of comments about the dangers faced by first responders ("Obama to honor firefighters killed in Texas fertilizer blast," April 24). One of the purposes of the various federal and local chemical reporting requirements is to provide nearby fire companies with information for protecting themselves and for appropriate methods of reacting to an incident. That knowledge, buttressed by fire company inspections of nearby plants, can save lives.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Since I can't use fertilizer as a de-icer now that Maryland has a new lawn fertilizer law, what should I use instead that won't damage my plants? I'm on a fixed income. We've never recommended fertilizer as de-icer. Commercial de-icers can cause some problems, though. See our de-icer chart at http://ter.ps/MeltIceSafe to compare them. Sand and kitty litter are possible substitutes. Also, if you have only a small area to keep clear of ice, you can drape heavy plastic or another waterproof material over the area and lift it after the ice event.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
The struggle to save the Chesapeake Bay is hitting home, quite literally, as lawmakers in Annapolis eye new regulation of lawn fertilizer — and how and when it can be applied. Homeowners and lawn-care companies alike could face new rules on fertilizing lawns under state legislation aimed at enlisting city dwellers and suburbanites in the bay cleanup. Bills heard Tuesday by a Senate committee would require reductions in the amount of plant nutrients in lawn fertilizer and tighten regulation of commercial lawn-care businesses.
NEWS
May 28, 2011
If you live along the Patapsco River, Sparrows Point, Bear Creek or Coke Point you and your family are paying with your health ("Port authorities find health risks near Sparrows Point," May 23). These four areas are overwhelmingly contaminated to the point where people and wildlife are at risk of exposure to toxic chemicals and carcinogens. Benzene is only one of many chemical contaminates in our waters; there are also high levels of arsenic from chicken manure, pesticides and chemical fertilizers.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | February 26, 1995
Over the river and through the woods to gather manure I go. My truck knows the route, and I've got the scoop on the best fertilizer I know.It's sitting in a heap at a horse farm down the road. Never mind where. Gardeners who find a good source of manure like to keep it to themselves. I only mention the river and woods because there are lots of them around, and I know that my secret will never be found.Now, I know what some of you are thinking: Is this man serious? Does he really believe people care where he gets his fertilizer?
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | March 2, 2003
AS A COMPANY, Agrium Inc. will probably always stink. It makes fertilizer. As a stock in the former bull market, Agrium wasn't much more fragrant. It didn't have "dot-com" in its name. It was in Canada. It sold low-tech products to struggling farmers. It was the kind of firm investors came to hate. The 1990s stock bubble was based on an infatuation with technology and so-called "intellectual property," the copyrights and patents that let Disney and Microsoft spin money out of vaporous ideas.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 3, 1991
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Bill Bricker was way over his head in, well, insect dung before he got bold and decided to call CC-84 what it really was.Kricket Krap.Now his fertilizer sales have more than quadrupled and people all over the country have called asking just how he managed to gather the manure of so many jumping bugs.It seems that most gardeners hadn't given much thought before to whether crickets, to put it plainly, poop. And after considering the idea, some simply refused to believe it."Hey, I didn't fall off a turnip truck yesterday," a man snarled when Mr. Bricker tried to sell him a sack of Kricket Krap.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 2002
Q. Chicken litter is now being packaged and sold as fertilizer for lawns and gardens. Do you know anything about the fertilizer? A. It is called fertileGRO and is being sold as an organic fertilizer that contains 4 percent nitrogen, 3 percent phosphorus and 3 percent potash, along with several other micro- and macro- nutrients. The litter is collected from chicken growers on the Delmarva Peninsula and then heat-treated to pasteurize, sterilize and stabilize the material. The material is then pelletized so that it can be run through lawn and garden spreaders.
NEWS
By David Driver, For The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
As a young girl, Jean Brinton Jaecks would sit around her family's dinner table in Severn and listen to her parents talk about nature, light and color. Her mother, Mary, was a painter; her father, Earl, created wood sculptures as a break from his job as a designer at Westinghouse. "Back in the 1960s, they began an organic garden," Jaecks recalls. "In 1961, that was unheard of. The neighbors made fun of them. " Love of the outdoors and the arts were reinforced during summer vacations, when the family would drive to Cape Ann and Rockport in Maine.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 1, 2013
Among the hundreds of new laws taking effect Tuesday (Oct. 1) is one meant to help the Chesapeake Bay by limiting when, where and how Marylanders should feed their lawns. One scientist, though, suggests homeowners could help the bay better by forgoing lawn fertilizer altogether. The Fertilizer Use Act of 2011 restricts the nutrient content of all grass food sold in Maryland, barring phosphorus from most lawn-care products and setting limits on how much nitrogen should be applied.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
What kind of lawn fertilizer should I use in the fall? There are so many kinds with different numbers and different chemicals and some with zero chemicals. Glad you asked. The Maryland Fertilizer Use Act of 2011 kicks in fully on Oct.1. The law, aimed at protecting the Chesapeake Bay, limits the amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus in fertilizer products. We have a new publication on our website that explains the new rules. Go to http://mda.maryland.gov/Documents/HowToFertilizeYourLawn.pdf.
NEWS
May 1, 2013
In my reading and listening about the fertilizer plant fire and explosion in West, Texas, I have noticed a dearth of comments about the dangers faced by first responders ("Obama to honor firefighters killed in Texas fertilizer blast," April 24). One of the purposes of the various federal and local chemical reporting requirements is to provide nearby fire companies with information for protecting themselves and for appropriate methods of reacting to an incident. That knowledge, buttressed by fire company inspections of nearby plants, can save lives.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | April 2, 2013
Supporters and critics of legislation that would grant farmers a 10-year reprieve from new environmental regulations squared off before a House committee Tuesday, with much of the debate focused on provisions in the bill barring any public disclosure of those granted the deferral. Farm group representatives, O'Malley administration officials and others told members of the House Environmental Matters Committee that offering state farmers a shield from new environmental cleanup requirements could boost efforts to clean up the Chesapeake Bay.  Farmers would voluntarily agree to reduce polluted runoff of soil and fertilizer from their farms beyond what they're now required to do, proponents say. Sen. Thomas M. Middleton, the bill's chief sponsor, said many farmers are having to invest in new equipment and facilities now to comply with recently adopted state regulations on how, when and where fertilizer can be spread on the ground.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
The last couple of years my lilac hasn't bloomed. It's always been a favorite. What can I do? There could be several causes. Because we've gotten many calls about this in recent years, it may be related to climate change. Our common lilac will technically grow in areas as warm as zone 7, but it needs a winter chilling period in order to form flower buds successfully. Other things to consider are pH (if it gets too acid, lime will raise it closer to 6.5-7), too much shade encroaching on this sun-loving plant or European hornets stripping bark and girdling branches (remove the oldest canes, which they prefer)
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1997
Not all global coastal water pollution can be pinned to too much nitrogen, but much of it can. In fact, there is growing scientific concern that the world's coastal waters are symptoms of something even larger gone terribly out of whack.An article published in January by nine scientists in the journal of the Ecological Society of America says that human activities in recent decades have virtually doubled the nitrogen available to life on the planet, "causing serious and long-term environmental consequences across large regions of the earth."
FEATURES
April 26, 1998
Q.I'm having a few problems with the tomato, eggplant and pepper transplants I'm growing indoors. I keep them under fluorescent lights and fertilize them once a week. The leaves have brown spots on them and the eggplant is flopping over. What am I doing wrong?A.Stop fertilizing those plants so much! Too much fertilizer can burn a plant's leaves. Your transplants only need to be fertilized once every three to four weeks. Mix the fertilizer with water around the base of the plants.Eggplant transplants are usually more lanky than tomato or pepper transplants.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
As a concerned mother and environmentalist, I want to thank The Sun for its recent article on pollution in the Chesapeake Bay ("Report finds widespread contaminants in the bay," Jan. 22). Meaningful efforts to significantly improve the bay must address pesticide runoff. The Pesticide Use Reporting Bill would require certified pesticide and fertilizer applicators to report usage data to a centralized database. Centralizing such information would benefit public agencies in their response to fish kills, dead zones and human health outbreaks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Part of the charm of Baltimore's arts scene is that someone is always hitting the "refresh" button. An art gallery or music club shuts down on one block, only to have another pop up a few streets over. Abandoned or underused venues might suddenly sprout a theater troupe one day, an artists' collective the next. A lot of the refreshing can be traced to a thriving DIY culture in town, a culture that has been responsible for some of the most intriguing new enterprises over the years and that helps give the city its reputation as a place where artists of every genre can find - or create - an outlet.
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