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NEWS
October 1, 2014
In response to reader Grant Sizemore's letter, I agree that any animal bite is dangerous and that schools should respond with caution to one that enters their building ( "Feral cats pose a serious health threat to humans," Sept. 26). It is very unlikely that a feral cat would attack unless cornered and threatened, however. And I strongly disagree with his dismissal of a Trap-Neuter-Return strategy to minimize the number of homeless or feral cats. First, no one wants to see fewer cats on the streets more than the people practicing TNR, and they at least are doing something about it by choosing a humane approach to the problem that they can live with.
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NEWS
October 5, 2014
The problem of feral cat overpopulation cannot be solved with trap, neuter and release programs ( "Cat that closed Glen Burnie school moved to animal rescue shelter," Sept. 5). Such initiatives merely repeat the irresponsible human behavior of dumping and abandonment that caused the problem in the first place. Municipalities that embrace TNR are encouraging more dumping and abandonment. Unfortunately, with approximately 80 million free-ranging cats in the U.S., no one will ever be able to sterilize enough of them to have any significant impact on cat populations.
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NEWS
March 1, 2013
In his recent commentary, George Fenwick calls cats "invasive" and "not part of the natural environment," blaming cats for billions of bird and rodent deaths ("The destructive invasive species purring on your lap," Feb. 26). He claims that trap, neuter, return (TNR) programs are a failed strategy and asks for local governments to gather millions of unowned cats and "euthanize" those for which homes cannot be found. Sadly, his claims are not based on facts. The millions of cats in America are now as much a part of the "natural environment" as are the millions of people on this continent descended from the Pilgrims and other immigrants.
NEWS
October 4, 2014
Grant Sizemore's recent letter ( "Feral cats pose a serious health threat to humans," Sept. 26) betrays a fundamental misunderstanding of statistics and serves as a textbook example of how such misinterpretations can lead to poor public policy. According to Mr. Sizemore, the Labor Day weekend closing of an Anne Arundel County elementary school, the result of animal control officers' search for a stray cat who'd wandered inside, "demonstrated prudent concern for the health and well-being of students.
NEWS
May 14, 2010
Your article about feral cats ("Cats cared for under the radar," May 10) highlighted how members of a community can come together to help their neighborhoods. Instead of simply calling to complain about unwanted feral cats near their homes, citizens like Jolene Baldwin actively work to improve the situation. The Maryland SPCA works closely with Ms. Baldwin and other feral cat caretakers to reduce the numbers of unwanted animals in our community. Last year, the Maryland SPCA fixed almost 10,000 animals at our high-volume spay/neuter clinic, including 1,400 feral cats.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
Op-ed writer George Fenwick's assertion that trap, neuter and release programs (TNR) lead to an increase in the number of uninoculated species is unfounded. He obviously does not understand how TNR works. TNR is a program that allows a cat caretaker to trap their feral cat, bring it to a facility to be spayed/neutered and vaccinated for rabies and then released back into the colony. This caretaker will care for the cat the rest of its life. This caretaker feeds the cat, which results in less predation on the bird population.
NEWS
By Vikki Valentine and Vikki Valentine,Contributing Writer | August 30, 1995
Since early spring, Rhonda Disbrow has lived with wild cats howling, banging and fighting all night under her mobile home at Deep Run Park in Elkridge -- cats that also have infested her trailer with fleas that have refused to succumb to rounds of pesticides.Both types of pests are increasing as a result of two litters of feral cats born under her trailer this summer. And months of pleas for help from the 30-year-old single mother to county animal control officials haven't solved the problem.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | November 19, 2007
A woman in Pigtown looks forward to her regular visitors: alley cats that come for their daily fix of food. A couple in Northwest Baltimore feed a stray they've named "old gray and white cat" and six to nine others. And a woman in Canton expects the six stray cats that meander into her backyard every afternoon, all of which she's trapped, spayed and neutered this year, along with 44 other stray cats within a five-block radius of her house. All stand to benefit from pending legislation, to be voted on by the City Council today, that would make it legal and easier for them to care for feral cats.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin T. Reid and Robin T. Reid,Special to the Sun | April 2, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Louise Holton often jokes that she never tells people how many cats she has. Because, in truth, the number is impossible to count. In the United States, there are the more than 60 million feral cats (semi-wild felines that have grown up without human contact), and Holton has taken responsibility for each one of them. The 58-year-old is the co-founder of Alley Cat Allies, a national nonprofit organization based in Washington. Working out of offices in the city's funky Adams-Morgan neighborhood, the 13-member staff answers some 500 calls a month, gives out advice on handling feral cats, and cares for some decidedly non-ferals that sleep on whatever lap is available.
NEWS
By Becky Robinson | September 4, 2014
The first day of school can be scary for little ones, and for Stephanie it was traumatic. A small tortoiseshell cat with tiny white toes, Stephanie - as she has been nicknamed by the shelter now caring for her - created a flurry of news stories and speculation over the Labor Day weekend after she got lost inside a local school. Richard Henry Lee Elementary in Glen Burnie treated her kitty sighting with the severity of a bomb threat, choosing to evacuate students and close at 9:45 a.m. on Friday of last week, after a teacher caught a glimpse of Stephanie loose without a hall pass.
NEWS
October 1, 2014
In response to reader Grant Sizemore's letter, I agree that any animal bite is dangerous and that schools should respond with caution to one that enters their building ( "Feral cats pose a serious health threat to humans," Sept. 26). It is very unlikely that a feral cat would attack unless cornered and threatened, however. And I strongly disagree with his dismissal of a Trap-Neuter-Return strategy to minimize the number of homeless or feral cats. First, no one wants to see fewer cats on the streets more than the people practicing TNR, and they at least are doing something about it by choosing a humane approach to the problem that they can live with.
NEWS
October 1, 2014
I am all for the feral cats Let it be noted that I am not talking at all about the feral cat in the school, however ( "Feral cats pose a serious health threat to humans," Sept. 26). I do know that the American Bird Conservancy bitterly despises all feral cats and would willingly kill them all. The Department of Natural Resources in Maryland is also very antiquated in their concepts about these cats and would also kill them. I have worked with feral cats and kittens - rescuing them, getting them medical checkups, needed shots and gradually turning them into some of the kindest and most loving animals that I have ever known.
NEWS
September 26, 2014
In late August, Richard Henry Lee Elementary School in Glen Burnie had to close its doors because a feral cat had found its way into the building. In closing the school, officials demonstrated prudent concern for the health and well-being of students. Feral cat activists bemoaned the caution exercised by officials, charging that officials had reacted to the feral cat sighting with the severity of a bomb threat after a teacher caught a glimpse of the animal loose without a hall pass ( "Anne Arundel's cruel cat policy," Sept.
NEWS
By Becky Robinson | September 4, 2014
The first day of school can be scary for little ones, and for Stephanie it was traumatic. A small tortoiseshell cat with tiny white toes, Stephanie - as she has been nicknamed by the shelter now caring for her - created a flurry of news stories and speculation over the Labor Day weekend after she got lost inside a local school. Richard Henry Lee Elementary in Glen Burnie treated her kitty sighting with the severity of a bomb threat, choosing to evacuate students and close at 9:45 a.m. on Friday of last week, after a teacher caught a glimpse of Stephanie loose without a hall pass.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
It's kitten season, which is the time of year animal shelters are flooded with young cats. It can be overwhelming for shelters, which can lack the space, funding, and the people to care for young kittens, some of which need to be bottle-fed every few hours, and many of which must be weaned, spayed/neutered, and then adopted. It's also when well-meaning animal lovers come through the doors with feral litters they've found outside. The experts at Best Friends Animal Society, which runs one of the largest no-kill shelters in the world and works to end shelter deaths of dogs and cats, say that while people have the best of intentions in rescuing stray litters of kittens, it's not always the best thing to do. Shelter managers do everything they can to save all the pets they receive, says Best Friends, but it's not always possible, and about 70 percent of cats that enter shelters never leave.
NEWS
By Melanie Dzwonchyk, mdzwonchyk@tribune.com | October 18, 2013
A Laurel group that works to humanely reduce the local stray and feral cat population will hold a community workshop on Wednesday, Oct. 23 at 7 p.m. in the city's pool meeting room, Ninth and Main streets. The workshop, sponsored by Laurel TNR (trap-neuter-return), will cover how to safely trap stray and feral cats to be spayed or neutered, vaccinated and returned to the territories, a process known as TNR. Participants will also learn how to care for colonies of community cats and working with neighbors to address cat issues.
NEWS
October 1, 2014
I am all for the feral cats Let it be noted that I am not talking at all about the feral cat in the school, however ( "Feral cats pose a serious health threat to humans," Sept. 26). I do know that the American Bird Conservancy bitterly despises all feral cats and would willingly kill them all. The Department of Natural Resources in Maryland is also very antiquated in their concepts about these cats and would also kill them. I have worked with feral cats and kittens - rescuing them, getting them medical checkups, needed shots and gradually turning them into some of the kindest and most loving animals that I have ever known.
NEWS
March 2, 2013
I am compelled to respond to George Fenwick's commentary ("The destructive invasive species purring on your lap," Feb. 26). He cites recent studies suggesting very high bird and mammal deaths due to outdoor cats. He then goes on to propose a Draconian solution that could accurately be described as a cat witch hunt. I do acknowledge the problem, particularly with feral cats (free-roaming, unowned). But Dr. Fenwick's attempt to demonize cats by use of terms like "invasive species," "invaders," "introduced predator," and "slaughter" invests his thesis with a hysteria usually reserved for al-Qaida sightings.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
I would like to give praise and thanks to the Laurel spay-neuter-release program, the staff at Spay Now Animal Surgery and to a few great neighbors for helping and saving ferals. I have been taking care of some ferals for about four years; they were living under a complex that is in the middle of a tear down. I kept them fed, area clean and comfortable. The spay-neuter team heard about this and came. At first I resisted and probably several times throughout, but don't! They know exactly what they are doing with the best intentions and ease for the animals.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Baltimore County health officials found a rabid cat in the Milford Mill area and are looking for anyone who may have been exposed to the animal. The feral cat was gray, tan and white and lived among a group of other cats near Rhonda Court. The animal has since died of rabies. Health officials are seeking anyone who may have had exposure to the cat between March 28 and April 12. They are also encouraging neighbors to keep pets - particularly cats - indoors as they attempt to capture the other feral cats in the neighborhood.
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