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By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | June 6, 1993
Q: How valuable is my glass-covered 5-inch-square ferris wheel puzzle by Columbia Manufacturing Co. of Baltimore? The object is to get steel balls into open slots on the ferris wheel. Its box says that $300 in prizes would be distributed on May 31, 1894, to those solving the puzzle fastest.A: Vintage dexterity puzzles, those mesmerizing but often frustrating games requiring manipulating small boxes of balls or beads into slots or holes, are becoming addictive collectibles. Until recently, most traded at flea markets for under $10 each.
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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
Rodney, Rodney, Rodney! This Ocean City lifeguard lookalike gets all of the attention in summer so it makes complete sense that he's taking over the town - at least for a day. Ocean City officials say the "spokesguard" - um, he's not a real member of the beach patrol - will be all about town on Tuesday, meeting visitors, posing for photos, traveling the boardwalk and even working behind the counter at Fisher's Popcorn. Rodney's day will start early at the umbrella stand near the pier.
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FEATURES
By Gwen Salley-Schoen and Gwen Salley-Schoen,McClatchy News Service | August 28, 1993
In 1893, most people had never seen an automobile or an electric light, talked on a telephone or even used a zipper, so it's tough to imagine what went through their minds when they saw the first Ferris wheel silhouetted against the sky at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago.These days the Ferris wheel is so common a midway ride it's not surprising to see them in mall parking lots. But even by today's standards, the original wheel would take your breath away. It was 26 stories high and three times larger than the largest wheel constructed since.
EXPLORE
By Sharon Rydell, sbrydell13@aol.comsbrydell13@aol.com | June 17, 2013
Do you remember Gwynn Oak Junction? Then you may have gone to the movies at what was the Ambassador Theatre, bought your groceries at Schreiber's, purchased your very first Halloween costume at Read's, spent your allowance at Ben Franklin, and gotten your hair styled at Dorothy's Beauty Parlor. You surely then will remember Gwynn Oak Park, just short hop down Gwynn Oak Avenue, to the corner of Gwyndale, through which ran the Gwynn Falls Creek. Once you got past ticket booth with the nasty smiling-clown's face on it , you knew you were in for an afternoon of great fun - and perhaps a little adventure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Shelonda Stokes has a vision for this year's African American Festival — and it's a whopper. In her second year producing the festival, she's already excited about one of its new features: a fitness-craving flashmob, with enough people to earn a place in the Guinness Book of World Records, bopping and gyrating to the tune of Beyonce singing "Move Your Body. " That part's all planned and ready to go. Now here's the dream part: One of those dancers leading the way is first lady Michelle Obama.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 9, 1999
LONDON -- Big Ben, move over. The big wheel has hit town.Larger than a football field and weighing in like a Sumo wrestler forged in steel, a gargantuan Ferris wheel is due to be hoisted onto the London skyline in a maneuver that organizers compare to the launch of a space shuttle.After months of assembling a spider's web of cables and steel, sweaty-palmed engineers and gritty construction workers will oversee the wheel's rise along the south bank of the Thames River, opposite the Houses of Parliament and venerable Big Ben clock tower.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2011
Above, find a high-resolution map of Merriweather Post Pavilion grounds on Saturday for Virgin FreeFest. The map looks much like last year's. There are three stages: a dance forest, a festival stage on the venue's West side, and a main stage at the amphitheater. There will again be a ferris wheel. The heart of the venue will be again commandeered by festival sponsor Kyocera. Doors will open at 11 a.m. The first band goes up at noon on the dance forest stage. The full schedule is here .
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
The Columbia City Fair had it all: a birthday cake, a concert band and a Ferris wheel that stranded eight people Sunday in the middle of their ride.The three-day event at Lake Kittamaqundi, which drew an estimated 60,000 people, ended Sunday with the cake and a visit from James W. Rouse, founder of the company that developed Columbia.Rouse, pale and thin after undergoing coronary bypass surgery a month ago, praised the city for living up to its ideal as a racially diverse community."The people of Columbia have such an extraordinary spirit," the Rouse Co. founder told the cheering crowd.
NEWS
August 28, 1993
This year marks the centenary of the introduction of the Ferris wheel at the 1893 Columbian Exposition. The original wheel cost a whopping $300,000 to build, weighed 1,200 tons and carried 36 cars, each holding 40 persons. Paris had its Eiffel Tower but Chicago -- and America -- had this smashing new ride.To commemorate this milestone in popular culture, the Maryland State Fair features a new Ferris wheel when it begins its 10-day run today at the Timonium fairgrounds.Over the past 112 years, the State Fair has firmly established itself as a Maryland family tradition that successfully combines education with entertainment.
NEWS
July 1, 1993
THIS year marks the centennial anniversary of the great Columbian Exposition of Chicago in 1893, which commemorated the 400th anniversary of Columbus' discovery of America.(Yes, we know: Columbus sailed the ocean blue in fourteen hundred and ninety-two. The real 400th anniversary was celebrated in 1892 in Seville, Spain, from whence Columbus had set sail for the New World; the final part of the celebration took place in America the following year during the 401st anniversary.)The exposition served to highlight the great strides in American cultural advancement, negating any doubts about American inferiority.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | December 29, 2012
For many Carroll residents, a visit to the Pleasant Valley Christmas Train Garden is a touchstone of the holiday season that brings them back year after year. And each year for the past 30 years, there have been others who discover the garden's magic for the first time and make plans to return to the Pleasant Valley Community Fire Company station in pastoral hamlet of Pleasant Valley for a visit the following December as well. Mike Chrest, of Union Mills, a long-time volunteer firefighter, has been the principal curator and keeper of the roughly 18- by 18-foot HO-gauge train garden, which casts a warm glow in the dimly lit gallery-sized room where it is housed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Shelonda Stokes has a vision for this year's African American Festival — and it's a whopper. In her second year producing the festival, she's already excited about one of its new features: a fitness-craving flashmob, with enough people to earn a place in the Guinness Book of World Records, bopping and gyrating to the tune of Beyonce singing "Move Your Body. " That part's all planned and ready to go. Now here's the dream part: One of those dancers leading the way is first lady Michelle Obama.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2011
Above, find a high-resolution map of Merriweather Post Pavilion grounds on Saturday for Virgin FreeFest. The map looks much like last year's. There are three stages: a dance forest, a festival stage on the venue's West side, and a main stage at the amphitheater. There will again be a ferris wheel. The heart of the venue will be again commandeered by festival sponsor Kyocera. Doors will open at 11 a.m. The first band goes up at noon on the dance forest stage. The full schedule is here .
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 22, 2011
Don't panic. That's what Wall Street is telling Main Street. Those same guys who are photographed almost daily with their faces buried in their hands - there is even an Internet photo gallery called "The Brokers With Hands on Their Faces Blog" - are telling us not to panic. So, I have been wondering. What does "don't panic" mean? If we shouldn't panic when the Dow drops 600 points in a single day, when, exactly, should we panic? When it drops 400 points the next day?
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
A 13-story structure pitched as Baltimore's Eiffel Tower and a 200-foot-tall Ferris wheel could rewrite the skyline of downtown Baltimore if either is approved by city officials for the Inner Harbor waterfront. The city and the Baltimore Development Corp., its quasi-public development arm, released details this week of nine proposals received last month from companies in the United States and Europe. One or more of the proposed attractions could be installed as part of a city plan to provide family-friendly entertainment along the downtown waterfront.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | October 21, 2009
Baltimore's vintage Inner Harbor Carousel could be replaced by a pirate-themed theater, a miniature golf course, a traveling Ripley's Believe or Not exhibit or a Ferris wheel. It also might give way to a new carousel, with figures shaped like anything from orioles and ravens to exotic fish from the National Aquarium. Those were a few of the ideas presented Tuesday to city officials attempting to decide whether to replace the 1906 Herschell-Spillman hand-carved carousel that has been a fixture on the Inner Harbor shoreline since 1981 but has seen falling ridership.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
Rodney, Rodney, Rodney! This Ocean City lifeguard lookalike gets all of the attention in summer so it makes complete sense that he's taking over the town - at least for a day. Ocean City officials say the "spokesguard" - um, he's not a real member of the beach patrol - will be all about town on Tuesday, meeting visitors, posing for photos, traveling the boardwalk and even working behind the counter at Fisher's Popcorn. Rodney's day will start early at the umbrella stand near the pier.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2001
OCEAN CITY -- Twelve-year-old Brittanie Thornton was taking no chances yesterday. Shrieking at the top of her lungs, clutching an inner tube with one hand and pinching her nostrils tight with the other as she hurtled down a giant plastic tube at Splash Mountain Water Park, the rising seventh-grader from William H. Lemmel Middle School in Baltimore had but one worry. She was not bothered by the 60-foot drop or the speed of her descent. But she was absolutely determined that no water get up her nose.
TRAVEL
June 12, 2005
`Eye' Strain London's giant observation wheel may face cloudy future When it first went up, the London Eye, like the Eiffel Tower in Paris more than a century ago, was considered by some to be an eyesore, a blot on the skyline, an engineering monstrosity. But like the Eiffel Tower, the Eye - a gigantic observation wheel on the banks of the Thames - has become a symbol of the city and one of its most popular tourist attractions. The Eye opened Dec. 31, 1999, the eve of the new millennium.
FEATURES
August 13, 2004
Since Otar Left Unrated; Score ***1/2 Contrived dialogue can lead believable characters and plots astray and ruin everything in its path. Thankfully there's a flip side, displayed most beautifully in Julie Bertuccelli's Since Otar Left, a gem in which fictional characters become human by talking as real people really talk. Otar tells the story of three generations of Georgian women - Eka, her daughter Marina and her granddaughter Ada - who live in Tbilisi, capital of the former Soviet republic.
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