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By ROSALIE M. FALTER | June 27, 1994
Eleven students from Ferndale Elementary School's recent class of sixth-grade graduates made the honor roll. They are: David Bush, John Cargo, Rachel Engel, Kristen Fitzgerald, Dana Hooe, Elizabeth Horn, Shannon Mason, Frank Maule, David Radford, Dana Semmont and Steven Webster.The Presidential Fitness Award for Excellence for carrying a 4.0 average went to David Radford. David Bush and Elizabeth Horn also received the Presidential Award for Outstanding Efforts.During graduation, the class gave Ferndale Elementary two beautiful potted plants that now decorate the school office.
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NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | November 30, 2007
For Sarah Wagner, her last year at her beloved Ferndale Elementary School became the last for the whole school. In 2003, the school closed because of low enrollment. "It was a sad year," said Wagner, now a sophomore at Annapolis Area Christian School. "The whole time I was there, we were just fighting to keep it open." Those sad feelings were swept away, she said, when she saw her former elementary school transformed into Anne Arundel County's first preschool and kindergarten center, according to school officials.
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NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Anne Arundel County schools Superintendent Eric J. Smith said yesterday that he will recommend closing the dilapidated, but beloved, Ferndale Elementary School and building in its place the county's first institution devoted entirely to pre-kindergarten and kindergarten. If approved by the board, Smith's plan would bring to an end years of controversy surrounding the small, gray, 77-year-old building on Wellham Avenue. In July, noting unsafe and unhealthful conditions, Smith temporarily shuttered the county's smallest elementary school and sent its 140 pupils to nearby George Cromwell Elementary.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2003
The Anne Arundel County school board voted yesterday to move forward with a proposal to create a regional "early childhood center" for 4-year-olds and 5-year-olds on the site of dilapidated Ferndale Elementary School, opening the issue to a public hearing in coming weeks. The board declined requests for public hearing from three communities seeking to redistrict their children to other schools. Board member Paul Rudolph introduced motions on behalf of two of the groups, but they failed because of a lack of support from the board.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 1996
"CONGRATULATE me," said Jeffrey Kelly when his mother came to pick him up from school one day earlier this year.Nine-year-old Jeff couldn't wait to show her the letter announcing that his artwork was chosen for display at the Anne Arundel delegation room in the House of Delegates building in Annapolis.The show of selected artwork from county schools opened in January and will continue through mid-April.For Jeff, a fourth-grader at Ferndale Elementary School, the project combined his social studies class' study of Japan with his art class' study of Japanese print-making.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | November 30, 2007
For Sarah Wagner, her last year at her beloved Ferndale Elementary School became the last for the whole school. In 2003, the school closed because of low enrollment. "It was a sad year," said Wagner, now a sophomore at Annapolis Area Christian School. "The whole time I was there, we were just fighting to keep it open." Those sad feelings were swept away, she said, when she saw her former elementary school transformed into Anne Arundel County's first preschool and kindergarten center, according to school officials.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
The crumbling but beloved Ferndale Elementary School - after teetering on the brink of closure for years - won a promise yesterday that it will stay open and it will be fixed. The Anne Arundel County school board voted 6-1 to keep the 76-year-old school open and to put $450,000 into it next year, with more money in the future, until Ferndale is whole again. Supporters of the tiny school, who waged an intense, personal struggle to save it, couldn't believe their grass-roots effort had succeeded.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2001
The parents and children of Ferndale have made their strongest appeal yet to the Anne Arundel County school board in their fight to save their beloved but crumbling elementary school. About 50 Ferndale residents took a chartered bus to the board meeting in Annapolis on Wednesday night, where they presented a petition to save Ferndale Elementary School that was signed by 1,093 people, along with 78 letters, including some from young children. Eddie Layton, a second-grader at Ferndale, wrote on loose-leaf paper: "Please keep Ferndale Elementary School open.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2002
When Anne Arundel County Schools Superintendent Eric J. Smith proposed this week building an early childhood education center on the site of crumbling Ferndale Elementary School, he was thinking creatively - something state officials say every school system will have to do to meet new education standards in five years. The new center - if approved by the school board - would be one of the few public educational institutions in Maryland devoted to 4- and 5-year-olds, according to state education officials.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2001
A chorus of children at Ferndale Elementary School launched into the second verse of "Down by the Riverside." Moments later, a torrent of rainwater came streaming down the walls and flooded the cafeteria floor. This was no special effect. It was simply a leaking roof. The fateful day two years ago is at the heart of an oft-repeated tale in the small town of Ferndale, where residents are struggling to keep their tiny, aging elementary school from closing. For years, people in Ferndale have taken care of the school -- with mops and paint and plaster -- because it was always more than just a building to them.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2002
When Anne Arundel County Schools Superintendent Eric J. Smith this week proposed building an early childhood education center on the site of crumbling Ferndale Elementary School, he was thinking creatively - something state officials say every school system will have to do to meet new education standards in five years. The new center - if approved by the school board - would be one of the few public educational institutions in Maryland devoted to 4- and 5-year-olds, according to state education officials.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2002
When Anne Arundel County Schools Superintendent Eric J. Smith proposed this week building an early childhood education center on the site of crumbling Ferndale Elementary School, he was thinking creatively - something state officials say every school system will have to do to meet new education standards in five years. The new center - if approved by the school board - would be one of the few public educational institutions in Maryland devoted to 4- and 5-year-olds, according to state education officials.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Anne Arundel County schools Superintendent Eric J. Smith said yesterday that he will recommend closing the dilapidated, but beloved, Ferndale Elementary School and erecting in its place the county's first institution devoted entirely to prekindergarten and kindergarten. If approved by the board, Smith's plan would bring to an end years of controversy surrounding the small, gray, 77-year-old building on Wellham Avenue. In July, noting unsafe and unhealthful conditions, Smith temporarily shuttered the county's smallest elementary school and sent its 140 students to nearby George Cromwell Elementary.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Anne Arundel County schools Superintendent Eric J. Smith said yesterday that he will recommend closing the dilapidated, but beloved, Ferndale Elementary School and building in its place the county's first institution devoted entirely to pre-kindergarten and kindergarten. If approved by the board, Smith's plan would bring to an end years of controversy surrounding the small, gray, 77-year-old building on Wellham Avenue. In July, noting unsafe and unhealthful conditions, Smith temporarily shuttered the county's smallest elementary school and sent its 140 pupils to nearby George Cromwell Elementary.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2002
The 150 children of Ferndale Elementary streamed out of their battered school yesterday into the brilliant sunshine, not to return until the school's doors reopen in the fall. At most schools and for most children, that routine is as certain as summer is short. But in Ferndale, a small working-class community holding fast to its identity, the fact that children will be returning at all is big news and a big relief. A year ago, the 77-year-old school was on the brink of closure. The walls were moldy and cracked, and rooms were filled with buckets and trashcans to catch what the old, leaky roof could not. The facilities were so poor and the cost of fixing them so high that Ferndale, which has seven classrooms, seemed to be beyond saving.
NEWS
October 28, 2001
Thanking all who helped save Ferndale Elementary On behalf of the entire Ferndale Community - and especially the members of the Save Ferndale Elementary School Committee - I wish to express our most sincere thanks to a number of people who are instrumental in our continued efforts to save our beloved elementary school and, in fact, our community as a whole. First and foremost, our most heartfelt thanks go to the Anne Arundel school board for their willingness to support our goal of keeping Ferndale open.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Anne Arundel County schools Superintendent Eric J. Smith said yesterday that he will recommend closing the dilapidated, but beloved, Ferndale Elementary School and erecting in its place the county's first institution devoted entirely to prekindergarten and kindergarten. If approved by the board, Smith's plan would bring to an end years of controversy surrounding the small, gray, 77-year-old building on Wellham Avenue. In July, noting unsafe and unhealthful conditions, Smith temporarily shuttered the county's smallest elementary school and sent its 140 students to nearby George Cromwell Elementary.
NEWS
By Rosalie M. Falter | December 11, 1990
One of this column's aims is to acquaint you with some of the less-obvious activities taking place in the area. As an example, the YWCA of Greater Baltimore organizes luncheon groups in order to promote adventures in ethnic and gourmet dining.Since 1973 I have been a member of one of these groups and I'd like to tell you something about it. We call ourselves The Gourmet Club, and it is composed of 12 members who meet once a month from September through May.Each month, a menu is researched and prepared; each member is responsible for preparing a part of the menu and bringing it to the hostess' home.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
The crumbling but beloved Ferndale Elementary School - after teetering on the brink of closure for years - won a promise yesterday that it will stay open and it will be fixed. The Anne Arundel County school board voted 6-1 to keep the 76-year-old school open and to put $450,000 into it next year, with more money in the future, until Ferndale is whole again. Supporters of the tiny school, who waged an intense, personal struggle to save it, couldn't believe their grass-roots effort had succeeded.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
The crumbling but beloved Ferndale Elementary School - after teetering on the brink of closure for years - won a promise yesterday that it will stay open and it will be fixed. The Anne Arundel County school board voted 6-1 to keep the 76-year-old school open and to put $450,000 into it next year, with more money in the future, until Ferndale is whole again. Supporters of the tiny school, who waged an intense, personal struggle to save it, couldn't believe their grass-roots effort had succeeded.
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