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By KANSAS CITY STAR | October 6, 2002
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. - Single women and lesbian couples seeking to get pregnant with help from modern science now have fewer options in the Kansas City area. Citing conflicts with its religious views, Shawnee Mission Medical Center in Overland Park recently stopped offering assisted reproduction services to single women. The hospital joins the growing ranks of private fertility clinics in Kansas and Missouri that for varying ethical and legal reasons have excluded single women from their practice.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser | July 3, 2012
Ah yes, we return this week to the "Real Housewives of New York City" with another fight about London, a single storyline with LuAnn's pregnancy problems, and a few jabs by Ramona. Honestly, there was nothing new with the NYC ladies this week. It felt like this episode was just a repeat of the last but this time with slightly different dialogue and different scenery. Here are some of the highlights. Heather and Aviva meet in the park to chat about the London issue with Ramona.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 1995
In what experts are calling the first lawsuits of their kind since the technology of in vitro fertilization was introduced 17 years ago, two Rhode Island couples have sued the state's only fertility clinic, accusing it of losing nine embryos.The suits, filed in July and August against Women and Infants Hospital in Providence, are the second set of serious charges leveled against a fertility clinic this year and have renewed calls for federal regulation of the growing reproductive technology industry.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2003
Time waits for no man. Or embryo. Imagine enduring weeks of hormone injections, probes and antibiotics - not to mention thousands of dollars in expense - for the chance to solve an infertility problem through a lab-aided procedure called in vitro fertilization. Then the critical day arrives, when eggs must be collected from ovaries at an appointed hour, and the prospective mother looks out the window and sees mountains of snow standing between her and the fertility clinic that can make her pregnancy dream come true.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | August 21, 1992
One of the top physicians in the Greater Baltimore Medical Center's highly successful in-vitro fertilization program has left to open his own free-standing fertility clinic in Towson.Dr. Santiago L. Padilla opened the Fertility Center of Maryland at 110 West Road last week after resigning earlier as associate director of GBMC's Fertility and In-Vitro Fertilization Center.His new clinic is believed to be the second for-profit fertility practice to be established in the Baltimore area outside a hospital setting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser | July 3, 2012
Ah yes, we return this week to the "Real Housewives of New York City" with another fight about London, a single storyline with LuAnn's pregnancy problems, and a few jabs by Ramona. Honestly, there was nothing new with the NYC ladies this week. It felt like this episode was just a repeat of the last but this time with slightly different dialogue and different scenery. Here are some of the highlights. Heather and Aviva meet in the park to chat about the London issue with Ramona.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2003
Time waits for no man. Or embryo. Imagine enduring weeks of hormone injections, probes and antibiotics - not to mention thousands of dollars in expense - for the chance to solve an infertility problem through a lab-aided procedure called in vitro fertilization. Then the critical day arrives, when eggs must be collected from ovaries at an appointed hour, and the prospective mother looks out the window and sees mountains of snow standing between her and the fertility clinic that can make her pregnancy dream come true.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 29, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- One of the nation's leading fertility clinics has been ordered to close this week after its sponsor, the University of California, accused its doctors of playing God with their patients, transplanting their eggs and embryos and conducting research on them without their knowledge or consent.After more than a year of investigation after what it called whistle-blower complaints, the university terminated its contract this month with the clinic, the Center for Reproductive Health, and told its doctors to remove their medical equipment from its Irvine campus by Friday.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
Infertile couples who think they have exhausted every option in their quest to have a baby will soon have another alternative: eggs from anonymous donors.The University of Maryland Medical Center is offering $1,200 to women who are willing to undergo a few weeks of hormone injections, four or five days of ultrasound tests and a semi-surgical "egg retrieval" -- only to give up their eggs to someone else.Advertisements soliciting donors between the ages of 18 and 35 began appearing in community newspapers last week.
NEWS
By ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | November 23, 1995
SANTA ANA, Calif. -- When the fertility industry opened its arms to outside regulation this week, it was an extraordinary move that pleased some critics but also prompted concerns about higher costs for patients and new levels of bureaucracy for doctors.Among the physicians who welcomed the call for the independent licensing of fertility clinics was Dr. Richard Paulson, chief of the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at the University of Southern California School of Medicine.
NEWS
By KANSAS CITY STAR | October 6, 2002
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. - Single women and lesbian couples seeking to get pregnant with help from modern science now have fewer options in the Kansas City area. Citing conflicts with its religious views, Shawnee Mission Medical Center in Overland Park recently stopped offering assisted reproduction services to single women. The hospital joins the growing ranks of private fertility clinics in Kansas and Missouri that for varying ethical and legal reasons have excluded single women from their practice.
NEWS
By ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | November 23, 1995
SANTA ANA, Calif. -- When the fertility industry opened its arms to outside regulation this week, it was an extraordinary move that pleased some critics but also prompted concerns about higher costs for patients and new levels of bureaucracy for doctors.Among the physicians who welcomed the call for the independent licensing of fertility clinics was Dr. Richard Paulson, chief of the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at the University of Southern California School of Medicine.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 1995
In what experts are calling the first lawsuits of their kind since the technology of in vitro fertilization was introduced 17 years ago, two Rhode Island couples have sued the state's only fertility clinic, accusing it of losing nine embryos.The suits, filed in July and August against Women and Infants Hospital in Providence, are the second set of serious charges leveled against a fertility clinic this year and have renewed calls for federal regulation of the growing reproductive technology industry.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 29, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- One of the nation's leading fertility clinics has been ordered to close this week after its sponsor, the University of California, accused its doctors of playing God with their patients, transplanting their eggs and embryos and conducting research on them without their knowledge or consent.After more than a year of investigation after what it called whistle-blower complaints, the university terminated its contract this month with the clinic, the Center for Reproductive Health, and told its doctors to remove their medical equipment from its Irvine campus by Friday.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | August 21, 1992
One of the top physicians in the Greater Baltimore Medical Center's highly successful in-vitro fertilization program has left to open his own free-standing fertility clinic in Towson.Dr. Santiago L. Padilla opened the Fertility Center of Maryland at 110 West Road last week after resigning earlier as associate director of GBMC's Fertility and In-Vitro Fertilization Center.His new clinic is believed to be the second for-profit fertility practice to be established in the Baltimore area outside a hospital setting.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
Infertile couples who think they have exhausted every option in their quest to have a baby will soon have another alternative: eggs from anonymous donors.The University of Maryland Medical Center is offering $1,200 to women who are willing to undergo a few weeks of hormone injections, four or five days of ultrasound tests and a semi-surgical "egg retrieval" -- only to give up their eggs to someone else.Advertisements soliciting donors between the ages of 18 and 35 began appearing in community newspapers last week.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1997
On paper, infertility would seem a distasteful subject matter for light comedy. On screen, it only gets worse."A Smile Like Yours," featuring a terminally bland Greg Kinnear and a too precious Lauren Holly (both in "Sabrina"), is a massive miscalculation. The humor, straight out of a junior-high sex education class, is adolescent in its mockery of the truly embarrassing and painful procedures infertile couples endure. What could be funnier?Kinnear is Danny Robertson, the owner of a small construction company, and Holly is his wife, Jennifer, who sells perfumes as aroma-therapy.
FEATURES
February 28, 2005
In the News Handshake clinches sale of Mel Gibson's ranch Actor Mel Gibson has sold his 45,000-acre Beartooth Ranch near Columbus, Mont., in a multimillion-dollar handshake deal with a neighbor, the buyers said. Kent and Pam Williams said they signed the deed last week, but said the agreement prevents either party from divulging the purchase price. The Billings Gazette reported the sale yesterday. Ranch manager John Carrel said Gibson declined to comment. `Menagerie' pushed back If you're anxious to see Christian Slater in the Broadway revival of The Glass Menagerie, you'll just have to wait a little longer - the opening has been pushed back by a week.
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