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Fernando Hernandez

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By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | August 23, 1993
The wife of convicted Taneytown drug dealer Fernando Antonio Hernandez, one of only three people in Carroll to be charged under the state's drug kingpin law, is seeking an end to their 11-year marriage.In divorce papers filed in Carroll Circuit Court last week, Bonnie Sharon Hernandez -- who herself was charged under the kingpin law -- says her husband's 14-year sentence leaves "no reasonable hope or expectation of a reconciliation."She is seeking custody of the couple's three children, child support and nearly $600 to cover half of the couple's overdue state and federal taxes.
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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1995
Having last month lost the latest round in his four-year quest to shorten his 14-year prison sentence, Taneytown cocaine dealer Fernando Hernandez is asking the state's second-highest court for another chance to argue his case.Hernandez, who in 1991 pleaded guilty to charges of cocaine possession and conspiracy to distribute, has asked the Court of Special Appeals to reconsider Carroll Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr.'s Jan. 11 denial of his request for a trial.In the request, filed Feb. 10, Hernandez said that Judge Beck should not have presided over Hernandez's November 1994 post-conviction relief hearing, and that he should not have thrown out Hernandez's assertions that his guilty plea was not made freely and voluntarily.
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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | May 19, 1993
An immigration judge yesterday rejected the government' bid to deport Taneytown cocaine dealer Fernando Hernandez, one of only three people in Carroll to be charged under the state's drug kingpin law."The court seemed to think Fernando was not trafficking in drugs, he was not a big dealer and that he wasn't a kingpin," said Ana C. Zigel, Hernandez's Owings Mills immigration attorney."The court said he doesn't show the characteristics of a drug dealer, and he turned to cocaine out of financial desperation."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | February 15, 1994
Nearly 18 months after Taneytown cocaine dealer Fernando Hernandez tearfully begged for a reduction of his 14-year prison sentence, a Carroll Circuit judge has turned him down.Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. said in an order signed Thursday and filed yesterday that Hernandez's sentence "hopefully would act as a deterrent to future cocaine dealers in Carroll County."Hernandez, one of the first three people ever charged in Carroll under the state's drug kingpin law, asked Judge Burns during his September 1992 sentence-reduction hearing to consider what a 14-year sentence would do to his three young children and his former wife.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | February 19, 1992
The final member of what the State's Attorney Office termed a Florida-to-Carroll County cocaine ring is expected to be sentenced tomorrowin Circuit Court.Henry Hernandez of Miami faces sentencing on a conspiracy conviction stemming from a plea agreement with the State'sAttorney's Office, in which charges against him, his brother and hissister-in-law under Maryland's drug kingpin statutes were dropped.Henry Hernandez, his brother Fernando Hernandez, 28, and Fernando's wife, Bonnie, were indicted by a county grand jury in January on charges that they ran the cocaine ring.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | December 4, 1991
After hearing emotional pleas for mercy from the family and friends of 28-year-old Fernando A. Hernandez, a Carroll Circuit judge yesterday sentenced him to 14 years in prison for possession of cocaine withintent to distribute.His wife, Bonnie Hernandez, 28, received a suspended three-year sentence and was placed on probation on a misdemeanor charge of conspiring to distribute cocaine.In sentencing Fernando Hernandez, Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr.said he took into consideration that Hernandez never had a drug problem and dealt drugs only to make money.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | December 18, 1991
A Taneytown man who was sentenced to 14 years in prison after pleading guilty to misdemeanor drug charges is trying to have the plea withdrawn, charging misconduct by the State's Attorney's Office.In documents filed in Carroll County Circuit Court on Friday, lawyers for Fernando A. Hernandez say the plea agreement -- reached after the state's attorney dropped charges against Hernandez, his wife and his brother under Maryland's drug kingpin laws -- "was not entered into voluntarily" and was made without "an intelligent understanding of the nature of the offenses to which (Fernando Hernandez)
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | February 15, 1994
Nearly 18 months after Taneytown cocaine dealer Fernando Hernandez tearfully begged for a reduction of his 14-year prison sentence, a Carroll Circuit judge has turned him down.Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. said in an order signed Thursday and filed yesterday that Hernandez's sentence "hopefully would act as a deterrent to future cocaine dealers in Carroll County."Hernandez, one of the first three people ever charged in Carroll under the state's drug kingpin law, asked Judge Burns during his September 1992 sentence-reduction hearing to consider what a 14-year sentence would do to his three young children and his former wife.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1995
Having last month lost the latest round in his four-year quest to shorten his 14-year prison sentence, Taneytown cocaine dealer Fernando Hernandez is asking the state's second-highest court for another chance to argue his case.Hernandez, who in 1991 pleaded guilty to charges of cocaine possession and conspiracy to distribute, has asked the Court of Special Appeals to reconsider Carroll Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr.'s Jan. 11 denial of his request for a trial.In the request, filed Feb. 10, Hernandez said that Judge Beck should not have presided over Hernandez's November 1994 post-conviction relief hearing, and that he should not have thrown out Hernandez's assertions that his guilty plea was not made freely and voluntarily.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | September 6, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Taneytown drug dealer Fernando Hernandez stood in front of Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. and tearfully begged for a reduction of his 14-year prison sentence."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | August 23, 1993
The wife of convicted Taneytown drug dealer Fernando Antonio Hernandez, one of only three people in Carroll to be charged under the state's drug kingpin law, is seeking an end to their 11-year marriage.In divorce papers filed in Carroll Circuit Court last week, Bonnie Sharon Hernandez -- who herself was charged under the kingpin law -- says her husband's 14-year sentence leaves "no reasonable hope or expectation of a reconciliation."She is seeking custody of the couple's three children, child support and nearly $600 to cover half of the couple's overdue state and federal taxes.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | May 19, 1993
An immigration judge yesterday rejected the government' bid to deport Taneytown cocaine dealer Fernando Hernandez, one of only three people in Carroll to be charged under the state's drug kingpin law."The court seemed to think Fernando was not trafficking in drugs, he was not a big dealer and that he wasn't a kingpin," said Ana C. Zigel, Hernandez's Owings Mills immigration attorney."The court said he doesn't show the characteristics of a drug dealer, and he turned to cocaine out of financial desperation."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | September 6, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Taneytown drug dealer Fernando Hernandez stood in front of Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. and tearfully begged for a reduction of his 14-year prison sentence."
NEWS
February 23, 1992
Henry Hernandez, the Miami man who was indicted last year under the state's drug kingpin statute, was given a 10-year suspended sentence last week.Hernandez, his brother, Fernando Hernandez, and Fernando's wife, Bonnie, were indicted by a county grand jury in January 1990 on charges that they ran a Florida-to-Carroll cocaine ring.Henry Hernandez was the last of the three to be sentenced in the case, in which drug kingpin charges ultimately were dropped.He was sentenced on a misdemeanor conspiracy conviction, stemming from theplea agreement with the state's attorney in which the kingpin charges were dropped, and his sentence was far lighter than that of his brother.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | February 19, 1992
The final member of what the State's Attorney Office termed a Florida-to-Carroll County cocaine ring is expected to be sentenced tomorrowin Circuit Court.Henry Hernandez of Miami faces sentencing on a conspiracy conviction stemming from a plea agreement with the State'sAttorney's Office, in which charges against him, his brother and hissister-in-law under Maryland's drug kingpin statutes were dropped.Henry Hernandez, his brother Fernando Hernandez, 28, and Fernando's wife, Bonnie, were indicted by a county grand jury in January on charges that they ran the cocaine ring.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | December 18, 1991
A Taneytown man who was sentenced to 14 years in prison after pleading guilty to misdemeanor drug charges is trying to have the plea withdrawn, charging misconduct by the State's Attorney's Office.In documents filed in Carroll County Circuit Court on Friday, lawyers for Fernando A. Hernandez say the plea agreement -- reached after the state's attorney dropped charges against Hernandez, his wife and his brother under Maryland's drug kingpin laws -- "was not entered into voluntarily" and was made without "an intelligent understanding of the nature of the offenses to which (Fernando Hernandez)
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | September 15, 1991
The state's drug kingpin law was misapplied in its first use in Carroll, defense attorneys and the county state's attorney agreed last week.Westminster attorneys Stephen P. Bourexis and Judith Stainbrook, who represented a former Taneytown couple charged under the kingpin statute with distributing cocaine, claimed for months their clientswere not major drug dealers and did not come under jurisdiction of the statute.County prosecutors maintained that Fernando A. and Bonnie Hernandez, now of Sykesville, were the Carroll connection in a cocaine ring importing large amounts of the drug from Florida.
NEWS
February 23, 1992
Henry Hernandez, the Miami man who was indicted last year under the state's drug kingpin statute, was given a 10-year suspended sentence last week.Hernandez, his brother, Fernando Hernandez, and Fernando's wife, Bonnie, were indicted by a county grand jury in January 1990 on charges that they ran a Florida-to-Carroll cocaine ring.Henry Hernandez was the last of the three to be sentenced in the case, in which drug kingpin charges ultimately were dropped.He was sentenced on a misdemeanor conspiracy conviction, stemming from theplea agreement with the state's attorney in which the kingpin charges were dropped, and his sentence was far lighter than that of his brother.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | December 4, 1991
After hearing emotional pleas for mercy from the family and friends of 28-year-old Fernando A. Hernandez, a Carroll Circuit judge yesterday sentenced him to 14 years in prison for possession of cocaine withintent to distribute.His wife, Bonnie Hernandez, 28, received a suspended three-year sentence and was placed on probation on a misdemeanor charge of conspiring to distribute cocaine.In sentencing Fernando Hernandez, Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr.said he took into consideration that Hernandez never had a drug problem and dealt drugs only to make money.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | September 15, 1991
The state's drug kingpin law was misapplied in its first use in Carroll, defense attorneys and the county state's attorney agreed last week.Westminster attorneys Stephen P. Bourexis and Judith Stainbrook, who represented a former Taneytown couple charged under the kingpin statute with distributing cocaine, claimed for months their clientswere not major drug dealers and did not come under jurisdiction of the statute.County prosecutors maintained that Fernando A. and Bonnie Hernandez, now of Sykesville, were the Carroll connection in a cocaine ring importing large amounts of the drug from Florida.
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